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Military Health System Studies Inventory Tool

Welcome to the Military Health System Studies Inventory Tool (MSIT). Military Health System (MHS) data are used by Department of Defense, Veterans Administration, and academic health professionals and scientists to implement health care studies. These studies reflect the MHS interest to rigorously assess and improve our beneficiaries’ access to the high quality health care services they need. Additionally, these studies are frequently used to develop or improve MHS policy and often adopt useful, relevant comparisons to the national health care experience.

The MSIT allows easy review of recent studies that are either conducted or sponsored by the MHS, or accomplished using datasets developed or maintained by the Defense Health Agency for administrative, operational, or research purposes. The studies within this website represent important contributions of the MHS to the national health care dialogue and reflect our capacity to tackle the challenging issues needed to support evidence-informed health policy. Thank you for your interest in them.

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The DoD Joint Pathology Center as a Resource for Researchers.

Study

Abstract

The Department of Defense's Joint Pathology Center (JPC) is the world's largest collection of human pathology specimens, comprising some 7.4 million accessions. The biorepository, which began during the Civil War as a collection of materials obtained from medical and surgical procedures performed by Army physicians, houses specimens and associated data obtained for diagnostic purposes. It also holds several collections of specimens from military personnel who shared a common, service-related exposure or medical condition. This article, which is excerpted and adapted from the 2012 Institute of Medicine report "Future Uses of the Department of Defense JPC Biorepository,"1 summarizes information on the repository, its past uses, and the future operational issues and challenges that the JPC faces as it develops a concept of operations that will allow it to move forward as a resource for researchers.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Joint Pathology Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2015
  • Citation: Butler DA, Baker TP. The DoD Joint Pathology Center as a Resource for Researchers. Mil Med. 2015 Oct;180(10 Suppl):85-9.

Molecular Epidemiology of Adenovirus Type 21 Respiratory Strains Isolated From US Military Trainees (1996-2014).

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The circulation of human adenovirus type 21 (HAdV21) in the United States has been documented since the 1960s in association with outbreaks of febrile respiratory illness (FRI) in military boot camps and civilian cases of respiratory disease. METHODS: To describe the molecular epidemiology of HAdV21 respiratory infections across the country, 150 clinical respiratory isolates obtained from continuous surveillance of military recruit FRI, and 23 respiratory isolates recovered from pediatric and adult civilian cases of acute respiratory infection were characterized to compile molecular typing data spanning 37 years (1978-2014). RESULTS: Restriction enzyme analysis and genomic sequencing identified 2 clusters of closely related genomic variants readily distinguishable from the prototype and designated 21a-like and 21b-like. A-like variants predominated until 1999. A shift to b-like variants was noticeable by 2007 after a 7-year period (2000-2006) of cocirculation of the 2 genome types. US strains are phylogenetically more closely related to European and Asian strains isolated over the last 4 decades than to the Saudi Arabian prototype strain AV-1645 isolated in 1956. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of circulating HAdV21 variants and their epidemic behavior will be of significant value to local and global FRI surveillance efforts.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2015
  • Citation: Kajon AE, et. al., Molecular Epidemiology of Adenovirus Type 21 Respiratory Strains Isolated From US Military Trainees (1996-2014). J Infect Dis. 2015 Sep 15;212(6):871-80.

Protecting military personnel from high risk dietary supplements.

Study

Abstract

It is legal to market most naturally occurring substances as dietary supplements in the USA without manufacturers demonstrating they are safe or effective, and an endless variety of ingredients, from esoteric botanicals to unapproved pharmaceuticals, can be found in dietary supplements. Use of certain supplements can pose a risk, but since a robust reporting system does not exist in the USA it is difficult to know which are problematic and the number of adverse events (AE) resulting from their use. Certain populations, including military personnel, are more likely to use dietary supplements than the general population. Approximately 70% of military personnel take dietary supplements while about 50% of civilians do. Service members prefer supplements purported to enhance physical performance such as supposedly natural stimulants, protein and amino acids, and combination products. Since some of these may be problematic, Service members are probably at higher risk of injury than the general population. Ten percent of military populations appear to be taking potentially risky supplements, and the US Department of Defense (DoD) has taken various measures to protect uniformed personnel including education, policy changes, and restricting sales. Actions taken include launching Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS), introducing a High Risk Supplement list, educating health care professionals on reporting AE that might be associated with dietary supplements, recommending policy for reporting AE, and developing an online AE reporting system. OPSS is a DoD-wide effort to educate service members, leaders, health care providers, military families, and retirees on how to safely select supplements

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2015
  • Citation: Deuster PA, Lieberman HR. Protecting military personnel from high risk dietary supplements. Drug Test Anal. 2015 Oct 16.

Longitudinal determinants of mental health treatment-seeking by US soldiers.

Study

Abstract

Background Studies with members of the armed forces have found a gap between reports of mental health symptoms and treatment-seeking. Aims To assess the impact of attitudes on treatment-seeking behaviours in soldiers returning from a combat deployment. Method A sample of 529 US soldiers were surveyed 4 months (time 1) and 12 months (time 2) post-deployment. Mental health symptoms and treatment-seeking attitudes were assessed at time 1; reported mental healthcare visits were assessed at time 2.Results Factor analysis of the total time 1 sample revealed four attitude factors: professional concerns, practical barriers, preference for self-management and positive attitudes about treatment. For the subset of 160 soldiers reporting a mental health problem at time 1, and controlling for mental health symptom severity, self-management inversely predicted treatment-seeking; positive attitudes were positively related. Conclusions Results demonstrate the importance of broadening the conceptualization of barriers and facilitators of mental healthcare beyond stigma. Techniques and delivery models emphasising self-care may help increase soldiers' interest in using mental health services.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Army
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2015
  • Citation: Adler AB, Britt TW, Riviere LA, Kim PY, Thomas JL. Longitudinal determinants of mental health treatment-seeking by US soldiers. Br J Psychiatry. 2015 Oct;207(4):346-50.

All Military Adolescents Are Not the Same: Sexuality and Substance Use among Adolescents in the U.S. Military Healthcare System.

Study

Abstract

Data examining sexuality and substance use among active duty and military-dependent youth is limited; however, these psychosocial factors have military implications. Adolescents and young adults aged 12-23 were recruited from an active-duty trainee clinic (n = 225) and a military pediatric clinic (n = 223). Active duty participants were more likely to be older, male, White, previous tobacco users, and report a history of sexual activity and less contraception use at their most recent intercourse, compared to the dependent group. Over 10% of all participants indicated attraction to members of the same gender or both genders. In logistic regression analysis, non-White participants were less likely to use contraception compared to White participants. Adolescents and young adults seen in military clinics frequently engage in high-risk behavior. Clinicians who care for military youth should assess their patient's psychosocial history. Further study of this population is warranted to identify factors that may influence risk and resilience.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Air Force
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2015
  • Citation: Klein DA, Adelman WP, Thompson AM, Shoemaker RG, Shen-Gunther J. All Military Adolescents Are Not the Same: Sexuality and Substance Use among Adolescents in the U.S. Military Healthcare System. PLoS One. 2015 Oct 29;10(10):e0141430

Palliative Care in the U.S. Military Health System.

Study

Abstract

No abstract available

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2015
  • Citation: Snyder S. Palliative Care in the U.S. Military Health System. Mil Med. 2015 Oct;180(10):1024-6.

Chikungunya infection in DoD healthcare beneficiaries following the 2013 introduction of the virus into the Western Hemisphere, 1 January 2014 to 28 February 2015.

Study

Abstract

The introduction and rapid spread of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) into the Western Hemisphere after December 2013 pose a potentially significant risk to Department of Defense (DoD) personnel, operations, and the military healthcare system. This report describes the DoD experience with CHIKV between January 2014 and February 2015 using case reports in the Defense Medical Surveillance System's (DMSS) Reportable Medical Events database and the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center's laboratory test results database. Case finding identified 157 confirmed cases; of these, 118 (75.2%) were either active or reserve component service members and 39 (24.8%) were other beneficiaries. Exposure locations were known for 117 (74.5%) of all cases, and of these, 113 (96.6%) reported likely exposures in the Western Hemisphere; 85 (75.2%) of those cases occurred in Puerto Rico. Although historical data on CHIKV in DoD populations are scant, introduction of CHIKV into the Western Hemisphere with ongoing transmission appears to have resulted in a significant increase in the number of cases among DoD healthcare beneficiary populations.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2015
  • Citation: Chikungunya infection in DoD healthcare beneficiaries following the 2013 introduction of the virus into the Western Hemisphere, 1 January 2014 to 28 February 2015. MSMR. 2015 Oct;22(10):2-6.

The vital civilian-military link in combat casualty care research: Impact of attendance at scientific conferences.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Attendance by military medical personnel (MMP) at scientific meetings (SMs) of civilian associations has been centrally managed since 2012. We aimed to document the importance of civilian-military interaction to and the impact of this change on combat casualty care (CCC) research. METHODS: (1) We identified 25 clinically significant CCC articles published by MMP between 2005 and 2014; we determined whether these articles were preceded by presentation by MMP at an SM. (2) We examined the changing civilian-military mix of publications on "damage control resuscitation" (DCR). (3) We analyzed the number of presentations by MMP each year at the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. (4) We reviewed whether past presidents of the AAST (for 1992-2014) had military experience. RESULTS: (1) Ninety-two percent of the CCC articles were previously presented at an SM; 66% were presented at civilian association venues such as AAST. (2) DCR was first described in 2006; the civilian-military mix of publications rose steadily from 0 in 2006 to 80% in 2014. (3) The number of MMP oral presentations at AAST peaked during 2005 to 2007 and has declined to one to two per year since 2012. (4) Thirty-three percent of recent AAST presidents had military experience, versus 100% for the previous era. CONCLUSION: Recent conflicts led to intense civilian-military collaboration in CCC research and to the spread of ideas such as DCR from military to civilian care. However, long-term trends (e.g., declining rates of military service nationally) place such collaboration at risk. Vigorous efforts to foster the vital civilian-military link in CCC are needed. PMID: 26406434 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2015
  • Citation: Cancio LC, Rasmussen TE, Cannon JW, Dubick MA. The vital civilian-military link in combat casualty care research: Impact of attendance at scientific conferences. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2015 Oct;79(4 Suppl 2):S221-6.

Frequent binge drinking after combat-acquired traumatic brain injury among active duty military personnel with a past year combat deployment.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether combat-acquired traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with postdeployment frequent binge drinking among a random sample of active duty military personnel. PARTICIPANTS: Active duty military personnel who returned home within the past year from deployment to a combat theater of operations and completed a survey health assessment (N = 7155). METHODS: Cross-sectional observational study with multivariate analysis of responses to the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel, an anonymous, random, population-based assessment of the armed forces. MAIN MEASURES: Frequent binge drinking: 5 or more drinks on the same occasion, at least once per week, in the past 30 days. TBI-AC: self-reported altered consciousness only; loss of consciousness (LOC) of less than 1 minute (TBI-LOC <1); and LOC of 1 minute or greater (TBI-LOC 1+) after combat injury event exposure. RESULTS: Of active duty military personnel who had a past year combat deployment, 25.6% were frequent binge drinkers and 13.9% reported experiencing a TBI on the deployment, primarily TBI-AC (7.5%). In regression models adjusting for demographics and positive screen for posttraumatic stress disorder, active duty military personnel with TBI had increased odds of frequent binge drinking compared with those with no injury exposure or without TBI: TBI-AC (adjusted odds ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.84); TBI-LOC 1+ (adjusted odds ratio, 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-2.79). CONCLUSIONS: Traumatic brain injury was significantly associated with past month frequent binge drinking after controlling for posttraumatic stress disorder, combat exposure, and other covariates.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Federal government department, agency, or organization, other than the Department of Defense
  • Release Date/Publication: September 01, 2012
  • Citation: Adams RS, Larson MJ, Corrigan JD, Horgan CM, Williams TV. Frequent binge drinking after combat-acquired traumatic brain injury among active duty military personnel with a past year combat deployment. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2012 Sep-Oct;27(5):349-60.

Embedded fragments from U.S. military personnel--chemical analysis and potential health implications.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The majority of modern war wounds are characterized by high-energy blast injuries containing a wide range of retained foreign materials of a metallic or composite nature. Health effects of retained fragments range from local or systemic toxicities to foreign body reactions or malignancies, and dependent on the chemical composition and corrosiveness of the fragments in vivo. Information obtained by chemical analysis of excised fragments can be used to guide clinical decisions regarding the need for fragment removal, to develop therapeutic interventions, and to better anticipate future medical problems from retained fragment related injuries. In response to this need, a new U.S Department of Defense (DoD) directive has been issued requiring characterization of all removed fragments to provide a database of fragment types occurring in combat injuries. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to determine the chemical composition of retained embedded fragments removed from injured military personnel, and to relate results to histological findings in tissue adjacent to fragment material. METHODS: We describe an approach for the chemical analysis and characterization of retained fragments and adjacent tissues, and include case examples describing fragments containing depleted uranium (DU), tungsten (W), lead (Pb), and non-metal foreign bodies composed of natural and composite materials. Fragments obtained from four patients with penetrating blast wounds to the limbs were studied employing a wide range of chemical and microscopy techniques. Available adjacent tissues from three of the cases were histologically, microscopically, and chemically examined. The physical and compositional properties of the removed foreign material surfaces were examined with energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and confocal laser Raman microspectroscopy (CLRM). Quantitative chemical analysis of both fragments and available tissues was conducted employing ICP-MS. RESULTS: Over 800 fragments have been characterized and included as part of the Joint Pathology Center Embedded Fragment Registry. Most fragments were obtained from penetrating wounds sustained to the extremities, particularly soft tissue injuries. The majority of the fragments were primarily composed of a single metal such as iron, copper, or aluminum with traces of antimony, titanium, uranium, and lead. One case demonstrated tungsten in both the fragment and the connected tissue, together with lead. Capsular tissue and fragments from a case from the 1991 Kuwait conflict showed evidence of uranium that was further characterized by uranium isotopic ratios analysis to contain depleted uranium. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides a systematic approach for obtaining a full chemical characterization of retained embedded fragments. Given the vast number of combat casualties with retained fragments, it is expected that fragment analysis will have significant implications for the optimal short and long-term care of wounded service members.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Joint Pathology Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Agency, office or organization under authority of the Sec Def (not affiliated to Army, Navy, or Air Force)
  • Release Date/Publication: January 01, 2014
  • Citation: Centeno JA, Rogers DA, van der Voet GB, Fornero E, Zhang L et. al. Embedded fragments from U.S. military personnel--chemical analysis and potential health implications. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Jan 23;11(2):1261-78.

Race/ethnicity and HAART initiation in a military HIV infected cohort.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Prior studies have suggested that HAART initiation may vary by race/ethnicity. Utilizing the U.S. military healthcare system, which minimizes confounding from healthcare access, we analyzed whether timing of HAART initiation and the appropriate initiation of primary prophylaxis among those at high risk for pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) varies by race/ethnicity. METHODS: Participants in the U.S. Military HIV Natural History Study from 1998-2009 who had not initiated HAART before 1998 and who, based on DHHS guidelines, had a definite indication for HAART (CD4 <200, AIDS event or severe symptoms; Group A), an indication to consider HAART (including CD4 <350; Group B) or electively started HAART (CD4 >350; Group C) were analyzed for factors associated with HAART initiation. In a secondary analysis, participants were also evaluated for factors associated with starting primary PCP prophylaxis within four months of a CD4 count <200 cells/mm3. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare those who started vs. delayed therapy; comparisons were expressed as odds ratios (OR). RESULTS: 1262 participants were evaluated in the analysis of HAART initiation (A = 208, B = 637, C = 479 [62 participants were evaluated in both Groups A and B]; 94% male, 46% African American, 40% Caucasian). Race/ethnicity was not associated with HAART initiation in Groups A or B. In Group C, African American race/ethnicity was associated with lower odds of initiating HAART (OR 0.49, p = 0.04). Race and ethnicity were also not associated with the initiation of primary PCP prophylaxis among the 408 participants who were at risk. CONCLUSIONS: No disparities in the initiation of HAART or primary PCP prophylaxis according to race/ethnicity were seen among those with an indication for therapy. Among those electively initiating HAART at the highest CD4 cell counts, African American race/ethnicity was associated with decreased odds of starting. This suggests that free healthcare can potentially overcome some of the observed disparities in HIV care, but that unmeasured factors may contribute to differences in elective care decisions.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Agency, office or organization under authority of the Sec Def (not affiliated to Army, Navy, or Air Force)
  • Release Date/Publication: January 01, 2014
  • Citation: Johnson EN, Roediger MP, Landrum ML, Crum-Cianflone NF, Weintrob AC, Ganesan A, et. al. Race/ethnicity and HAART initiation in a military HIV infected cohort. AIDS Res Ther. 2014 Jan 24;11(1):10.

A comparison of obesity prevalence: military health system and United States populations, 2009-2012.

Study

Abstract

Overweight and obesity prevalence has increased over the past 30 years. Few studies have looked at the enrolled Military Health System (MHS) population (2.2 million per year). This descriptive study examined trends in overweight and obesity in both children and adults from fiscal years 2009 to 2012 and compared them to the U.S. population. Prevalence in MHS children decreased over time for overweight (14.2-13.8%) and obesity (11.7-10.9%). Active duty adults showed an increase in overweight prevalence (52.7-53.4%) and a decrease in obesity prevalence (18.9-18.3%). For nonactive duty, both overweight and obesity prevalence remained relatively unchanged around 33%. For both children and adults, overweight and obesity prevalence increased with age, except for obesity in the nonactive duty ≥ 65 subgroup. When compared to the United States by gender and age, MHS children generally had a lower overweight and obesity prevalence, active duty adults had higher overweight and lower obesity prevalence, and nonactive duty adults had comparable overweight and obesity prevalence, except for obesity in both men in the 40 to 59 subgroup and women in ≥ 60 subgroup. More research on the MHS population is needed to identify risk factors and modifiable health behaviors that could defeat the disease of obesity.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Air Force
  • Sponsoring Office: United States Air Force Medical Support Agency
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Air Force
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2014
  • Citation: Eilerman PA, Herzog CM, Luce BK, Chao SY, Walker SM, Zarzabal LA, Carnahan DH. A comparison of obesity prevalence: military health system and United States populations, 2009-2012. Mil Med. 2014 May;179(5):462-70.

Race and vaginal birth after cesarean delivery in a military population.

Study

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to determine if race is associated with vaginal birth after cesarean delivery (VBAC) success in a military population. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted examining women with a history of at least one prior cesarean delivery who delivered at a single tertiary care military treatment facility. Data were collected pertaining to maternal demographics, medical and obstetric history, antepartum complications, intrapartum course, delivery mode, and maternal outcomes. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to determine the association of race and VBAC success. RESULTS: Four hundred seventy-six charts were reviewed from 2004 to 2011. African American women were more likely to require a cesarean delivery (P<.05) even after adjusting for potentially confounding factors. There was no difference in maternal morbidity between the racial groups. CONCLUSIONS: In a health care system with equal access, racial disparities remain. The effect of social factors that may influence such a disparity are thought to be attenuated in a military population. However, in our study, African American women were still significantly more likely to fail a VBAC attempt as compared with non-African American women. Race had no influence on morbidity, although this study was not powered to examine morbidity as a primary outcome.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Navy
  • Sponsoring Office: Naval Medical Center San Diego
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2014
  • Citation: Brankin C, Stratton S, Piszczek C, You W. Race and vaginal birth after cesarean delivery in a military population. Obstet Gynecol. 2014 May;123 Suppl 1:139S.

Prevalence of eosinophilic esophagitis in a United States military health-care population.

Study

Abstract

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a rapidly emerging chronic immune-mediated condition affecting children and adults, both genders, and all races. A large variation in the prevalence of EoE exists in the literature. The aim of this study is to establish the prevalence of EoE in a military health-care population in the United States using a comprehensive electronic medical record search. Using the International Classification for Diseases-9 code for EoE (530.13), the total number of EoE patients enrolled in the military health-care system from October 1, 2008 to September 30, 2009 including active-duty military, dependents of military personnel, and retirees were identified. For each case of EoE identified, demographic data (age, gender, and race) and geographic location was obtained. The overall prevalence of EoE was calculated as well as the prevalence within subgroups. The geographic regional locations were reported per the U.S. Census Bureau regions (Northeast, South, Midwest, and West). A total of 987 EoE patients were identified from 10 180 515 military health-care beneficiaries, establishing an overall prevalence of 9.7 per 100 000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.1-10.3). Seven hundred twenty-eight out of 7 707 372 adult patients were identified, establishing a prevalence of 9.5 per 100 000 (95% CI 8.8-10.1). Two hundred fifty-nine out of 2 473 143 pediatric patients were identified, establishing a prevalence of 10.5/100 000 (95% CI 9.2-11.8). EoE was more prevalent in males (odds ratio [OR] 2.03 [95% CI 1.78-2.32]) and higher in Caucasian versus African Americans (18.1 vs. 5.2/100 000, OR 3.47 [95% CI 2.40-5.03]). EoE was more prevalent in the Western region of the United States compared with the Northeast, South, and Midwest regions, with a prevalence of 11.9 versuss 5.2, 9.6, and 9.2 per 100 000, respectively. When comparing Northern with Southern states, there was an increased prevalence in the North (10.9 vs. 7.2/100 000, P < 0.05). In this large nationwide study, increase in prevalence of EoE was seen in younger adults, with a higher prevalence in Caucasians. Geographically, the western United States had a significantly higher prevalence with a slightly higher prevalence in the Northern latitude.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center/Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2014
  • Citation: Ally MR, Maydonovitch CL, Betteridge JD, Veerappan GR, Moawad FJ. Prevalence of eosinophilic esophagitis in a United States military health-care population. Dis Esophagus. 2014 May 15.

Changes in Meeting Vigorous Physical Activity Guidelines After Discharge From the Military.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Understanding physical activity (PA) after discharge from the military can inform theory on the role of habit and reinforcement in behavior maintenance and has implications for this population's future health. METHODS: Using data from 28,866 Millennium Cohort Study participants (n=3782 of whom were discharged during the years between assessments), we: 1) investigated changes in meeting federal PA Guidelines for moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA) following military discharge, and 2) determined predictors of meeting these Guidelines after discharge. RESULTS: MVPA declined more in those who were discharged than those who were not (-17.8 percentage points vs. -2.7 percentage points), with greater declines in former active-duty personnel, those who had deployed with combat exposures, had 14-25 years of service, and had been discharged more recently (>2 years prior). In those who were discharged, being normal or overweight (vs. obese), and a nonsmoker or former smoker (vs. current smoker) were positively associated with meeting MVPA Guidelines at follow-up, while meeting MVPA Guidelines at baseline and depression were inversely associated. CONCLUSIONS: Reductions in MVPA were substantial and unexpected. Increased understanding of transitional periods that may benefit from interventions to mitigate declines in PA will help prevent excess weight gain and physical inactivity-associated health consequences.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Undetermined
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2014
  • Citation: Littman A, Jacobson IG, Boyko EJ, Smith TC. Changes in Meeting Vigorous Physical Activity Guidelines After Discharge From the Military. J Phys Act Health. 2014 May 9.
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