Back to Top Skip to main content

Army Medicine joins forces with civilian hospitals to sustain medical readiness

Army Brig. Gen. Telita Crosland, RHC-Atlantic Commanding General, signs letter of commitment Jan. 18 recognizing the partnership between Army Medicine and Cooper University Health Care to provide advanced surgical trauma training allowing Army medical professionals to sustain their trauma skills by working alongside civilian counterparts at high-volume Level 1 trauma centers. Cooper joins the Oregon Health & Science University as one of the two trauma centers partnering with Army Medicine. (Courtesy photo by Cooper University Health Care ) Army Brig. Gen. Telita Crosland, RHC-Atlantic Commanding General, signs letter of commitment Jan. 18 recognizing the partnership between Army Medicine and Cooper University Health Care to provide advanced surgical trauma training allowing Army medical professionals to sustain their trauma skills by working alongside civilian counterparts at high-volume Level 1 trauma centers. Cooper joins the Oregon Health & Science University as one of the two trauma centers partnering with Army Medicine. (Courtesy photo by Cooper University Health Care )

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Civil Military Medicine

A group of 10 Army medical professionals are the first to participate in a new program designed to help them sustain battlefield medicine skills. But the doctors and nurses are training far from combat support hospitals in austere locations, instead they are honing their skills in two of the nation's civilian teaching hospitals.

The program, called Army Military-Civilian Trauma Team Training (AMCT3), is a two-to-three year program at Cooper University Health Care in Camden, New Jersey, and Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland, Oregon. The goal of the program is to advance military trauma operational readiness for deployment around the globe by partnering with high-volume civilian trauma centers to gain critical teamwork and technical trauma skills.

"We are good at trauma care but remain relentless in our pursuit of zero preventable battlefield casualties," said Army Brig. Gen. Telita Crosland, commanding general, Regional Health Command-Atlantic, who recently signed letters of commitment on behalf of the Army Surgeon General symbolizing the partnership. "Partnerships with leading trauma centers like Cooper and OHSU allows Army Medicine to leverage a national and global network of support that brings us closer to our goal," added Crosland.

The program gives Army surgical teams and individual Soldiers the opportunity to maintain proficiency and sustain their trauma skills by working alongside civilian counter parts at high-volume Level 1 trauma centers, according to Crosland. Level 1 trauma centers are comprehensive regional facilities capable of providing total care for every aspect of injury.

"This is another first for Cooper, and we are honored and proud to train this elite Army medical team," said George E. Norcross III, Chairman of Cooper's Board of Trustees. "As a high-volume, academic tertiary care Level I Trauma Center, our experience and reputation uniquely positions us to provide the hands-on training and skills this elite team needs to help them save lives on battlefields around the world."

The AMCT3 program addresses the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 directive for the Military Health System to establish partnerships to maintain trauma care competency along with developing standardized combat care instruction to enhance quality of care outcomes for trauma care.

"Our military medical treatment facilities lack the case acuity, case volume and case diversity that we need to sustain operational readiness," said John Ramiccio, Program Manager, Civilian Partnerships and Programming, G-3/7 Readiness & Training Division, Army Medical Command. "That is why Congress got involved and mandated it in the NDAA because this has been identified as contributive to addressing battlefield outcomes," added Ramiccio.

The program is also inspired by national efforts to stop preventable deaths in people with traumatic injuries. Research has shown that deaths and disabilities due to trauma can be prevented with better training, coordination and streamlined trauma care systems. AMCT3 promotes a two-way exchange of ideas and can help both military and civilian trauma centers improve outcomes for their patients.

"OHSU is proud to partner with the Army in enabling health care professionals to provide advanced trauma care and experience it from new perspectives," said John Hunter, M.D., OHSU executive vice president and chief executive officer of OHSU Healthcare. "We collaborate because we know it will benefit our patients and help us meet our mission to improve the health and well-being of Oregonians and beyond."

The Soldiers assigned to the program were selected because they have medical specialties typically used in military forward surgical teams, such as emergency medicine physician, trauma surgeon, nurse anesthetist, and intensive care and emergency care nurses.

Beyond their medical specialties, Army Col. Jason Seery, the AMCT3 task force chairman and the Army's senior participant at Cooper University, said the Army looked for Soldiers who could work well with our civilian partners. "They are pathfinders and helping to establish this program for the Soldiers and partner hospitals to follow," said Seery. "We looked for officers who are collaborative, understand the goals of this effort and have a deeper understanding of what trauma team training is about."

One of those officers is Army Capt. Simon Sarkisian, a Forward Surgical Team emergency physician. "I received great training with the military in my emergency medical residency. Here [at Cooper] I'll get to continue that and really get to do trauma, try to excel at trauma and be a trauma expert for the betterment of our Soldiers overseas when we get deployed."

Both Ramiccio and Seery see this strategic partnership as transformational in changing the culture of military medicine from competition to collaboration. "The program is one of the most significant things Army Medicine has done with individual and team readiness in decades," said Seery.

Over the next few years the Army Medical Command hopes to establish at least 10 trauma team training partnerships across the country.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Tick Facts: Dangers at the height of tick season

Article
7/31/2019
A tick like this one, seen at 10x magnification, can spread a number of dangerous pathogens during the warm-weather months. (Photo by Cornel Constantin)

Many diseases are transferred to humans by ticks — Lyme is the most common, but several others, described here, are worth knowing about

Recommended Content:

Bug-Borne Illnesses | Bug Week: July 27 - August 2 | Tick-Borne Illnesses | Health Readiness | Preventive Health | Public Health

U.S., Royal Air Force Aeromedical Evacuation Squadrons train together

Article
7/26/2019
Reserve Citizen Airmen from Joint Base Charleston's 315th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron prepare a mock patient during a drill inside a C-17 Globemaster III, July 10, 2019. Drills performed while in-flight are to mimic real-life scenarios that the 315 AES may encounter. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman William Brugge)

The C-17 Globemaster III serves as a common platform for medevacs in both squadrons

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability

Mononucleosis

Infographic
7/1/2019
Mononucleosis

A specimen is tested for mononucleosis at the medical clinic on Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota (U.S. Air Force photo)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Influenza

Infographic
7/1/2019
Adminstration of a seasonal flu vaccination. (U.S. Navy photo)

Adminstration of a seasonal flu vaccination. (U.S. Navy photo)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Zika

Infographic
7/1/2019
Zika

Anopheles merus mosquito. (CDC photo by James Gathany)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Psittacosis

Infographic
7/1/2019
Psittacosis

Green-winged Macaw. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

MSMR Vol. 26 No. 7 - July 2019

Report
7/1/2019

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Modeling Lyme disease host animal habitat suitability, West Point, New York; Incidence, timing, and seasonal patterns of heat illnesses during U.S. Army basic combat training, 2014–2018; Update: Heat illness, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018; Update: Exertional rhabdomyolysis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2014–2018; Update: Exertional hyponatremia, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2003–2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

Sexually transmitted infections on the rise in military

Article
6/26/2019
Some sexually transmitted infections are on the rise in the military. To increase awareness, members of Team McConnell attend a briefing on STIs at McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Myrick)

What you need to know to stay safe

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Men's Health | Women's Health

Vice President Pence tours USNS Comfort before its Latin America deployment

Article
6/20/2019
Vice President Mike Pence (right) greets Navy Lt. Gwendolyn Mann, and his wife, Karen Pence (center right), greets Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Edna Wallace during a tour of the USNS Comfort in Miami, June 18, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Jordan R. Bair)

The vice president called the deployment a lifesaving mission

Recommended Content:

Civil Military Medicine | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief | Global Health Engagement | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Innovative Readiness Training ensures readiness of military reserve personnel

Article
6/17/2019
Missions such the IRT offer extensive hands-on experience within a vast array of service opportunities. For the DAEOC Tri-State IRT 2019, medical personnel are broadening their expertise by providing a no-cost health clinic, including vision care, to the surrounding communities of Sikeston, Missouri, Barlow, Kentucky and Cairo, Illinois. (DoD photo)

As a joint service operation, the IRT strengthens bonds between service members from different branches

Recommended Content:

Civil Military Medicine

German allies visit JBSA-Fort Sam Houston on 75th anniversary of D-Day

Article
6/14/2019
Maj. Gen. Gesine Kruger, Commander for the German Bundeswehr Medical Academy (pictured center in the Flight Paramedic Training Simulator) and her delegation observed training and toured the Critical Care Flight Paramedic Course at the Health Readiness Center of Excellence. (U.S. Army photo)

The purpose of this visit was to further strengthen the bonds and interoperability programs between our allied countries or partner nations

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Health Readiness

Cyclosporiasis

Infographic
6/1/2019
Cyclosporiasis

Outbreak of Cyclosporiasis in a U.S. Air Force Training Population, Joint Base San Antonio–Lackland, TX, 2018 While bacteria and viruses are the usual causes of gastrointestinal disease outbreaks, 2 Joint Base San Antonio (JBSA)– Lackland, TX, training populations experienced an outbreak of diarrheal illness caused by the parasite Cyclospora cayetanensis in June and July 2018. Cases were identified from outpatient medical records and responses to patient questionnaires.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Norovirus

Infographic
6/1/2019
Norovirus

Norovirus Outbreak in Army Service Members, Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, May 2018 In May 2018, an outbreak of gastrointestinal illnesses due to norovirus occurred at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait. The outbreak lasted 14 days, and a total of 91 cases, of which 8 were laboratory confirmed and 83 were suspected, were identified.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Female infertility

Infographic
6/1/2019
Female infertility

Female infertility, active component service women, U.S. Armed Forces, 2013–2018 This report presents the incidence and prevalence of diagnosed female infertility among active component service women. During 2013–2018, 8,744 active component women of childbearing potential were diagnosed with infertility for the first time, resulting in an overall incidence of 79.3 cases per 10,000 person-years (p-yrs).

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

MSMR Vol. 26 No. 6 - June 2019

Report
6/1/2019

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Modeling Lyme disease host animal habitat suitability, West Point, New York; Incidence, timing, and seasonal patterns of heat illnesses during U.S. Army basic combat training, 2014–2018; Update: Heat illness, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018; Update: Exertional rhabdomyolysis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2014–2018; Update: Exertional hyponatremia, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2003–2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 40

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.