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RESET improves pediatric care

Air Force Capt. Joseph Migliuri, 92nd Medical Group pediatrician, performs a wellness vision exam during a patient’s check-up at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The pediatric team has implemented a new concept of operations: rewarding, efficiency, setting priorities and empowering team members, or RESET, to their system of patient care. The integration of RESET in the Military Health System Genesis workflow has improved the clinic’s goals of patient access and care. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Whitney Laine) Air Force Capt. Joseph Migliuri, 92nd Medical Group pediatrician, performs a wellness vision exam during a patient’s check-up at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The pediatric team has implemented a new concept of operations: rewarding, efficiency, setting priorities and empowering team members, or RESET, to their system of patient care. The integration of RESET in the Military Health System Genesis workflow has improved the clinic’s goals of patient access and care. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Whitney Laine)

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FAIRCHILD AIR FORCE BASE, Wash. — The 92nd Medical Group Pediatric Clinic implemented a new concept of operations: rewarding, efficiency, setting priorities and empowering team members, or RESET, to their system of patient care. 

RESET came from an original model built at Ramstein Air Base and was modified by Fairchild Airmen to better suit the pediatric clinic and successfully integrate with Military Health System (MHS) Genesis.

“The aim of RESET is to improve access to care for the patient population,” said Air Force Capt. Joseph Migliuri, 92nd MDG pediatrician. “This has allowed patients to see their provider more expeditiously. This is done by changing the way in which we do business, cutting waste in our workflow and rewarding teams that are effective in this area.”

Although the RESET system was not intended to be used with MHS Genesis or a pediatric clinic, the pediatric team restructured the original blueprint to fit the needs of the clinic. With the new design, the team focused on their main goal of increasing patient access.

“Records show us that in December 2017, we had a rate of zero available appointments within a week’s time; since integrating the RESET system, we saw our rates of availability increase to 55 appointments per week as of March 2018,” said Air Force Capt. Neal Alexander, 92nd MDG maternal child flight nurse manager.

Virtual appointments are offered to allow patients to receive the care they need from doctors without having to visit the clinic. Caring for patients through virtual appointments has also allowed doctors to have more time to see more patients per day.

“Patients would previously have to go through a long rope of people to have their information forwarded to a nurse or technician and then a doctor,” Alexander said. “We have changed the appointment process. Now, when a patient calls, they are offered a virtual consultation or a face-to-face consultation.”

The team has changed the culture of their work environment with the reward portion of the RESET program. This has motivated team members to become innovative, driven and efficient with patient care.

Within three months implementing RESET into the 92nd MDG Pediatric Clinic MHS Genesis workflow, the clinic’s goals of patient access and care have greatly improved. Through the spread of this innovation and modernization to other specialties and Department of Defense installations, Team Fairchild’s Airmen are keeping mobility forces operationally ready for any missions they’re called to do.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

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