Back to Top Skip to main content

Year in Review: Innovations aid warfighters, families

Blue light produced by smartphones and computer monitors interferes with the brain’s production of melatonin, the hormone that makes people sleepy. The Navy’s Bureau of Medicine is working on lens tinting to block blue light and enhance the sleep of service members. MHS announced this innovation among many others in 2017. (U.S. Air Force photo by Greg L. Davis) Blue light produced by smartphones and computer monitors interferes with the brain’s production of melatonin, the hormone that makes people sleepy. The Navy’s Bureau of Medicine is working on lens tinting to block blue light and enhance the sleep of service members. MHS announced this innovation among many others in 2017. (U.S. Air Force photo by Greg L. Davis)

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Electronic Health Record | MHS GENESIS | Warrior Care | Medical Research and Development

Here’s a review of some innovations in 2017 that provided continued momentum for the Military Health System’s mission of a medically ready force and ready medical force:

Single electronic health record. MHS GENESIS is the first major upgrade to military health documentation in more than a decade. It launched in February and was deployed to four initial fielding sites in the Pacific Northwest by December: Fairchild Air Force Base, Naval Hospitals Oak Harbor and Bremerton, and Madigan Army Medical Center.

The agile and responsive system, designed to offer “seamless health care,” enables a single electronic health record for each of the 9.4 million DoD beneficiaries. MHS GENESIS will continue to roll out through 2022 to all military clinics and hospitals.

Beneficiaries are “the most important reason all of us are gathered here today,” Tom McCaffery, acting assistant secretary of Defense for health affairs, said during a launch celebration in mid-November. “This electronic health record will help us support and advance” health care.

Good night’s sleep. With sleep deprivation a significant and well-documented issue for service members, the Navy’s Bureau of Medicine is working on a tinted lens that can block blue light.

Blue light interferes with the brain’s production of melatonin, the hormone that makes people sleepy. Blue light comes from natural and artificial sources including computers, tablets, cellphones, and overhead lighting, said Navy Cmdr. Marc Herwitz, chief ancillary informatics officer for BUMED.

“Sleep is one of those hubs in the wheel of health,” said Diana Jeffery, a health psychologist and health care research analyst with the Defense Health Agency. “Without sleep, you impair mental health, cognitive functions, and decision-making skills. There are very few health functions that don’t require sleep.”

A preliminary study of the tinted lenses found that people who wore them two hours before bedtime fell asleep about 30 percent faster than those who didn’t.

More comfort and mobility. MHS and civilian researchers are collaborating on an advanced alternative to socket-based prosthetics. Osseointegration, a process that attaches the prosthesis directly to the skeleton, can improve comfort and mobility for qualified patients with amputations.

“Developing osseointegration as a capability within DoD makes good on our commitment to provide world-class solutions for combat casualties throughout the entire spectrum of care,” said Navy Cmdr. Jonathan A. Forsberg, an orthopedic oncologist at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, and an investigator at the Naval Medical Research Center.

An osseointegration clinical trial at Walter Reed is the first of its kind to be performed in the United States.

Best possible outcome.  With the goal of producing the best possible outcome for wounded warriors, senior leaders across MHS coordinated with the Joint Staff on DoD Instruction 6040.47. The instruction provides operational commanders, clinical providers, and medical planners with the best known combat medical techniques and procedures to minimize trauma-related disability and eliminate preventable deaths after injury. It also officially recognizes the Joint Trauma System as the DoD Center of Excellence for Trauma, and supports combatant commands establishing regional and individual combatant command trauma systems.

“For the first time in U.S. military history, we have the necessary policy to create and maintain a durable, enduring trauma system in times of war and peace,” said Dr. David Smith, now the reform leader for health care management for DoD.

You also may be interested in...

Osseointegration

Video
12/8/2017
Osseointegration

Doctors at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, are adapting technology developed in Europe called Osseointegration. The technology allows the attachment of prosthetics directly to a patient's skeleton.

Recommended Content:

Extremities Loss | Warrior Care

Decisions, decisions: Experts aim for higher quality, safer care in building electronic health record

Article
12/7/2017
Dr. Paul Cordts, director of the Defense Health Agency Office of the Functional Champion, speaks on a panel regarding the decision-making behind a large scale electronic health record while at the AMSUS Annual Meeting at the Gaylord Resort and Convention Center in Oxon Hill, Maryland, on November 29. (Courtesy photo)

Experts discuss ongoing progress, overall goals for MHS GENESIS

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Electronic Health Record | MHS GENESIS

Community, innovative collaborations are themes at third annual International Warrior Care Symposium

Article
12/6/2017
Air Commodore Rich Withnall, United Kingdom WC21 co-chair (left), Harjit Sajjan, Canada’s minister of national defence (center left), Dr. Dorothy Narvaez-Woods, special assistant to the assistant secretary of defense for health affairs (center right), and Mr. Bret Stevens, U.S. WC21 co-chair (right) pose for a photo following Minister Sajjan’s  keynote address. Senior representatives from 14 attending nations discussed their nations’ strategic priorities for warrior care. (Canadian Armed Forces photo by Corporal Lisa Fenton)

Community, innovative collaborations are themes at International Warrior Care Symposium

Recommended Content:

Warrior Care

Doctors use cutting-edge research at Navy hospital

Article
12/6/2017
Chad Rodarmer, traumatic brain injury clinic program manager, demonstrates tracking a patient's eye movement at Naval Medical Center San Diego, California. (DoD photo by EJ Hersom)

The Navy is developing and using cutting-edge research to better help service members, their family members and retirees

Recommended Content:

Technology | Warrior Care | Traumatic Brain Injury

From initial entry to retirement, access to seamless health care top priority among leaders

Article
12/6/2017
Dr. Paul Cordts, (right), director of the Defense Health Agency Office of the Functional Champion, and Dr. Ashwini Zenooz, chief medical officer for the VA’s Electronic Health Record Modernization executive office, speak at AMSUS Annual Meeting in Oxon Hill, Maryland, on November 29. This year’s conference theme emphasizes force health protection from the battlefield to home. (Courtesy photo)

DoD and Va are committed to working together

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Electronic Health Record | Electronic Health Record Modernization & Interoperability

Military health: All for one, one for all

Article
12/1/2017
From left, Retired Army Maj. Gen. Richard Thomas, president of Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences;  Navy Rear Adm. Colin Chinn, Joint Staff surgeon; Air Force Lt. Gen. Mark Ediger, Air Force surgeon general; Navy Vice Adm. Forrest Faison III, Navy surgeon general; Army Maj. Gen. Ronald Place, for the Army surgeon general; Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director of the Defense Health Agency; and Tom McCaffery, acting assistant secretary of defense for health affairs. (Courtesy photo)

Joint interoperability is theme of leadership session

Recommended Content:

MHS GENESIS | TRICARE Health Program

Acupuncture: Ancient technique complements modern medicine

Article
11/29/2017
Army Col. Dean Hommer (left), a visiting instructor from Brooke Army Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, observes as Navy nurse Lt. Rachael Wheelous (right) practices the battlefield acupuncture technique on Navy nurse Lt. Brent Pavell (center) during training at Naval Health Clinic Corpus Christi, Texas. (U.S. Navy photo by William Love)

Procedure has a role in easing pain, advocates say

Recommended Content:

Warrior Care | Pain Management

Care Loop

Video
11/29/2017
Care Loop

Air Force Tech. Sgt. Mariana Carrano’s business is patient care. She’s one of four Air Force liaison officers with the 86th Medical Squadron at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, a short drive from Ramstein AB. As an LO, as they are often called, Carrano is responsible for taking care of a patient throughout the entire care loop – from the moment he or she arrives at Ramstein AB until the moment he or she leaves.

Recommended Content:

Access to Health Care | Warrior Care

Service members share ‘art’ of healing

Article
11/28/2017
Air Force veteran Adrianna Ruark works on a drawing. (DoD photo by Roger L. Wollenberg)

Service members, veterans and caregivers shared how using art helps their recovery

Recommended Content:

Warrior Care

Active duty amputee

Video
11/28/2017
Active duty amputee

More than 1,500 service members have lost limbs in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2001. For those faced with this traumatic injury, the Department of Defense medical system has adapted in the last 20 years to speed up the recovery process and improve prosthetics.

Recommended Content:

Warrior Care | Physical Disability | Extremities Loss

Let's talk about sex, occupational therapist says

Article
11/22/2017
Occupational therapist Kathryn Ellis meets with a patient at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. (Courtesy photo)

Silence on topic no help to wounded warriors

Recommended Content:

Warrior Care

Brain injury sufferers find benefits in music therapy program

Article
11/17/2017
Army Staff Sgt. Sean Young, 2nd Battalion, 377th Parachute Field Artillery Regiment training room noncommissioned officer, strums the guitar during music therapy with Danielle Kalseth, 673rd Medical Operations Squadron creative arts and music therapist, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. Music therapy sessions help rehabilitate patients with traumatic brain injury. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Caitlin Russell)

For people with TBI, music therapy can be instrumental to rehabilitation

Recommended Content:

Warrior Care | Traumatic Brain Injury

MHS GENESIS deployed in Pacific Northwest

Article
11/16/2017
Commanding officers of the military treatment facilities involved in the initial deployment of MHS GENESIS, the Department of Defense's new electronic health record pose for a commemorative photo with senior leadership during the MHS GENESIS Recognition Ceremony Nov. 15 at Madigan Army Medical Center. The Pacific Northwest was selected as the initial deployment site for the new EHR, which has now been fielded at Fairchild Air Force Base, Naval Health Clinic Oak Harbor, Naval Hospital Bremerton and Madigan Army Medical Center. Pictured from left, Army Col. Michael Place, commander, Madigan Army Medical Center; Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director, Defense Health Agency; Air Force Col. Michaelle Guerrero, 92nd Medical Group at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington; Stacy Cummings, program executive officer, Defense Healthcare Management System; Navy Capt. Jeffrey Bitterman, commanding officer, Naval Hospital Bremerton; Navy Capt. Christine Sears, commanding officer, Naval Health Clinic Oak Harbor; and Thomas McCaffery, acting assistant secretary of defense for Health Affairs. (U.S. Army photo by Flavia Hulsey)

The Pacific Northwest was selected as the initial deployment site for the new EHR

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Electronic Health Record | MHS GENESIS

Things that make you go ‘om’: Meditation for healthy living

Article
11/15/2017
A soldier with the 160th Signal Brigade meditates before duty at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan.  (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Margaret Taylor)

Researchers say brain changes may lead to long-term benefits

Recommended Content:

Integrative Wellness | Consortium for Health and Military Performance | Warrior Care

MHS GENESIS Brochure

Publication
10/23/2017

This brochure includes high-level information about MHS GENESIS capabilities, the patient portal, and key benefits.

Recommended Content:

MHS GENESIS
<< < ... 6 7 8 9 10 > >> 
Showing results 76 - 90 Page 6 of 10

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.