Back to Top Skip to main content

Rocky and Elmo want providers to "Watch. Ask. Share."

Defense Health Agency Director Vice Admiral Raquel “Rocky” Bono joined Sesame Street’s Elmo to record a welcome video for the new provider section of the Sesame Street for Military Families website. (Photo by MHS Communications) Defense Health Agency Director Vice Admiral Raquel “Rocky” Bono joined Sesame Street’s Elmo to record a welcome video for the new provider section of the Sesame Street for Military Families website. (Photo by MHS Communications)

Recommended Content:

Mental Health Care | Public Health | Preventive Health | Children's Health | Deployment Health

Health care providers now have exciting new resources to help them work with patients from military families, thanks to research-based content on the Sesame Street for Military Families website. In a video on the new provider section, Vice Adm. Raquel Bono welcomes health care providers to the website while standing beside Sesame Street’s Elmo.  Bono, director of the Defense Health Agency, introduces herself as “Rocky” and says she is a military leader, surgeon, and parent.   

“We are thrilled to share with you what Sesame Street has developed from over 10 years of research with military families,” said Bono. “This section of Sesame Street for Military Families helps providers like you engage with the families you serve.”

Topics are broken into three steps Bono and Elmo call, “Watch. Ask. Share.” The idea is for providers to watch the short videos and use what they learn to ask military patients about relevant issues in their lives. They can share the website and downloadable kid-friendly handouts with their patients.

“Although my children are grown now,” Bono said, “I would have loved resources like this back when I deployed, or when we were going through the countless moves and other life events that are a part of military life.”

Many resources on the website guide parents in general, according to Kelly Blasko, psychologist and program lead at DHA. Blasko said the provider section is organized with a cultural component, examples of questions for use by providers, and includes “parenting tips known to be helpful to military families.”

Blasko worked with Sesame Street to identify resources and surveyed over 100 providers about the kind of information they would find useful. Short videos feature military parents and spouses discussing their deployments, homecomings, and relocations.

“What's really nice about Sesame Street is they are experts at child education, child development, and media,” said Blasko, who added that when parents and children watch videos together and discuss them afterward, it becomes a collaborative experience.

According to Blasko, offering resources and information about military culture is exactly what surveyed providers wanted so they could help military parents and children build resilience for good health and well-being.

“We know military family life involves many transitions, large and small,” said Blasko. “And change can be stressful for everyone. We found health care providers are willing to watch the short videos and like these resources.”

Printable handouts with Sesame Street characters double as tips for families and coloring pages for children. All materials are available in English and Spanish. A free shortcut app to the Sesame Street for Military Families website is available for Android and iOS devices from iTunes, Google Play, and Amazon for Kindle Fire.

“Having providers share these resources with parents can help them with difficult conversations, and in turn, can improve the overall family functioning,” Blasko said. “When parents are more confident in their parenting, it really influences their health positively and is reflected in their child. Well-being is interconnected.”


You also may be interested in...

There is hope

Article
7/11/2018
Medically assisted treatment for opioid use can break the cycle of addiction.

More than 350,000 deaths are attributed to opioid overdoses nationwide since 1999

Recommended Content:

Mental Health Care | Substance Abuse | Addiction | Mental Wellness

Environmental health works behind the scenes to keep Soldiers ready

Article
7/8/2018
Army Spc. Johnathan Vargas from Environmental Health at Kenner Army Health Clinic conducts a water test using a LaMontte water quality kit at the Fort Lee dining facility while conducting an inspection recently. (U.S. Army photo by Lesley Atkinson)

On the team are a mix of military and civilian employees who conduct inspections, food safety training, water sampling and entomology services

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health

USAISR burn flight team deploys to Guatemala

Article
7/5/2018
Army Capt. Argelia Felix-Camacho, a critical care nurse at the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research Burn Center and member of the USAISR Burn Center Burn Flight Team comforts a patient in Guatemala before a flight to the Shriner's Hospital for Children in Galveston, Texas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Corenthia Fennell)

The patients -- all children needing specialized treatment -- and the teamwork between the Army and Air Force ensured the patients' safe transport from Guatemala to the U.S.

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Civil Military Medicine | Civil Support | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief

Sports drinks: What are you really putting in your body?

Article
6/27/2018
Generally our bodies are comprised of approximately 60 to 70 percent water. We need water for digestion, energy and oxygen transport, and temperature regulation. Senior Airman Johanna Magner, 22nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, drinks water on the flightline in front of a KC-135 Stratotanker. With rising temperatures during the summer months people are encouraged to drink more water to stay hydrated. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jenna K. Caldwell)

In general, sports drinks are typically a calculated blend of carbohydrates, electrolytes and water

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Summer Safety

Five tips to improve men's health

Article
6/12/2018
Take Command of your health

Taking preventive steps and making changes to your lifestyle can improve your health

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Men's Health

Breaking down anxiety one fear at a time

Article
6/5/2018
Marine Staff Sgt. Andrew Gales participates in ‘battlefield’ acupuncture, also known as ‘ear acupuncture,’ at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, as a treatment for anxiety related to PTSD. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kevin Cunningham)

Generalized anxiety, panic disorder, and anxiety related to PTSD are common disorders. In fact, an estimated 31 percent of U.S. adults experience anxiety at some point in their lives; one marine discusses his journey.

Recommended Content:

Mental Health Care | Preventive Health | Men's Health | Mental Wellness | Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Assess your mental wellness during Mental Health Awareness Month

Article
5/25/2018
Similar to physical health, mental health requires regular care. Mental health is as critical as physical health to mission readiness. Therefore, it’s just as important to invest in your mental health as it is your physical health. (U.S. Air Force photo)

TRICARE provides mental health services for you and your family at all times

Recommended Content:

Mental Health Care | Mental Wellness | Men's Health | TRICARE Health Program

TRICARE Mental Health

Video
5/24/2018
TRICARE Mental Health

Watch this video to learn more about the mental health care benefits TRICARE provides

Recommended Content:

Mental Health Care

Breaking down the image: Mental health

Article
5/22/2018
Kevin Hines, a suicide survivor and activist for suicide prevention, speaks to Airmen assigned to the 28th Bomb Wing about his story at Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota. Hines is one of 36 people to survive a suicide attempt by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, California. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Nicolas Z. Erwin)

May has been National Mental Health Month since 1949

Recommended Content:

Mental Health Care | Health Readiness | Mental Wellness

Servicemembers demonstrate grace under fire

Article
5/21/2018
The 99th Medical Group, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada receives the 2018 Heroes of Military Medicine Ambassador Award in Washington, D.C., May 3, 2018, for the life-saving efforts of three of its airmen during the tragic Las Vegas shooting on Oct. 1, 2017. Army Maj. Gen. (retired) Joseph Caravalho (right), president, Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine presented the award to the 99th MG. (MHS photo)

Five honorees celebrated at the 2018 Heroes of Military Medicine Awards Ceremony, including the Airmen for their heroic life-saving efforts during the tragic Las Vegas shooting on Oct. 1, 2017.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health

Years in the making: How the risk for Alzheimer’s disease can be reduced

Article
5/18/2018
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 5.5 million Americans, up to 1.7 percent of the population, may have Alzheimer’s disease. Symptoms such as memory problems, impaired reasoning or judgment, vision or spatial issues, and difficulty finding words can indicate early stages of the disease. (U.S. Army graphic)

About 3 million new cases of Alzheimer’s Disease, the most common form of dementia, are diagnosed every year. Experts say lifestyle modifications can help prevent this disease.

Recommended Content:

Mental Health Care | Mental Wellness

Making behavioral health care easy

Article
5/11/2018
Army Staff Sgt. Michael McMillan (right), 35th Infantry Division behavioral health noncommissioned officer in charge, confers with Army Capt. Trever Patton, 35th ID psychologist, in Kuwait. Embedded behavioral health teams are a key part of providing easy access to care for service members. (Army photo by Staff Sgt. Tina Villalobos)

Embedded behavioral health teams let service members easily access behavioral health care right in their unit areas

Recommended Content:

Mental Health Care | Mental Wellness

New simulator preps WBAMC staff for OB emergencies

Article
5/1/2018
Regina Vadney, nurse midwife, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, evaluates a medical manikin using WBAMC's new simulation system which provides cutting-edge training to medical staff during a simulated postpartum hemorrhage scenario. The new simulation system aims to increase communication, and improve interdisciplinary and clinical performance of staff when treating obstetric emergencies. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

The state-of-the-art simulator provides medical staff up to various cutting-edge training scenarios

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Women's Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Ear infections common problem among children – and it’s not one to ignore

Article
4/27/2018
Air Force Capt. Michael Guindon, 374th Medical Group pediatrician, examines a young patient’s ear at Yokota Air Base, Japan. Odds are, your child will suffer an ear infection by age three. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Delano Scott)

An ear infection is one of the most common reasons children visit a doctor

Recommended Content:

Children's Health

Getting tested for STIs is an 'important part of sexual health'

Article
4/26/2018
Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Robert Hall studies a blood sample with a microscope at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay’s laboratory. Blood tests and pap smears are commonly used ways to diagnose sexually transmitted infections. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel)

Chlamydia and gonorrhea are two of the most common sexually transmitted infections in the United States. Taking preventive steps, like getting tested and practicing safe sex, can help reduce risk of infection or spreading the infection to others.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Men's Health | Women's Health
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 34

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.