Back to Top Skip to main content

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

Cervical cancer deaths have decreased by more than 50 percent due to regular screening tests that detect abnormalities before cancer develops. (MHS graphic) Cervical cancer deaths have decreased by more than 50 percent due to regular screening tests that detect abnormalities before cancer develops. (MHS graphic)

Recommended Content:

Women's Health

FORT LEONARD WOOD, Mo. — January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. Cervical cancer used to be one of the most common causes of cancer death for women in the United States. Thankfully, this rate has decreased over the past 30 years.

It's estimated that more than 12,000 new cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed this year and about 4,200 women will die from cervical cancer.

Cervical cancer deaths have decreased by more than 50 percent due to regular screening tests that detect abnormalities before cancer develops.

Regular Pap tests that screen for cervical cancer helps detect abnormal cells before they become cervical cancer.

HPV is one of the leading causes of cervical cancer. The majority of cervical cancer and pre-cancerous lesions are caused by two specific types of HPV; HPV-16 and HPV-18. These two types account for 70 percent of all cervical cancers.

The key to decreasing the number of deaths related to cervical cancer are prevention and early detection.

Well woman exams, Pap test and HPV testing are keys to detecting abnormal cells before they progress to cancer.

There is an HPV vaccine available to help prevent contracting HPV. The vaccine works best when given at age 11 or 12. Currently, routine vaccination for girls and boys should start at age 11 but can be given as early as age 9. The vaccination is given in three parts over a series of months and is recommended for all males age 13-21 and all females from age 13-26.

The best prevention is early detection and routine screenings with your primary care doctor should begin as early as possible. 

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

The HPV Vaccine Saves Lives

Infographic
5/16/2016
The Defense Department recommends male and female military service members, ages 17-26 years, receive an HPV vaccine series to generate a robust immune response to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4). This graphic highlights information the benefits of the HPV vaccine. The vaccine is most effective among fully vaccinated individuals.   Cancer Prevention Facts •	HPV is the most common sexually  transmitted infection (STI) •	There are more than 40 HPV types that can infect the genital areas •	Some HPV types give warts •	Some HPV types develop cancer  Effective Against STI Transmission •	The HPV vaccine is a safe and effective way to protect yourself from the virus •	The HPV vaccine provides nearly 100% protection from HPV types 6,11,16 and 18 •	HPV vaccine shows early signs of success in reducing HPV infections and related illnesses •	Protection is expected to be long-lasting  Safety Tips •	Getting your HPV vaccine and practicing safe sex such as wearing a condom may lower the risk of HPV •	Limiting the number of lifetime sex partners can also lower the risk of HPV •	When given the HPV vaccine, the body makes antibodies in response to the protection to clear it from the body  Get the Facts •	2,091 female service members aged 17-26 years received 1-3 HPV4 doses during 2006-2012, stratified by number of doses (1, 2, or 3).  Get the HPV Vaccine •	Only 22.5% of eligible service members initiated the series •	Of those, only 39.1% completed the full three-dose series as of June 2011.  Even though the 3 dose regiment provides nearly complete protection against HPV16 and HPV18, in the U.S., only 12% and 19% of female adolescents among commercial and Medicaid plans respectively complete the series.  Read HPV Facts from the CDC: https://www.ok.gov/health2/documents/IMM_Teens_HPV_Facts.pdf  Read the STI issue of the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report at Health.Mil/MSMR   Get the conversation started. Ask your healthcare provider about the HPV vaccine today. Follow us on Twitter @AFHSBPAGE and use hashtag #VaccinesWork.

The Defense Department recommends male and female military service members, ages 17-26 years, receive an HPV vaccine series to generate a robust immune response to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4).

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Immunizations | Men's Health | Human Papillomavirus | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Women's Health

Breast Cancer

Infographic
5/9/2016
infographic about the breast cancer and how to protect against it.

In the U.S., with the exception of skin cancer, breast cancer accounts for the greatest number of cancer diagnoses in women and the second most common cause of female cancer-related deaths. This infographic shows seven ways to protect yourself from breast cancer.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Women's Health

Smallpox Vaccine in Pregnancy

Publication
2/26/2016

The National Smallpox Vaccine in Pregnancy Registry was created to follow the pregnancy outcomes of women who were exposed to the smallpox vaccine during pregnancy.

Recommended Content:

Smallpox | Women's Health

Cervical Health Awareness Month

Infographic
1/11/2016
Infographic about Cervical Health Awareness month

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month

Recommended Content:

Women's Health | Preventive Health
<< < 1 2 3 4 > >> 
Showing results 46 - 49 Page 4 of 4

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.