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Military Health System Studies Inventory Tool

Welcome to the Military Health System Studies Inventory Tool (MSIT). Military Health System (MHS) data are used by Department of Defense, Veterans Administration, and academic health professionals and scientists to implement health care studies. These studies reflect the MHS interest to rigorously assess and improve our beneficiaries’ access to the high quality health care services they need. Additionally, these studies are frequently used to develop or improve MHS policy and often adopt useful, relevant comparisons to the national health care experience.

The MSIT allows easy review of recent studies that are either conducted or sponsored by the MHS, or accomplished using datasets developed or maintained by the Defense Health Agency for administrative, operational, or research purposes. The studies within this website represent important contributions of the MHS to the national health care dialogue and reflect our capacity to tackle the challenging issues needed to support evidence-informed health policy. Thank you for your interest in them.

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Surveillance snapshot: states with the most pertussis diagnoses among service members and other beneficiaries of the Military Health System, January 2012-June 2014.

Study

Abstract

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, so far in 2014, reported cases of pertussis in the U.S. have increased 24% over the previous year; by June 16, a total of 9,964 cases of pertussis had been reported by 50 states and the District of Columbia. On June 13, the California Department of Public Health announced that the state was experiencing a pertussis (“whooping cough”) epidemic. As of June 10, a total of 3,458 cases had been reported in the state; this number of pertussis cases exceeds the number of cases reported in the entire year in 2013. Th e MSMR has previously reported on spatiotemporal clusters of pertussis in the military that were associated with outbreaks in neighboring non-military communities; this association was clearly demonstrated during a previous 2010 outbreak in California. Between January 2012 and June 2014, the greatest number of pertussis cases (both confi rmed and probable) diagnosed in military benefi ciaries occurred in California, Texas, Washington, Virginia, and Florida (Figure); 90 cases have been diagnosed in California since January 2014, which is more than was reported in all of 2012 (n=68) or 2013 (n=89).

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: June 01, 2014
  • Citation: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC). Surveillance snapshot: states with the most pertussis diagnoses among service members and other beneficiaries of the Military Health System, January 2012-June 2014. MSMR. 2014 Jun;21(6):18.

Effects of personal and occupational stress on injuries in a young, physically active population: a survey of military personnel.

Study

Abstract

The aim of this study was to document risk factors for any injury and sports- and exercise-related injuries, including personal and occupational stress among active duty service members (SMs) in the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. A total of 10,692 SMs completed the April 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Members. The survey asked about demographics, personal stress and occupational stress, injuries from any cause, and participation in sports- and exercise- related activities in the past year. The survey used a complex sampling procedure to create a representative sample of SMs. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations of injury outcomes with potential risk factors. 49% of SMs sought medical care for an injury in the past year and 25% sustained a sports- and exercise-related activities injury. Odds of injury were higher for the Army and Marine Corps than for the Air Force or Navy. This survey showed that higher personal and occupational stress was associated with higher risks of injury. SMs who experienced higher levels of personal or occupational stress reported higher risks of injuries. The effects of stress reduction programs on injury risks should be evaluated in military and other young physically active populations.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2014
  • Citation: Bedno S, Hauret K, Loringer K, Kao TC, Mallon T, Jones B. Effects of personal and occupational stress on injuries in a young, physically active population: a survey of military personnel. Mil Med. 2014 Nov;179(11):1311-8.

REPORT TO CONGRESS, NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2013 (HR-4310), SECTION 737, STUDY ON INCIDENCE OF BREAST CANCER AMONG MEMBERS OF ARMED FORCES SERVING ON ACTIVE DUTY

Study

Abstract

The Department of Defense (DoD), Defense Health Agency submits this report in accordance with the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (HR 4310), section 737, that calls on The Secretary of Defense to conduct a study on the incidence of breast cancer among members of the Armed Forces. The findings from this study indicate that breast cancer incidence among active service members is a rare event. The female breast cancer incidence rate among this population has not changed significantly across the study period, 2000 through 2010, and the age-adjusted incidence rate is significantly lower over that time period when compared with national incidence rates reported by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Approximately 72% of all breast cancer patients are first diagnosed at stages 0, I or II, which suggests that the Department’s outreach efforts to promote awareness and use of screening services have been effective for detecting tumors early. Upon detection, the service member has access to robust treatment options that reflect evidenced-based clinical practices and cutting-edge technologies offered in nationally-accredited cancer programs within the Military Health System. Since TRICARE has a process to assimilate emerging cancers technologies, medications, and practice into the benefit, the need for changes to law or policy are not apparent for the DoD to sustain a high level of commitment to quality cancer care.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Congressionally Mandated: Yes
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: June 01, 2014
  • Citation: Williams TV, AFHSC, JPC, NMCPHC, WRNMMC, Brandeis University, Axiom Resource Management, Inc.

Risk factors for colostomy in military colorectal trauma: a review of 867 patients.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Limited data exist examining the use of fecal diversion in combatants from modern armed conflicts. Characterization of factors leading to colostomy creation is an initial step toward optimizing and individualizing combat casualty care. METHODS: A retrospective review of the US Department of Defense Trauma Registry database was performed for all US and coalition troops with colorectal injuries sustained during combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan over 8 years. Colostomy rate, anatomic injury location, mechanism of injury, demographic data, and initial physiologic parameters were examined. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. RESULTS: We identified 867 coalition military personnel with colorectal injuries. The overall colostomy rate was 37%. Rectal injuries had the highest diversion rate (56%), followed by left-sided (41%) and right-sided (20%) locations (P < .0001). Those with gunshot wounds (GSW) underwent diversion more often than blast injuries (43% vs 31% respectively, P < .0008). Injury Severity Score ≥16 (41% vs 30%; P = .0018) and damage control surgery (DCS; 48.2% vs 31.4%; P < .0001) were associated with higher diversion rates. On multivariate analysis, significant predictors for colostomy creation were injury location: Rectal versus left colon (odds ratio [OR], 2.2), rectal versus right colon (OR, 7.5), left versus right colon (OR, 3.4), GSW (OR, 2.0), ISS ≥ 16 (OR, 1.7), and DCS (OR, 1.6). CONCLUSION: In this exploratory study of 320 combat-related colostomies, distal colon and rectal injuries continue to be diverted at higher rates independent of other comorbidities. Additional outcomes-directed research is needed to determine whether such operative management is beneficial in all patients

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Army
  • Release Date/Publication: June 01, 2014
  • Citation: Watson JD, Aden JK, Engel JE, Rasmussen TE, Glasgow SC. Risk factors for colostomy in military colorectal trauma: a review of 867 patients. Surgery. 2014 Jun;155(6):1052-61.

Military traumatic brain injury: a review.

Study

Abstract

Military mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) differs from civilian injury in important ways. Although mTBI sustained in both military and civilian settings are likely to be underreported, the combat theater presents additional obstacles to reporting and accessing care. The impact of blast forces on the nervous system may differ from nonblast mechanisms, mTBI although studies comparing the neurologic and cognitive sequelae in mTBI survivors have not provided such evidence. However, emotional distress appears to figure prominently in symptoms following military mTBI. This review evaluates the extant literature with an eye towards future research directions.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: June 01, 2014
  • Citation: Chapman JC, Diaz-Arrastia R. Military traumatic brain injury: a review. Alzheimers Dement. 2014 Jun;10(3 Suppl):S97-104.

Self-reported sexually transmitted infections and sexual risk behaviors in the U.S. Military: how sex influences risk.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are prevalent in the U.S. military. However, there are limited data on risk-factor differences between sexes. METHODS: We used data from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors among active duty military personnel to identify risk factors for self-reported STIs within the past 12 months and multiple sexual partners among sexually active unmarried service members. RESULTS: There were 10,250 active duty personnel, mostly white (59.3%) aged 21 to 25 years (42.6%). The prevalence of any reported STI in the past 12 months was 4.2% for men and 6.9% for women. One-fourth of men and 9.3% of women reported 5 or more sexual partners in the past 12 months. Binge drinking, illicit substance use, and unwanted sexual contact were associated with increased report of sexual partners among both sexes. Family/personal-life stress and psychological distress influenced number of partnerships more strongly for women than for men (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR]=1.58, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]=1.18-2.12 and AOR=1.41, 95% CI=1.14-1.76, respectively). After adjusting for potential confounders, we found that the report of multiple sexual partners was significantly associated with the report of an STI among men (AOR, 5.87 [95% CI, 3.70-9.31], for ≥5 partners; AOR, 2.35 [95% CI, 1.59-3.49], for 2-4 partners) and women (AOR, 4.78 [95% CI, 2.12-10.80], for ≥5 partners; AOR, 2.35 [95% CI, 1.30-4.25], for 2-4 partners). CONCLUSIONS: Factors associated with the report of increasing sexual partnerships and report of an STI differed by sex. Sex-specific intervention strategies may be most effective in mitigating the factors that influence risky sexual behaviors among military personnel.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Undetermined
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: June 01, 2014
  • Citation: Stahlman S, Javanbakht M, Cochran S, Hamilton AB, Shoptaw S, Gorbach PM. Self-reported sexually transmitted infections and sexual risk behaviors in the U.S. Military: how sex influences risk. Sex Transm Dis. 2014 Jun;41(6):359-64

Compliance with antimalarial chemoprophylaxis recommendations for wounded United States military personnel admitted to a military treatment facility.

Study

Abstract

Malaria chemoprophylaxis is used as a preventive measure in military personnel deployed to malaria-endemic countries. However, limited information is available on compliance with chemoprophylaxis among trauma patients during hospitalization and after discharge. Therefore, we assessed antimalarial primary chemoprophylaxis and presumptive antirelapse therapy (primaquine) compliance among wounded United States military personnel after medical evacuation from Afghanistan (June 2009-August 2011) to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Landstuhl, Germany, and then to three U.S. military hospitals. Among admissions at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, 74% of 2,540 patients were prescribed primary chemoprophylaxis and < 1% were prescribed primaquine. After transfer of 1,331 patients to U.S. hospitals, 93% received primary chemoprophylaxis and 33% received primaquine. Of 751 trauma patients with available post-admission data, 42% received primary chemoprophylaxis for four weeks, 33% received primaquine for 14 days, and 17% received both. These antimalarial chemoprophylaxis prescription rates suggest that improved protocols to continue malaria chemoprophylaxis in accordance with force protection guidelines are needed.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center/Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: June 01, 2014
  • Citation: Rini EA, et.al., . Compliance with antimalarial chemoprophylaxis recommendations for wounded United States military personnel admitted to a military treatment facility. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2014 Jun;90(6):1113-6.

The association of percentage energy from fat and colon cancer risk among members of the US military.

Study

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies have previously reported an association between high fat intake and colon cancer risk. However, findings have generally been inconclusive. This study aimed to investigate the association between fat as a percentage of energy intake and colon cancer risk. Study subjects included 215 cases and 215 matched controls identified by the Defense Medical Surveillance System. Percentage energy from fat (Pfat) was estimated using a short dietary screener developed by the National Cancer Institute for two time periods: the year before the first blood draw and the year before colon cancer diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between colon cancer risk and Pfat. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Compared with the lowest quartile of Pfat, the adjusted odds of having colon cancer were 2.00 (95% CI 0.96-4.18), 2.83 (95% CI 1.41-5.66), and 3.37 (95% CI 1.58-7.17), respectively, for the second, third, and highest quartiles in the year before cancer diagnosis. Similar results were observed for Pfat at an earlier time point. Our findings suggest a positive association between Pfat and colon cancer in the US military population.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: July 01, 2014
  • Citation: Shao S, Kao TC, Eckhaus J, Bourgeois J, Perera K, Zhu K. The association of percentage energy from fat and colon cancer risk among members of the US military. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2014 Jul 29.

Associations between mental health disorders and body mass index among military personnel.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine if overweight or obesity is associated with mental health disorder (MHD) symptoms among military personnel Methods: Secondary analysis using the 2005 Department of Defense Health Related Behaviors Survey (N = 15,195). Standard Body Mass Index (BMI) categories were used to classify participants' body composition. RESULTS: For women, obesity was associated with symptoms of serious psychological distress (SPD), post-traumatic stress disorder, and depression. For men, obesity and overweight was associated with symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder and SPD, respectively. Self-reported high personal stress was the strongest predictor of MHD symptoms and suicide attempts. CONCLUSION: Self-reported stress was a stronger predictor of MHD symptoms than BMI. There is potential value in screening personnel for personal stress as a MHD risk factor.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Army
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: July 01, 2014
  • Citation: Smith TJ, White A, Hadden L, Young AJ, Marriott BP. Associations between mental health disorders and body mass index among military personnel. Am J Health Behav. 2014 Jul;38(4):529-40.

Trends in rates of chronic obstructive respiratory conditions among US militarypersonnel, 2001-2013.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The US military has been continuously engaged in combat operations since 2001. Assessing trends in respiratory health diagnoses during this time of prolonged military conflict can provide insight into associated changes in the burden of pulmonary conditions in the US military population. PURPOSE: To estimate and evaluate trends in rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases in the active duty US military population from 2001 through 2013. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of ambulatory medical encounter diagnosis data corresponding to a study base of over 18 million personnel-years was performed to estimate average rates and evaluate temporal trends in rates of chronic obstructive lung conditions. Differences in rates and the time trends of those rates were evaluated by branch of military service, military occupation, and military rank. RESULTS: During the 13-year period, we observed 482,670 encounters for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and allied conditions (ICD-9 490-496) among active duty military personnel. Over half (57%) of the medical encounters in this category were for a diagnosis of bronchitis, not specified as acute or chronic. There was a statistically significant 17.2% average increase in the annual rates of this nonspecific bronchitis diagnosis from 2001-2009 (95% CI: 13.5% to 21.1%), followed by a 23.6% annual decline in the rates from 2009 through 2013 (95% CI: 8.6% to 36.2%). Statistically significant declines were observed in the rates of chronic bronchitis over time (annual percentage decline: 3.1%; 95% CI: 0.5% to 6.6%) and asthma (annual percentage decline: 5.9%; 95% CI: 2.5% to 9.2%). A 1.6% annual increase in the rate of emphysema and a 0.1% increase in the rate of chronic airways obstruction (not elsewhere classified) over the study period were not statistically significant (P>.05). The magnitude of the estimated rates of these chronic obstructive lung conditions, and, to a lesser extent, the temporal trends in these rates, were sensitive to the requirement that there be persistence of the diagnosis evidenced in the medical record in order qualify as an incident case.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Army
  • Sponsoring Office: US Army Public Health Command
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Army
  • Release Date/Publication: July 01, 2014
  • Citation: Abraham JH, Clark LL, Sharkey JM, Baird CP. Trends in rates of chronic obstructive respiratory conditions among US military personnel, 2001-2013. US Army Med Dep J. 2014 Jul-Sep:33-43.

Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military Volume 1. Design of the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

Study

Abstract

In early 2014, the Department of Defense Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office asked the RAND National Defense Research Institute to conduct an independent assessment of sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the military — an assessment last conducted in 2012 by the department itself with its Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Personnel. This volume documents the methodology used in the resulting RAND Military Workplace Study, which invited close to 560,000 service members to participate in a survey fielded in August and September of 2014. It describes the survey methods, how the new questionnaire was designed, and how sampling, recruitment, and analytic weighting were pursued. It also includes the entire survey instrument.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: DoD agency, office, or organization other than the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Defense Health Agency
  • Sponsoring Office: National Development and Research Institutes, Inc.
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Federally Funded Research and Development Center
  • Release Date/Publication: July 01, 2014
  • Citation: Rand Corporation, National Defense Research Institute

The Experience, Expression, and Control of Anger Following Traumatic Brain Injury in a Military Sample.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on the experience and expression of anger in a military sample. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 661 military personnel with a history of TBI and 1204 military personnel with no history of TBI. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, between-group design, using multivariate analysis of variance. MAIN MEASURE: State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2). RESULTS: Participants with a history of TBI had higher scores on the STAXI-2 than controls and were 2 to 3 times more likely than the participants in the control group to have at least 1 clinically significant elevation on the STAXI-2. Results suggested that greater time since injury (ie, months between TBI and assessment) was associated with lower scores on the STAXI-2 State Anger scale. CONCLUSION: Although the results do not take into account confounding psychiatric conditions and cannot address causality, they suggest that a history of TBI increases the risk of problems with the experience, expression, and control of anger. This bolsters the need for proper assessment of anger when evaluating TBI in a military cohort.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: February 01, 2014
  • Citation: Bailie JM, Cole WR, Ivins B, Boyd C, Lewis S, Neff J, Schwab K. The Experience, Expression, and Control of Anger Following Traumatic Brain Injury in a Military Sample. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2014 Feb 28.

Outcomes after bankart repair in a military population: predictors for surgical revision and long-term disability.

Study

Abstract

PURPOSE: To quantify the rate of surgical failure after anterior shoulder stabilization procedures, as well as to identify demographic and surgical risk factors associated with poor outcomes. METHODS: All Army patients undergoing arthroscopic or open Bankart repair for shoulder instability were isolated from the Military Health System Management Analysis and Reporting Tool between 2003 and 2010. Demographic variables (age, gender) and surgical variables (treatment facility volume, admission status, surgical technique) were extracted. Rates of surgical failure, defined as subsequent revision surgery or medical discharge with persistent shoulder complaints, were recorded from the electronic medical record and US Army Physical Disability Agency database. Risk factor analysis was performed with univariate t tests, χ(2) tests, and a multivariable logistic regression model with failure as the outcome. RESULTS: A total of 3,854 patients underwent Bankart repair during the study period, with most procedures having been performed arthroscopically (n = 3,230, 84%) and on an outpatient basis (n = 3,255, 84%). Patients were predominately men (n = 3,531, 92%), and the mean age was 28.0 years (SD, 7.5 years). A total of 193 patients (5.0%) underwent revision stabilization whereas 339 patients (8.8%) were medically discharged with complaints of shoulder instability, for a total combined failure rate of 13.8% (n = 532). Univariate analyses showed no significant effect for gender; however, younger age, higher facility volume, open repair, and inpatient status were significant factors associated with subsequent surgical failure. Multivariable analyses confirmed that young age (odds ratio [OR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91 to 0.96; P < .001), open repair (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.75; P = .001), and inpatient status (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.84; P = .004) were independently associated with failure by revision surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Young age remains a significant risk factor for surgical failure after Bankart repair. Patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair had a significantly lower surgical failure rate (4.5%) than patients who underwent open anterior stabilization (7.7%). Despite advances in surgical technique, 1 in 20 military service members required revision surgery after failed primary stabilization in this study.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Army
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Army
  • Release Date/Publication: February 01, 2014
  • Citation: Waterman BR, Burns TC, McCriskin B, Kilcoyne K, Cameron KL, Owens BD. Outcomes after bankart repair in a military population: predictors for surgical revision and long-term disability. Arthroscopy. 2014 Feb;30(2):172-7.

Mental health outcomes in US and UK military personnel returning from Iraq.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Research of military personnel who deployed to the conflicts in Iraq or Afghanistan has suggested that there are differences in mental health outcomes between UK and US military personnel. AIMS: To compare the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), hazardous alcohol consumption, aggressive behaviour and multiple physical symptoms in US and UK military personnel deployed to Iraq. METHOD: Data were from one US (n = 1560) and one UK (n = 313) study of post-deployment military health of army personnel who had deployed to Iraq during 2007-2008. Analyses were stratified by high- and low-combat exposure. RESULTS: Significant differences in combat exposure and sociodemographics were observed between US and UK personnel; controlling for these variables accounted for the difference in prevalence of PTSD, but not in the total symptom level scores. Levels of hazardous alcohol consumption (low-combat exposure: odds ratio (OR) = 0.13, 95% CI 0.07-0.21; high-combat exposure: OR = 0.23, 95% CI 0.14-0.39) and aggression (low-combat exposure: OR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.19-0.68) were significantly lower in US compared with UK personnel. There was no difference in multiple physical symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in self-reported combat exposures explain most of the differences in reported prevalence of PTSD. Adjusting for self-reported combat exposures and sociodemographics did not explain differences in hazardous alcohol consumption or aggression.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Army
  • Sponsoring Office: United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Army
  • Release Date/Publication: March 01, 2014
  • Citation: Sundin J, Herrell RK, Hoge CW, Fear NT, Adler AB, Greenberg N, Riviere LA, Thomas JL, Wessely S, Bliese PD. Mental health outcomes in US and UK military personnel returning from Iraq. Br J Psychiatry. 2014 Mar;204(3):200-7.

Melanoma incidence rates in active duty military personnel compared with a population-based registry in the United States, 2000-2007.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to investigate whether incidence rates of malignant cutaneous melanoma in U.S. Department of Defense active duty military personnel differed from rates in the U.S. general population between 2000 and 2007. METHODS: The study population included active duty military personnel and the general population aged 18 to 56 years. Data were obtained from the U.S. Department of Defense medical data systems and from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results program. Melanoma risk was estimated by incidence rate ratios (IRRs). RESULTS: Melanoma risk was higher among active duty personnel than the general population (IRR = 1.62, 95% confidence interval = 1.40-1.86). Incidence rates were higher for white military personnel than for white rates in general population (36.89 and 23.05 per 100,000 person-years, respectively). Rates were also increased for military men and women compared with SEER (men, 25.32 and 16.53 per 100,000; women, 30.00 and 17.55 per 100,000). Air Force service personnel had the highest rates and Army had the lowest. CONCLUSION: Melanoma rates were marginally higher among active duty military personnel than the general population between 2000 and 2007.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Undetermined
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: March 01, 2014
  • Citation: Lea CS, Efird JT, Toland AE, Lewis DR, Phillips CJ. Melanoma incidence rates in active duty military personnel compared with a population-based registry in the United States, 2000-2007. Mil Med. 2014 Mar;179(3):247-53.
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