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Winter Safety

The Department of Defense has taken great care to train and teach our Service members how to prevent cold weather injuries.  The Medical Health System would like to emphasize those same facts that apply during missions and duty and highlight their use during off-duty activities.  The winter months are a great time for outdoor activities provided you are properly prepared for the elements.  Simple tips like dressing in layers, limiting caffeine and alcohol intake and being aware of the weather can prevent Hypothermia, Frostbite and muscle strain due to overexertion. 

Resources & Links

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Federal Emergency Management Agency

U.S. Army Public Health Center

Other

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The simple – and complicated – task of shoveling snow

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2/5/2019
Army Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Seifridsberger shovels knee-deep snow to build a simulated hasty firing position during training exercise Ready Force Breach at Fort Drum, New York. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Andrew Carroll)

When in the throes of winter weather, there are ways to prepare for a successful, injury-free snow shoveling activity

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Winter safety tips to stay safe, healthy

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A heavy-equipment operator with the Fort McCoy snow removal, drives a plow truck to move snow. Winter can be a hazardous time of year. Frigid temperatures and slick roads can be dangerous. (U.S. Army photo by Scott T. Sturkol)

Winter can be a hazardous time of year. Being prepared and knowing your TRICARE health care options will help you and your family remain safe this winter

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Winter Safety

The relentless winter poses risk for head injuries

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3/21/2018
With each storm during the winter and spring months, falls due to weather conditions or recreational activities can occur, increasing the risk for a traumatic brain injury. Prevention through safety measures, such as taking extra time to get around during icy conditions, and being aware of surroundings, can help reduce risk. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

Whether snowboarding or walking on an icy sidewalk, winter conditions and sports can pose an increased risk for traumatic brain injuries

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No chill zone: Give winter weather injuries the cold shoulder

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2/5/2018
Chill factor, improper warm up, and inadequate clothing can contribute to the risk for cold injuries. Experts encourage everyone, whether acclimated to cold weather or not, to protect against cold-temperature injuries this winter. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Cody Rowe)

Learn preventive steps to reduce risks of cold-temperature injuries

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Cold injuries among active duty U.S. service members drop to lowest level since winter 2011–2012

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U.S. service members often perform duties in cold weather climates where they may be exposed to frigid conditions and possible injury.

Cold injuries among active duty U.S. service members drop to the lowest level since winter 2011-2012, according to a study published in Defense Health Agency’s Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) peer-reviewed journal, the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report.

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