Back to Top Skip to main content

Military Health System Studies Inventory Tool

Welcome to the Military Health System Studies Inventory Tool (MSIT). Military Health System (MHS) data are used by Department of Defense, Veterans Administration, and academic health professionals and scientists to implement health care studies. These studies reflect the MHS interest to rigorously assess and improve our beneficiaries’ access to the high quality health care services they need. Additionally, these studies are frequently used to develop or improve MHS policy and often adopt useful, relevant comparisons to the national health care experience.

The MSIT allows easy review of recent studies that are either conducted or sponsored by the MHS, or accomplished using datasets developed or maintained by the Defense Health Agency for administrative, operational, or research purposes. The studies within this website represent important contributions of the MHS to the national health care dialogue and reflect our capacity to tackle the challenging issues needed to support evidence-informed health policy. Thank you for your interest in them.

We found 212 items resulting from your search.

Advanced Search Options

Specify Date Range (Optional)
Limit the Types of Content (Optional)

The role of performance validity tests in the assessment of cognitive functioning after military concussion: A replication and extension.

Study

Abstract

The current investigation is a replication and extension of a previously published study by Cooper, Vanderploeg, Armistead-Jehle, Lewis, and Bowles (2014) demonstrating that performance validity test scores accounted for more variance in cognitive testing among service members with a history of concussion than did demographic variables, etiology of and time since injury, and symptom severity. The present study included a sample of 142 active-duty service members evaluated following a suspected or confirmed history of mild traumatic brain injury. Participants completed a battery of neuropsychological measures that included scales of performance and symptom validity (specifically the Medical Symptom Validity Test, Nonverbal Medical Symptom Validity Test, and Personality Assessment Inventory). Among the factors considered in the current study, performance validity test results accounted for the most variance in cognitive test scores, above demographic, concussion history, symptom validity, and psychological distress variables. Performance validity test results were modestly related to symptom validity as measured by the Personality Assessment Inventory Negative Impression Management scale. In sum, the current results replicated the original Cooper et al. study and highlight the importance of including performance validity tests as part of neurocognitive evaluation, even in clinical contexts, within this population.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2015
  • Citation: Armistead-Jehle P, Cooper DB, Vanderploeg RD. The role of performance validity tests in the assessment of cognitive functioning after military concussion: A replication and extension. Appl Neuropsychol Adult. 2015 Nov 16:1-10.

Epidemiology of Exercise- and Sports-Related Injuries in a Population of Young, Physically Active Adults: A Survey of Military Servicemembers.

Study

Abstract

Numerous studies document the health benefits of a physically active lifestyle, but relatively few document the hazards of physical activity. Because of the requirement for physical fitness to complete their mission, the United States military services have a vested interest in understanding the benefits and risks of physical activity including exercise and sports. One of these risks is injury. Rates and proportion of injuries caused by exercise- and sports-related (ESR) activities have not been reported previously across the services. PURPOSE: The purposes of this population survey were to (1) document the rates and proportion of all injuries caused by ESR activities among military personnel, (2) compare rates across the military services, and (3) describe the causes and types of ESR injuries as well as associated days of limited activity. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. METHODS: The Defense Manpower Data Center administered the web-based 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Service Members to a random sample of active-duty personnel. In all, 10,692 servicemembers completed the survey, which included questions about injuries from any cause and from exercise and sports during the previous year. Responses were weighted to produce population estimates for injury rates (any injury and ESR injury). Percentage distributions were used to describe activities, injury types, days of limited activity, and contributing factors for ESR injuries. RESULTS: There were 49% of servicemembers who sustained an injury from any cause in the previous year; 25% had an ESR injury. Thus, 52% of all injuries were ESR injuries. ESR injury rates ranged from 20% for the Navy to 33% for the Marine Corps. Running accounted for 45% of ESR injuries. Forty percent of ESR injuries were sprains and strains. As an indicator of injury severity, 35% of ESR injuries required more than 2 weeks of limited activity. CONCLUSION: This study quantified the overall incidence of injuries and the large proportion that are caused by exercise and sports among military personnel, a population of healthy, physically active adults. Prevention strategies should focus on running, weight training, basketball, and football. Recommendations include adherence to evidence-based practices to reduce the occurrence of ESR injuries.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2015
  • Citation: Hauret KG, Bedno S, Loringer K, Kao TC, Mallon T, Jones BH. Epidemiology of Exercise- and Sports-Related Injuries in a Population of Young, Physically Active Adults: A Survey of Military Servicemembers. Am J Sports Med. 2015 Nov;43(11):2645-53.

Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Titers in Air Force Recruits: Below Herd Immunity Thresholds?

Study

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Preventable diseases like measles and mumps are occurring with increasing frequency in the U.S. despite the availability of an effective vaccine. Given concern that an outbreak may occur among military recruits, we compared serologic evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella among military recruits with known herd immunity thresholds and determined whether the current Department of Defense policy of presuming mumps immunity based on measles and rubella titers is reliable. METHODS: Serum antibody levels for measles, mumps, and rubella were obtained from all new recruits upon arrival at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, from 25 April 2013 through 24 April 2014. Seroprevalence of each disease was assessed by age and sex, and concordance between mumps titers and measles and rubella titers was calculated. Data analysis was performed in 2014-2015. RESULTS: Among 32,502 recruits, seroprevalences for measles, mumps, and rubella antibodies were 81.6%, 80.3%, and 82.1%, respectively. Of the 22,878 recruits seropositive for both measles and rubella antibodies, 87.7% were also seropositive for mumps. CONCLUSIONS: Seroprevalences for measles, mumps, and rubella antibodies among a large cohort of recruits entering U.S. Air Force basic training were generally lower than levels required to maintain herd immunity. In order to reduce the incidence of mumps infections, the Department of Defense should consider obtaining antibody titers for measles, mumps, and rubella and vaccinating all individuals susceptible to one or more of the viruses.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2015
  • Citation: Lewis PE, Burnett DG, Costello AA, Olsen CH, Tchandja JN, Webber BJ. Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Titers in Air Force Recruits: Below Herd Immunity Thresholds? Am J Prev Med. 2015 Nov;49(5):757-60.

Occupational differences in US Army suicide rates.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2015
  • Citation: Kessler RC, Stein MB, Bliese PD, Bromet EJ, Chiu WT, Cox KL, et.al. Occupational differences in US Army suicide rates. Psychol Med. 2015 Nov;45(15):3293-304.

Rates of acute respiratory illnesses of infectious and allergic etiologies after permanent changes of duty assignments, active component, U.S. Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, January 2005-September 2015.

Study

Abstract

Throughout history, acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) have disproportionately affected military populations, particularly those in recruit training camps. A similar dynamic can affect non-trainee military settings. When military members are reassigned, they often develop ARIs within the first weeks of their arrivals at their new assignments. To assess the natures and magnitudes of the risks associated with new assignments, this analysis compared the experiences of service members within their first full calendar months at new assignments and during the same months at the same locations 1 year later. The results do not support the hypothesis that ARIs of infectious etiologies consistently occur more frequently soon after arriving at new assignments compared to 1 year later at the same locations. In contrast, during two-thirds of the 117 months considered here, rates of ARIs of presumed allergic etiologies (e.g., allergic rhinitis, asthma) were higher during the first months of new assignments compared to 1 year later. The limitations of the study methodology as well as the possible implications of the findings are discussed.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2015
  • Citation: Brundage JF, et. al.,Rates of acute respiratory illnesses of infectious and allergic etiologies after permanent changes of duty assignments, active component, U.S. Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, January 2005-September 2015. MSMR. 2015 Nov;22(11):2-7

Increased risk of functional gastrointestinal sequelae after Clostridium difficile infection among active duty United States military personnel (1998-2010).

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Some acute enteric infections are associated with the development of functional gastrointestinal disorders, most commonly irritable bowel syndrome but also other functional and organic gastrointestinal sequelae. Clostridium difficile infection has increased in incidence and severity, however, few studies have evaluated functional disorders after this infection. METHODS: We evaluated the epidemiology and sequelae of C difficile in the US military population by using the US Department of Defense's Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center Defense Medical Ecounter Database. We then performed a retrospective cohort study of 891 active-duty US military personnel who developed C difficile from 1998 to 2010 and 3231 matched subjects who had not been exposed to C difficile. Subjects were identified based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification codes for C difficile disease. RESULTS: C difficile was associated independently with increased rate ratios (RRs) for incident irritable bowel syndrome (RR, 6.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-12.9), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (RR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.4-2.6), dyspepsia (RR, 3.3; 95%, 1.4-7.7), and constipation (RR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.3-3.7). Approximately 14.1% of subjects with C difficile later were identified with one of these functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGDs), compared with 6% of controls. Community- and health care-associated C difficile were associated at similar rates with these sequelae. Patients were at increased risk for FGDs within 3 months of a C difficile episode, with one additional case of FGD developing for every 12 diagnoses of C difficile. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of community- and health care-associated C difficile has increased in the US military population from 1998 through 2010. As for other gastrointestinal infections, C difficile disease is associated with clinically relevant functional sequelae in this military population.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Navy
  • Sponsoring Office: Naval Medical Research Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Navy
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2015
  • Citation: Gutiérrez RL, Riddle MS, Porter CK. Increased risk of functional gastrointestinal sequelae after Clostridium difficile infection among active duty United States military personnel (1998-2010). Gastroenterology. 2015 Nov;149(6):1408-14.

When, If Ever, Should Military Physicians Violate a Military Order to Give Medical Obligations Higher Priority?

Study

Abstract

Military care providers may face ethical conflicts when they must treat their own and enemy soldiers during combat and their resources are limited. Legally under the Geneva Convention, they are instructed to treat enemy soldiers equally, but in practice, providers still have some discretion. This article discusses this discretion and ethical frameworks and uncertainties that bear on these decisions. A case is presented in which this conflict arose. How the provider resolved this is reported.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2015
  • Citation: Howe EG. When, If Ever, Should Military Physicians Violate a Military Order to Give Medical Obligations Higher Priority? Mil Med. 2015 Nov;180(11):1118-9. ;180(11):1121-3.

Anger and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity in a Trauma-Exposed Military Population: Differences by Trauma Context and Gender.

Study

Abstract

Studies have found a stronger association between anger and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity in military populations than in nonmilitary populations. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain this difference: Military populations are more prone to anger than nonmilitary populations, and traumas experienced on deployment create more anger than nondeployment traumas. To examine these hypotheses, we evaluated the association between anger and PTSD severity among never-deployed military service members with nondeployment traumas (n = 226) and deployed service members with deployment traumas (n = 594) using linear regression. We further examined these associations stratified by gender. Bivariate associations between anger and PTSD severity were similar for nondeployment and deployment events; however, gender modified this association. For men, the association for deployment events was stronger than for nondeployment events (β = .18, r = .53 vs. β = .16, r = .37, respectively), whereas the reverse was true for women (deployment: β = .20, r = .42 vs. nondeployment: β = .25, r = .65). Among men, findings supported the hypothesis that deployment traumas produce stronger associations between PTSD and anger and are inconsistent with hypothesized population differences. In women, however, there was not a clear fit with either hypothesis.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2015
  • Citation: Worthen M, Rathod SD, Cohen G, Sampson L, Ursano R, Gifford R, et.al., Anger and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity in a Trauma-Exposed Military Population: Differences by Trauma Context and Gender. J Trauma Stress. 2015 Dec;28(6):539-46.

A prospective cohort study of treatment decision-making for prostate cancer following participation in a multidisciplinary clinic.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Patients diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) are presented with several treatment options of similar efficacy but varying side effects. Understanding how and why patients make their treatment decisions, as well as the effect of treatment choice on long-term outcomes, is critical to ensuring effective, patient-centered care. This study examined treatment decision-making in a racially diverse, equal-access, contemporary cohort of patients with PCa counseled on treatment options at a multidisciplinary clinic. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was initiated at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (formerly Walter Reed Army Medical Center) in 2006. Newly diagnosed patients with PCa were enrolled before attending a multidisciplinary clinic. Patients completed surveys preclinic and postclinic to assess treatment preferences, reasons for treatment choice, and decisional regret. RESULTS: As of January 2014, 925 patients with PCa enrolled in this study. Surgery (54%), external radiation (20%), and active surveillance (12%) were the most common primary treatments for patients with low- and intermediate-risk PCa, whereas patients with high-risk PCa chose surgery (34%) or external radiation with neoadjuvant hormones (57%). Treatment choice differed by age at diagnosis, race, comorbidity status, and calendar year in both univariable and multivariable analyses. Patients preferred to play an active role in the decision-making process and cited doctors at the clinic as the most helpful source of treatment-related information. Almost all patients reported satisfaction with their decision. CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the first prospective cohort studies to examine treatment decision-making in an equal-access, multidisciplinary clinic setting. Studies of this cohort would aid in understanding and improving the PCa decision-making process.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center/Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2015
  • Citation: Hurwitz LM, Cullen J, Elsamanoudi S, Kim DJ, Hudak J, Colston M, et.al., A prospective cohort study of treatment decision-making for prostate cancer following participation in a multidisciplinary clinic. Urol Oncol. 2015 Dec 15.

Unintended pregnancy among active-duty women in the United States military, 2011.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Unintended pregnancy among active-duty women in the United States military, 2011. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional data came from the 2011 Department of Defense Health Related Behaviors Survey of Active Duty Military Personnel; 9038 women provided data on unintended pregnancy. Unintended pregnancy rates were calculated for all women and by available background characteristics, including military branch, marital status (married versus unmarried), pay grade (enlisted versus officer) and deployment in the previous 12months. Multivariable logistic regression testing for associations between unintended pregnancy and subgroups was also performed. RESULTS: The unintended pregnancy rate was 72/1000 women. Married women (odds ratio (OR) 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-1.54) and enlisted women (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.99-3.69) had higher odds of reporting unintended pregnancy compared to their counterparts, as did women in the Navy (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.19-1.91) and Marine Corps (OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.92-2.95) compared to women in the Air Force. Unintended pregnancy rates did not differ between women who were deployed in the previous 12months and nondeployed women. Additionally, 10% of women who were deployed for 11-12months in 2011 reported an unintended pregnancy in the previous year, suggesting that their pregnancies occurred during deployment. CONCLUSION: Unintended pregnancy is higher in the military, including during deployment, compared to the general U.S. population (52/1000 women). All branches need to address the issue in a comprehensive manner including evidence-based provision of contraception and education among servicemembers. IMPLICATIONS: Unintended pregnancy is high in the military, including during deployment; further efforts to improve evidence-based provision of contraception and education are needed.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Undetermined
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2015
  • Citation: Grindlay K, Grossman D. Unintended pregnancy among active-duty women in the United States military, 2011. Contraception. 2015 Dec;92(6):589-95.

A Prognostic Model to Predict Mortality among Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients in the U.S. Military Health System.

Study

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Accurate prognosis assessment after non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) diagnosis is an essential step for making effective clinical decisions. This study is aimed to develop a prediction model with routinely available variables to assess prognosis in patients with NSCLC in the U.S. Military Health System. METHODS: We used the linked database from the Department of Defense's Central Cancer Registry and the Military Health System Data Repository. The data set was randomly and equally split into a training set to guide model development and a testing set to validate the model prediction. Stepwise Cox regression was used to identify predictors of survival. Model performance was assessed by calculating area under the receiver operating curves and construction of calibration plots. A simple risk scoring system was developed to aid quick risk score calculation and risk estimation for NSCLC clinical management. RESULTS: The study subjects were 5054 patients diagnosed with NSCLC between 1998 and 2007. Age, sex, tobacco use, tumor stage, histology, surgery, chemotherapy, peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and diabetes mellitus were identified as significant predictors of survival. Calibration showed high agreement between predicted and observed event rates. The area under the receiver operating curves reached 0.841, 0.849, 0.848, and 0.838 during 1, 2, 3, and 5 years, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first NSCLC prognosis model for quick risk assessment within the Military Health System. After external validation, the model can be translated into clinical use both as a web-based tool and through mobile applications easily accessible to physicians, patients, and researchers.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center/Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2015
  • Citation: Lin J, Carter CA, McGlynn KA, Zahm SH, Nations JA, Anderson WF, Shriver CD, Zhu K. A Prognostic Model to Predict Mortality among Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients in the U.S. Military Health System. J Thorac Oncol. 2015 Dec;10(12):1694-702.

Retrospective Analysis of Long-Term Outcomes After Combat Injury: A Hidden Cost of War.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: During the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, 52 087 service members have been wounded in combat. The long-term sequelae of these injuries have not been carefully examined. We sought to determine the relation between markers of injury severity and the subsequent development of hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: Retrospective cohort study of critically injured US military personnel wounded in Iraq or Afghanistan from February 1, 2002 to February 1, 2011. Patients were then followed until January 18, 2013. Chronic disease outcomes were assessed by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition codes and causes of death were confirmed by autopsy. From 6011 admissions, records were excluded because of missing data or if they were for an individual's second admission. Patients with a disease diagnosis of interest before the injury date were also excluded, yielding a cohort of 3846 subjects for analysis. After adjustment for other factors, each 5-point increment in the injury severity score was associated with a 6%, 13%, 13%, and 15% increase in incidence rates of hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease, respectively. Acute kidney injury was associated with a 66% increase in rates of hypertension and nearly 5-fold increase in rates of chronic kidney disease. CONCLUSIONS: In Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, the severity of combat injury was associated with the subsequent development of hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2015
  • Citation: Stewart IJ, Sosnov JA, Howard JT, Orman JA, Fang R, Morrow BD, Zonies DH, Bollinger M, Tuman C, Freedman BA, Chung KK. Retrospective Analysis of Long-Term Outcomes After Combat Injury: A Hidden Cost of War. Circulation. 2015 Dec 1;132(22):2126-33.

Risk factors for severe outcomes among members of the United States military hospitalized with pneumonia and influenza, 2000-2012.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The progression from hospitalization for a respiratory infection to requiring substantial supportive therapy is a key stage of the influenza severity pyramid. Respiratory infections are responsible for 300,000-400,000 medical encounters each year among US military personnel, some of which progress to severe acute respiratory infections. METHODS: We obtained data on 11,086 hospitalizations for pneumonia and influenza (P&I) among non-recruit US military service members during the period of 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2012. From these, we identified 512 P&I hospitalizations that progressed to severe episodes using standard case definitions. We evaluated the effect of demographic and occupational characteristics, co-morbid conditions, and history of influenza vaccination on the risk of a hospitalized P&I case becoming a severe case. We also evaluated the risk of a severe outcome and the length of time since influenza vaccination (within 180, 60, and 30 days). RESULTS: The median age of subjects at the time of the P&I episode was 32 years (range, 28-40) and subjects were predominantly male (89.5%). In a univariate analysis, demographic risk factors for a severe episode included service in the US Air Force (RR=1.6 relative to US Army, 95%CI 1.3-2.1), US Coast Guard (RR=2.1, 1.2-3.7) or US Navy (RR=1.4, 1.1-1.8). Being born in the US and recent influenza vaccination (within 180 days of episode) were protective against developing severe disease. Among co-morbid conditions, univariate risk factors for severe disease included chronic renal or liver disease (RR=4.98, 95%CI 4.1-6.1), diseases of the circulatory system (RR=3.1, 95%CI 2.6-3.7), diabetes mellitus (RR=2.3, 95%CI 1.5-3.6), obesity (RR=1.6, 95%CI 1.2-2.1), cancer (RR=1.6, 95%CI 1.3-2.0), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (RR=1.4, 95%CI 1.1-1.7). Although many of the risk factors found to be significant in univariate analysis were no longer significant under a multivariate analysis, receipt of any influenza vaccine within 180 days of episode remained protective (RR=0.81, 95%CI 0.67-0.99), while serving in the US Coast Guard (RR=1.9, 95%CI 1.1-3.4) or US Air Force (RR=1. 5, 95%CI 1.2-2.0), presence of renal or liver disease (RR=3.6, 95%CI 2.9-4.6), and diseases of the circulatory system (RR=2.2, 95%CI 1.8-2.8), remained significantly associated with a higher risk of developing severe disease. CONCLUSIONS: In a large cohort, after adjusting for many possible risk factors, influenza vaccination was protective against severe episodes among P&I hospitalizations. The service-specific (US Coast Guard or US Air Force) increased risk may represent some differences in data (e.g., coding or reporting practices) as opposed to genuine differences in physiological outcome. Our findings suggest that renal and liver disease as well as diseases of the circulatory system may contribute to influenza severity in this population independently of age and other potential comorbidities. These findings provide additional evidence for the prioritization of specific risk groups within the US military for influenza vaccination.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2015
  • Citation: Van Kerkhove MD, Cooper MJ, Cost AA, Sanchez JL, Riley S. Risk factors for severe outcomes among members of the United States military hospitalized with pneumonia and influenza, 2000-2012. Vaccine. 2015 Dec 8;33(49):6970-6.

Vaccine-associated reduction in symptom severity among patients with influenza A/H3N2 disease.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The moderate level of protection conferred by influenza vaccines is well-known, but the vaccine's ability to attenuate symptom severity among vaccinated individuals (i.e., vaccine failures) has not been established. METHODS: We enrolled otherwise healthy adults who presented with influenza-like illness (ILI) at five US military hospitals between 2009 and 2014. Influenza was diagnosed and subtyped by PCR. Individual and composite severity scores were compared between those who had vs. had not received the seasonal influenza vaccine >14 days prior to enrollment. RESULTS: A total of 155 cases of influenza (A/H1N1, n=69; A/H3N2, n=66; A/untyped, n=3; B, n=17) were identified, of whom 111 (72%; A/H1N1, n=44; A/H3N2, n=52; A/untyped, n=3; B, n=12) had been vaccinated. Women were significantly less likely to be vaccinated than men (49% vs. 89%; p<0.01). In multivariate analysis, vaccinated individuals were significantly less likely to report a fever >101°F (OR 0.24; 95% CI [0.10, 0.62]) and more likely to report myalgias (OR 3.31; 95% CI [1.22, 8.97]) than vaccinated individuals. Among patients with A/H3N2 infection, upper respiratory and total symptom severity scores were significantly lower for vaccinated patients during the first 2 days of illness, and differences in total symptom severity persisted over 7 days (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Differences across additional symptom categories (lower respiratory and systemic) were also observed throughout 7 days of illness in bivariate analyses. Differences in symptom severity were not observed between vaccinated and unvaccinated participants with A/H1N1 infection. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with A/H3N2 infection, receipt of seasonal influenza vaccine was associated with reduced symptom severity. Patient-centered discussion about the benefits of influenza vaccination should be expanded to include the possibility that the vaccine could attenuate symptoms.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences/Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2015
  • Citation: Deiss RG, Arnold JC, Chen WJ, Echols S, Fairchok MP, Schofield C, et.al., Vaccine-associated reduction in symptom severity among patients with influenza A/H3N2 disease. Vaccine. 2015 Dec 16;33(51):7160-7.

Postdischarge Cause-of-Death Analysis of Combat-Related Burn Patients.

Study

Abstract

Combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan have resulted in up to 8.8% of combat-related casualties suffering burns. From World War I through Desert Storm, burns have been associated with approximately 4% of the combat-related deaths. Experiencing a blast injury and exposure to killing and death while deployed has been shown to increase suicide risk. Although several studies of military populations have investigated risk factors for death among burn patients during the acute phase, no studies have reported mortality rates, cause-of-death, or the prevalence of suicide after hospital discharge. This study examined the case fatality rate, causes of death, and the prevalence of suicide among 830 combat burn patients discharged from the sole burn center in the U.S. Department of Defense, between March 7, 2003 and March 6, 2013. Cause-of-death was determined through the Armed Forces Medical Examiner's Office and the Office of the Secretary of Defense's National Death Index. A total of 11 deaths occurred among the 830 burn survivors, for an overall case fatality rate of 1.3%. Of the 11 who died, five deaths were related to accidental poisoning by exposure to drugs; three were related to operations of war (two after returning to the war zone), and the remaining three died from other accidental causes (one explosion and two vehicle crashes). There was no indication of suicide or suspicion of suicide as a cause-of-death for the former patients included in this study, suggesting that combat burn injury did not appear to increase the risk of death by suicide in our study population. Further research is needed to understand the factors that contribute to the apparent resilience of combat burn survivors.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2015
  • Citation: Escolas SM, Archuleta DJ, Orman JA, Chung KK, Renz EM. Postdischarge Cause-of-Death Analysis of Combat-Related Burn Patients. J Burn Care Res. 2015 Dec 1.
<< < ... 6 7 8 9 10  ... > >> 
Showing results 121 - 135 Page 9 of 15

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.