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Physical Fitness

Physical Fitness is the ability to physically accomplish all aspects of your tasks while avoiding injury and it’s inherently aligned to Department of Defense and individual Service medical standards and prerequisites for individual mission accomplishment and worldwide deployability. The goal is to be physically fit to so you can prevent injury or illness, and so you can have a speedy recovery if you are injured.

But, physical fitness is more than your body mass index, PT run time, or how many push-ups you can do. To optimize your physical fitness you need strength, flexibility, balance, and endurance all working together. For some, exercise is stress release, preventive health, social activity, or even spiritual expression.

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Training for a healthy heart can improve overall health

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2/22/2021
Military personnel wearing a mask exercising in the gym

Service members must be heart healthy to perform optimally throughout their military careers.

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Total Force Fitness Reintroduction

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2/17/2021
DHA Seal

The Military Health System is reintroducing Total Force Fitness. The Total Force Fitness concept focuses on a service member’s entire health throughout their career, connecting eight dimensions of fitness to optimize health, performance, and readiness holistically.

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COVID-19 presents challenges to heart health, physical fitness

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2/1/2021
Four military personnel, wearing masks, running on a track

Because of COVID-19 shutdowns, the overall health of both military personnel and beneficiaries has taken a hit over the last year.

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TFF: A holistic approach to health and performance

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1/29/2021
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Total Force Fitness encourages Service Members to look beyond traditional fitness approaches to boost their performance.

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Addressing emotional responses to threat of Coronavirus

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3/20/2020
U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Kathleen A. Myhre, 446th Airman and Family Readiness Center noncommissioned officer in charge, meditates outside the 446th Airlift Wing Headquarters building on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, Feb. 12, 2020. Myhre traveled to India in 2016 to study to become an internationally-certified yoga instructor. She now shares her holistic training with Reserve Citizen Airmen of the 446th AW. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Mary A. Andom)

Even if you’re feeling healthy, medical professionals recommend staying home and limiting social contact as much as possible

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The benefits of dog walking

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2/3/2020
Spending time with your dog is a great way to work on the eight pillars of Total Force Fitness. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, regular walking or playing with pets can decrease blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and triglyceride levels. Pets can also help manage loneliness and depression by providing companionship. (Courtesy photo)

Dog walking not only encourages people to get out of their homes and socialize, but pets also benefit

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Physical Fitness

Athletic trainers are enablers of Marine Corps readiness

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1/29/2020
Marine Corps Pfc. Barbara Pujolllopiz, (left), an administrative specialist with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, performs ammo can lifts while Capt. Katheryn Evazich, the MEU's adjutant, observes and counts repetitions during a Combat Fitness Test aboard Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The CFT is an annual Marine Corps physical training requirement in the which assesses combat readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Tawanya Norwood)

Athletic trainers are arriving at units throughout the Marine Corps to help keep Marines in the fight longer

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Update: Exertional Hyponatremia U.S. Armed Forces, 2001-2016

Infographic
4/4/2017
Exertional Hyponatremia occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is defined by a serum, plasma or blood sodium concentration below 135 millequivalents per liter. This infographic provides an update on Exertional Hyponatremia among U.S. Armed Forces, information on service members at high risk. Exertional hyponatremia can result from loss of sodium and/or potassium as well as relative excess of body water. There were 1,519 incident diagnoses of exertional hyponatremia among active component service members from 2001 through 2016. 86.8 percent were diagnosed and treated without having to be hospitalized. 2016 represented a decrease of 23.3 percent from 2015. In 2016, there were 85 incident diagnoses of exertional hyponatremia among active component service members and 77.6 percent of exertional hyponatremia cases affected males.  The annual rate was higher among females. Service members age 40 and over were most affected by exertional hyponatremia. High risk service members of exertional hyponatremia were: •	Females •	Service members aged 19 years or younger •	White, non-Hispanic and Asian/ Pacific Islander service members •	Recruit Trainees •	Marine Corps members Learn more at www.Health.mil/MSMR

Exertional Hyponatremia occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is defined by a serum, plasma or blood sodium concentration below 135 millequivalents per liter. This infographic provides an update on Exertional Hyponatremia among U.S. Armed Forces, information on service members at high risk. Exertional hyponatremia can result from loss of sodium and/or potassium as well as relative excess of body water.

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Update: Exertional Rhabdomyolysis Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2012 – 2016

Infographic
4/4/2017
Rhabdomyolysis is characterized by the rapid breakdown of overworked intracellular muscle, skeletal muscle cells and the release of toxic fibers into the bloodstream. It is a significant threat to U.S. military members during physical exertion, particularly under heat stress. This report summarizes numbers, rates, trends, risk factors and locations of occurrences for exertional heat injuries, including exertional rhabdomyolysis for 2012-2016. In 2016, there were 525 incident diagnoses of rhabdomyolysis between 2013 and 2016 rates increased 46.2 percent – 69.7 percent of cases occurred during May through September. Risk factors for exertional rhabdomyolysis include being male, younger than 20 years of age, black, non-Hispanic, low level of physical fitness, prior heat injury and exertion during warmer months. Additional information about the causes and prevention of exertional rhabdomyolysis can be found in the MSMR at www.Health.mil/MSMR

Rhabdomyolysis is characterized by the rapid breakdown of overworked intracellular muscle, skeletal muscle cells and the release of toxic fibers into the bloodstream. It is a significant threat to U.S. military members during physical exertion, particularly under heat stress. This report summarizes numbers, rates, trends, risk factors and locations of occurrences for exertional heat injuries, including exertional rhabdomyolysis for 2012-2016.

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What is Rhabdomyolysis?

Infographic
3/21/2017
Although regular exercise is good for the body, too much physical activity can do more harm than good. Rhabdomyolysis is the rapid breakdown of overworked muscle cells, following the release of toxic fibers into the bloodstream, causing many complications during physical exertion. This infographic provides information about the symptoms of Rhabdomyolysis, prevention and treatment.  How to avoid: •	Thoughtfully plan out your exercise routines •	Drink adequate amounts of fluid •	Minimize your workout time in extreme heat conditions How to treat: •	IV fluids/ fluid replacement •	Urinary Alkalization •	Blood transfusion  Symptoms of Rhabdomyolysis •	Difficulty in arm motion / trouble lifting objects •	Muscle weakness, muscle swelling and leg fatigue •	Fever, confusion, loss of consciousness •	Nausea and vomiting •	Dark colored urine or lack of urine  Learn more at Health.mil/MSMR

Rhabdomyolysis is the rapid breakdown of overworked muscle cells, following the release of toxic fibers into the bloodstream, causing many complications during physical exertion. This infographic provides information about the symptoms of Rhabdomyolysis, prevention and treatment.

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12 Days of Fitmas

Infographic
12/14/2016
infographic showing 12 exercises you can do from now until Christmas

Want to stay in shape over the holidays, but not sure where to start? Guard Your Health has you covered with its 12 Days of Fitmas challenge – a daily dose of quick exercises you can fit into your hectic schedule! #MerryFitmas

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Sunrise Yoga Class

Photo
9/29/2016
Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Paradiso participates in a sunrise yoga class on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt. If you’re thinking of adding exercise to your pain management plan, consider the following types: aerobic, strength, and flexibility. But make sure your exercise program is specifically tailored to your needs. Some exercises might be easier or more difficult to complete depending upon the type and location of your pain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chris Liaghat)

Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Paradiso participates in a sunrise yoga class on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt. If you’re thinking of adding exercise to your pain management plan, consider the following types: aerobic, strength, and flexibility. But make sure your exercise program is specifically tailored to your needs. Some exercises might be easier or more difficult to complete depending upon the type and location of your pain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chris Liaghat)

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Flag Football Game

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9/28/2016
Youth participate in a flag football game on Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Arizona. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Travis Gershaneck)

Youth participate in a flag football game on Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Arizona. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Travis Gershaneck)

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Vitamin D B12 Deficiency

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9/19/2016
Adequate intake of B vitamins is important to ensure optimum energy production and the building of muscle tissue.

Adequate intake of B vitamins is important to ensure optimum energy production and the building of muscle tissue.

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Practice Healthy Living Habits

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1/19/2016
Infographic listing 5 key healthy habits for the new year

A list of healthy living habits you can take on in 2016.

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