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New DoD educational podcast series promotes better health

The Defense Health Agency’s instructional podcasts highlight health technology and offer tips, tools and techniques to help improve the lives of those in the military community. The Defense Health Agency’s instructional podcasts highlight health technology and offer tips, tools and techniques to help improve the lives of those in the military community.

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Service members, veterans and their families can tune in to three new podcast series to hear the latest on how health technology can improve their lives. The Defense Health Agency’s instructional podcasts highlight health technology and offer tips, tools and techniques to help improve the lives of those in the military community.

Produced by Department of Defense experts in military health care and technology, the Defense Health Agency’s three new shows are: “Next Generation Behavioral Health,” “Military Meditation Coach” and “A Better Night’s Sleep.”

“Our mission is to coach military health care teams, veterans, service members and families about how to use innovative mobile health technology in treatment or on your own,” says Dr. Julie Kinn, research psychologist at the Defense Health Agency. “Our podcasts inform, while also being practical and entertaining.”

The “Military Meditation Coach” podcast series features meditation, mindfulness and relaxation exercises. The goal is to help listeners learn how to be mentally fit, build resiliency and manage stress through a wide variety of exercises lead by clinicians at the Naval Medical Center San Diego and the Naval Center for Combat and Operational Stress Control. Each episode is designed for listeners to tune in on their own, in a group or with a health care provider.  

 “A Better Night’s Sleep” offers listeners tips and information on sleep disorders, evidence-based treatments, nightmares and the importance of adequate rest. Kinn and Dr. Jonathan Olin, medical director of Evans Army Community Hospital’s Sleep Lab at Fort Carson in Colorado, host the podcast, along with other sleep experts in the Military Health System. In each episode, Kinn and Olin answer audience questions, explain how treatments work and interview other sleep specialists — to improve sleep for both military and civilian listeners.

The “Next Generation Behavioral Health” podcast offers 10-minute tips for clinicians using health technology in clinical care, such as how to prescribe mobile apps to their patients, as well as how to tell which apps are safe, effective and evidence-based. The podcast also takes an in-depth look at why mobile health is important and answers the most common questions that health care professionals have when integrating technology into practice. Kinn and fellow Defense Health Agency psychologist Dr. Christina Armstrong host the show.

Upcoming episodes will feature interviews with behavioral health experts on the latest mobile health research, integrating apps into treatment and protecting patient information.

“Integrating technology into care doesn’t change the way you’re practicing,” Armstrong says. “The most important part of this new addition of a mobile app is that you’re taking that evidence-based treatment and now you’re doing it in a more efficient way. And you’re also able to collect accurate data in real time.”

Although the new podcasts were created with the military community in mind, anyone can subscribe for free wherever podcasts are available. Learn more about “Next Generation Behavioral Health,” “Military Meditation Coach” and “A Better Night’s Sleep,” at the Defense Health Agency's Connected Health site.


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