Back to Top Skip to main content

Army Medicine joins forces with civilian hospitals to sustain medical readiness

Army Brig. Gen. Telita Crosland, RHC-Atlantic Commanding General, signs letter of commitment Jan. 18 recognizing the partnership between Army Medicine and Cooper University Health Care to provide advanced surgical trauma training allowing Army medical professionals to sustain their trauma skills by working alongside civilian counterparts at high-volume Level 1 trauma centers. Cooper joins the Oregon Health & Science University as one of the two trauma centers partnering with Army Medicine. (Courtesy photo by Cooper University Health Care ) Army Brig. Gen. Telita Crosland, RHC-Atlantic Commanding General, signs letter of commitment Jan. 18 recognizing the partnership between Army Medicine and Cooper University Health Care to provide advanced surgical trauma training allowing Army medical professionals to sustain their trauma skills by working alongside civilian counterparts at high-volume Level 1 trauma centers. Cooper joins the Oregon Health & Science University as one of the two trauma centers partnering with Army Medicine. (Courtesy photo by Cooper University Health Care )

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Civil Military Medicine

A group of 10 Army medical professionals are the first to participate in a new program designed to help them sustain battlefield medicine skills. But the doctors and nurses are training far from combat support hospitals in austere locations, instead they are honing their skills in two of the nation's civilian teaching hospitals.

The program, called Army Military-Civilian Trauma Team Training (AMCT3), is a two-to-three year program at Cooper University Health Care in Camden, New Jersey, and Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland, Oregon. The goal of the program is to advance military trauma operational readiness for deployment around the globe by partnering with high-volume civilian trauma centers to gain critical teamwork and technical trauma skills.

"We are good at trauma care but remain relentless in our pursuit of zero preventable battlefield casualties," said Army Brig. Gen. Telita Crosland, commanding general, Regional Health Command-Atlantic, who recently signed letters of commitment on behalf of the Army Surgeon General symbolizing the partnership. "Partnerships with leading trauma centers like Cooper and OHSU allows Army Medicine to leverage a national and global network of support that brings us closer to our goal," added Crosland.

The program gives Army surgical teams and individual Soldiers the opportunity to maintain proficiency and sustain their trauma skills by working alongside civilian counter parts at high-volume Level 1 trauma centers, according to Crosland. Level 1 trauma centers are comprehensive regional facilities capable of providing total care for every aspect of injury.

"This is another first for Cooper, and we are honored and proud to train this elite Army medical team," said George E. Norcross III, Chairman of Cooper's Board of Trustees. "As a high-volume, academic tertiary care Level I Trauma Center, our experience and reputation uniquely positions us to provide the hands-on training and skills this elite team needs to help them save lives on battlefields around the world."

The AMCT3 program addresses the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 directive for the Military Health System to establish partnerships to maintain trauma care competency along with developing standardized combat care instruction to enhance quality of care outcomes for trauma care.

"Our military medical treatment facilities lack the case acuity, case volume and case diversity that we need to sustain operational readiness," said John Ramiccio, Program Manager, Civilian Partnerships and Programming, G-3/7 Readiness & Training Division, Army Medical Command. "That is why Congress got involved and mandated it in the NDAA because this has been identified as contributive to addressing battlefield outcomes," added Ramiccio.

The program is also inspired by national efforts to stop preventable deaths in people with traumatic injuries. Research has shown that deaths and disabilities due to trauma can be prevented with better training, coordination and streamlined trauma care systems. AMCT3 promotes a two-way exchange of ideas and can help both military and civilian trauma centers improve outcomes for their patients.

"OHSU is proud to partner with the Army in enabling health care professionals to provide advanced trauma care and experience it from new perspectives," said John Hunter, M.D., OHSU executive vice president and chief executive officer of OHSU Healthcare. "We collaborate because we know it will benefit our patients and help us meet our mission to improve the health and well-being of Oregonians and beyond."

The Soldiers assigned to the program were selected because they have medical specialties typically used in military forward surgical teams, such as emergency medicine physician, trauma surgeon, nurse anesthetist, and intensive care and emergency care nurses.

Beyond their medical specialties, Army Col. Jason Seery, the AMCT3 task force chairman and the Army's senior participant at Cooper University, said the Army looked for Soldiers who could work well with our civilian partners. "They are pathfinders and helping to establish this program for the Soldiers and partner hospitals to follow," said Seery. "We looked for officers who are collaborative, understand the goals of this effort and have a deeper understanding of what trauma team training is about."

One of those officers is Army Capt. Simon Sarkisian, a Forward Surgical Team emergency physician. "I received great training with the military in my emergency medical residency. Here [at Cooper] I'll get to continue that and really get to do trauma, try to excel at trauma and be a trauma expert for the betterment of our Soldiers overseas when we get deployed."

Both Ramiccio and Seery see this strategic partnership as transformational in changing the culture of military medicine from competition to collaboration. "The program is one of the most significant things Army Medicine has done with individual and team readiness in decades," said Seery.

Over the next few years the Army Medical Command hopes to establish at least 10 trauma team training partnerships across the country.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Global Influenza Summary: March 25, 2018

Report
3/25/2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | AFHSB Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

Global Influenza Summary: March 18, 2018

Report
3/18/2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | AFHSB Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

Global Influenza Summary: March 11, 2018

Report
3/11/2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | AFHSB Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

USNS Mercy deploys in support of Pacific Partnership 2018

Article
3/1/2018
The hospital ship USNS Mercy departs Naval Base San Diego in support of Pacific Partnership 2018, Feb. 23, 2018. Pacific Partnership, now in its 13th iteration, is the largest annual multinational humanitarian assistance and disaster relief preparedness mission conducted in the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Kelsey Adams)

Medical, dental, civil engineering and veterinary teams will partner with each host nation

Recommended Content:

Civil Military Medicine | Civil Support | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief | Veterinary Service

Pediatric care in the military rated 'excellent' but can improve

Article
2/27/2018
Experts say pediatric care within the Military Health System is excellent as they strive to improve and provide top-quality care for military children. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel)

Experts say pediatric care within the Military Health System is excellent as they strive to improve and provide top-quality care for military children

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Health Readiness | Preventive Health | Military Health System Review Report

Air Force medic administers life-saving aid after car crash

Article
2/21/2018
Air Force Staff Sgt. Geoffrey Rigby, 56th Medical Operations Squadron physical therapy technician, poses in front of emergency medical equipment. Rigby helped to save a life using his medical knowledge and training in Glendale, Arizona. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexander Cook)

Despite potentially saving a man’s life, Rigby remains humble about the experience

Recommended Content:

Civil Military Medicine

Focus on prevention … not the cure for heart disease

Article
2/21/2018
Navy Lt. Cmdr. Cecily Dye is chief cardiologist at Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nicholas N. Lopez)

Many heart health problems can be avoided

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Heart Health | Preventive Health

‘Kissing disease’ exhausting, but it strikes only once

Article
2/15/2018
Mononucleosis is nicknamed the “kissing disease” because it’s spread through saliva. U.S. Navy Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Michael Zegarra shares the traditional first kiss with his wife Caterina Zegarra, after the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz pulled into port at Naval Base Kitsap, Washington, Dec. 10, 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Greg Hall)

Mononucleosis: Learn how virus spreads, who’s most vulnerable

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Preventive Health | Public Health

Surveillance for Vector-Borne Diseases, Active and Reserve Component Service Members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2010 – 2016

Infographic
2/14/2018
Within the U.S. Armed Forces considerable effort has been applied to the prevention and treatment of vector-borne diseases. A key component of that effort has been the surveillance of vector-borne diseases to inform the steps needed to identify where and when threats exist and to evaluate the impact of preventive measures. This report summarizes available health records information about the occurrence of vector-borne infectious diseases among members of the U.S. Armed Forces, during a recent 7-year surveillance period. For the 7-surveillance period, there were 1,436 confirmed cases of vector-borne diseases, 536 possible cases, and 8,667 suspected cases among service members of the active and reserve components. •	“Confirmed” case = confirmed reportable medical event. •	“Possible” case = hospitalization with a diagnosis for a vector-borne disease. •	“Suspected” case = either a non-confirmed reportable medical event or an outpatient medical encounter with a diagnosis of a vector-borne disease. Lyme disease (n=721) and malaria (n=346) were the most common diagnoses among confirmed and possible cases. •	In 2015, the annual numbers of confirmed case of Lyme disease were the fewest reported during the surveillance period. •	Diagnoses of Chikungunya (CHIK) and Zika (ZIKV) were elevated in the years following their respective entries into the Western Hemisphere: CHIK (2014 and 2015); ZIKV (2016). The available data reinforce the need for continued emphasis on the multidisciplinary preventive measures necessary to counter the ever-present threat of vector-borne disease. Access the full report in the February 2018 MSMR (Vol. 25, No. 2). Go to www.Health.mil/MSMR  Background graphic shows service member in the field and insects which spread vector borne diseases.

This infographic summarizes available health records information about the occurrence of vector-borne infectious diseases among members of the U.S. Armed Forces, during a recent 7-year surveillance period (2010 – 2016).

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Preventing Mosquito-Borne Illnesses | Chikungunya | Malaria | Zika Virus

Malaria U.S. Armed Forces, 2017

Infographic
2/14/2018
Since 1999, the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR) has published periodic updates on the incidence of malaria among U.S. service members. Malaria infection remains an important health threat to U.S. service members, who are located in endemic areas because of long-term duty assignments, participation in shorter-term contingency operations, or personal travel. This update for 2017 describes the epidemiologic patterns of malaria incidence in active and reserve component service members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Findings •	A total of 32 service members were diagnosed with or reported to have malaria, which is the lowest number of cases in any given year during the 10-year surveillance period. •	Health records documented the performance of laboratory tests for malaria for 22 of the cases. The tests for 17 of the 22 were positive for malaria ( stick figure graphic visually depicts this information). •	In 2017, 75.0% (24 of 32) of malaria cases among U.S. service members were diagnosed during May – October (calendar graphic showing the months visually). •	Of the 32 malaria cases in 2017, more than 1/3 of the infections were considered to have been acquired in Africa. Two bar charts display the following information: •	Bar chart 1: Numbers of malaria cases by Plasmodium species and calendar year of diagnosis/report, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces, 2008 – 2017  •	Bar chart 2: Annual numbers of cases of malaria associated with specific locations of acquisition, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces, 2008 – 2017  The majority of U.S. military members diagnosed with malaria in 2017 were: •	Male (96.9%) •	Active component (81.3%) •	In the Army (75.0%) •	In their 20’s (56.3%) Access the full report in the February 2018 MSMR (Vol. 25 No. 2). Go to www.Health.mil/MSMR  Picture of a mosquito displays on the graphic.

This update for 2017 describes the epidemiologic patterns of malaria incidence in active and reserve component service members of the U.S. Armed Forces.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Lose to win: Some service members struggle with weight

Article
2/7/2018
Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jovanei Taito, shown here receiving his information warfare qualification certificate, credits the ShipShape program for enabling him to pass the Navy's body composition and physical fitness assessments.  (Courtesy photo)

With numbers rising, programs help keep you shipshape

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Heart Health

2018 #ColdReadiness Twitter chat recap: Preventing cold weather injuries for service members and their families

Fact Sheet
2/5/2018

To help protect U.S. armed forces, the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) hosted a live #ColdReadiness Twitter chat on Wednesday, January 24th, 12-1:30 pm EST to discuss what service members and their families need to know about winter safety and preventing cold weather injuries as the temperatures drop. This fact sheet documents highlights from the Twitter chat.

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Winter Safety | Preventive Health | Health Readiness

Outbreak of Influenza and Rhinovirus co-circulation among unvaccinated recruits, U.S. Coast Guard Training Center Cape May, NJ, 24 July – 21 August 2016

Infographic
2/5/2018
On 29 July 2016, the U.S. Coast Guard Training Center Cape May (TCCM), NJ, identified an increase in febrile respiratory illness (FRI) among recruits who were unvaccinated against seasonal influenza as a result of the annual vaccine’s expiration. This report characterizes the outbreak and containment measures implemented at TCCM during the outbreak period. In 2016, respiratory infections affected more than 250,000 U.S. service members and comprised approximately 22% of medical encounters among military recruit populations – who are highly susceptible to respiratory infections. Seasonal influenza and rhinovirus are two of the leading respiratory pathogens. During the Surveillance Period: 115 recruits reported respiratory infection symptoms. Pie chart 1 shows the following data: •	41 (35.7%) suspected cases •	74 (64.3%) confirmed cases Among confirmed cases, lab specimens tested positive for: •	Influenza A 34 (45.9%) •	Rhinovirus 28 (37.8%) •	Influenza A and rhinovirus co-infection 11 (14.9%) •	Rhinovirus and adenovirus co-infection 1 (1.4%) Data above depicted in pie chart 2. •	24 July – 6 August, Influenza predominated •	7 August – 20 August, Rhinovirus predominated Although the outbreak significantly affected operations at TCCM, a timely and comprehensive response resulted in containment of the outbreak within 5 weeks. Key Factor for Outbreak Control •	Rapid detection through FRI sentinel surveillance •	Quick decision-making •	Streamlined response by using a single chain of command •	Rapid implementation of both nonpharmaceutical and pharmaceutical interventions Access the full report in the January 2018 MSMR (Vol. 25, No. 1). Go to: www.Health.mil/MSMR

This report characterizes the outbreak and containment measures implemented at the U.S. Coast Guard Training Center Cape May (TCCM), New Jersey, during a July 24 – August 21, 2016 outbreak period.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Integrated Biosurveillance | Influenza Summary and Reports

Department of Defense Global, Laboratory-based Influenza Surveillance Program’s Influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates and surveillance trends, 2016 – 2017 Influenza Season

Infographic
2/5/2018
Each year, the Department of Defense (DoD) Global, Laboratory-based Influenza Surveillance Program performs surveillance for influenza among service members of the DoD and their dependent family members. In addition to routine surveillance, vaccine effectiveness (VE) studies are performed and results are shared with the Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Health Organization for vaccine evaluation. This report documents the annual surveillance trends for the 2016 – 2017 influenza season and the end-of-season VE results. The analysis was performed by the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Epidemiology Laboratory, and the DoD Influenza Surveillance Program staff at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH. FINDINGS: A total of 5,555 specimens were tested from 84 locations: •	2,486 (44.7%) negative •	1,382 (24.9%) influenza A •	1,093 (19.7%) other respiratory pathogens •	443 (8.0%) influenza B •	151 (2.7%) co-infections The predominant influenza strain was A (H3N2), representing 73.8% of all circulating influenza. Pie chart displays this information. Graph showing the numbers and percentages of respiratory specimens positive for influenza viruses, and numbers of influenza viruses identified, by type, by surveillance week, Department of Defense healthcare beneficiaries, 2016 – 2017 influenza season displays. The vaccine effectiveness (VE) for this season was slightly lower than for the 2015 – 2016 season, which had a 63% (95% confidence interval: 53% - 71%) adjusted VE. The adjusted VE for the 2016 – 2017 season was 48% protective against all types of influenza.  Access the full report in the January 2018 MSMR (Vol. 25, No. 1). Go to: www.Health.mil/MSMR

This infographic documents the annual surveillance trends for the 2016 – 2017 influenza season and the end-of-season vaccine effectiveness.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Influenza Summary and Reports | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Force Health Protection

Global Influenza Summary: February 4, 2018

Report
2/4/2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | AFHSB Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports
<< < ... 11 12 13 14 15  ... > >> 
Showing results 151 - 165 Page 11 of 40

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.