Back to Top Skip to main content

Army Medicine joins forces with civilian hospitals to sustain medical readiness

Army Brig. Gen. Telita Crosland, RHC-Atlantic Commanding General, signs letter of commitment Jan. 18 recognizing the partnership between Army Medicine and Cooper University Health Care to provide advanced surgical trauma training allowing Army medical professionals to sustain their trauma skills by working alongside civilian counterparts at high-volume Level 1 trauma centers. Cooper joins the Oregon Health & Science University as one of the two trauma centers partnering with Army Medicine. (Courtesy photo by Cooper University Health Care ) Army Brig. Gen. Telita Crosland, RHC-Atlantic Commanding General, signs letter of commitment Jan. 18 recognizing the partnership between Army Medicine and Cooper University Health Care to provide advanced surgical trauma training allowing Army medical professionals to sustain their trauma skills by working alongside civilian counterparts at high-volume Level 1 trauma centers. Cooper joins the Oregon Health & Science University as one of the two trauma centers partnering with Army Medicine. (Courtesy photo by Cooper University Health Care )

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Civil Military Medicine

A group of 10 Army medical professionals are the first to participate in a new program designed to help them sustain battlefield medicine skills. But the doctors and nurses are training far from combat support hospitals in austere locations, instead they are honing their skills in two of the nation's civilian teaching hospitals.

The program, called Army Military-Civilian Trauma Team Training (AMCT3), is a two-to-three year program at Cooper University Health Care in Camden, New Jersey, and Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland, Oregon. The goal of the program is to advance military trauma operational readiness for deployment around the globe by partnering with high-volume civilian trauma centers to gain critical teamwork and technical trauma skills.

"We are good at trauma care but remain relentless in our pursuit of zero preventable battlefield casualties," said Army Brig. Gen. Telita Crosland, commanding general, Regional Health Command-Atlantic, who recently signed letters of commitment on behalf of the Army Surgeon General symbolizing the partnership. "Partnerships with leading trauma centers like Cooper and OHSU allows Army Medicine to leverage a national and global network of support that brings us closer to our goal," added Crosland.

The program gives Army surgical teams and individual Soldiers the opportunity to maintain proficiency and sustain their trauma skills by working alongside civilian counter parts at high-volume Level 1 trauma centers, according to Crosland. Level 1 trauma centers are comprehensive regional facilities capable of providing total care for every aspect of injury.

"This is another first for Cooper, and we are honored and proud to train this elite Army medical team," said George E. Norcross III, Chairman of Cooper's Board of Trustees. "As a high-volume, academic tertiary care Level I Trauma Center, our experience and reputation uniquely positions us to provide the hands-on training and skills this elite team needs to help them save lives on battlefields around the world."

The AMCT3 program addresses the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 directive for the Military Health System to establish partnerships to maintain trauma care competency along with developing standardized combat care instruction to enhance quality of care outcomes for trauma care.

"Our military medical treatment facilities lack the case acuity, case volume and case diversity that we need to sustain operational readiness," said John Ramiccio, Program Manager, Civilian Partnerships and Programming, G-3/7 Readiness & Training Division, Army Medical Command. "That is why Congress got involved and mandated it in the NDAA because this has been identified as contributive to addressing battlefield outcomes," added Ramiccio.

The program is also inspired by national efforts to stop preventable deaths in people with traumatic injuries. Research has shown that deaths and disabilities due to trauma can be prevented with better training, coordination and streamlined trauma care systems. AMCT3 promotes a two-way exchange of ideas and can help both military and civilian trauma centers improve outcomes for their patients.

"OHSU is proud to partner with the Army in enabling health care professionals to provide advanced trauma care and experience it from new perspectives," said John Hunter, M.D., OHSU executive vice president and chief executive officer of OHSU Healthcare. "We collaborate because we know it will benefit our patients and help us meet our mission to improve the health and well-being of Oregonians and beyond."

The Soldiers assigned to the program were selected because they have medical specialties typically used in military forward surgical teams, such as emergency medicine physician, trauma surgeon, nurse anesthetist, and intensive care and emergency care nurses.

Beyond their medical specialties, Army Col. Jason Seery, the AMCT3 task force chairman and the Army's senior participant at Cooper University, said the Army looked for Soldiers who could work well with our civilian partners. "They are pathfinders and helping to establish this program for the Soldiers and partner hospitals to follow," said Seery. "We looked for officers who are collaborative, understand the goals of this effort and have a deeper understanding of what trauma team training is about."

One of those officers is Army Capt. Simon Sarkisian, a Forward Surgical Team emergency physician. "I received great training with the military in my emergency medical residency. Here [at Cooper] I'll get to continue that and really get to do trauma, try to excel at trauma and be a trauma expert for the betterment of our Soldiers overseas when we get deployed."

Both Ramiccio and Seery see this strategic partnership as transformational in changing the culture of military medicine from competition to collaboration. "The program is one of the most significant things Army Medicine has done with individual and team readiness in decades," said Seery.

Over the next few years the Army Medical Command hopes to establish at least 10 trauma team training partnerships across the country.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

DHA IPM 19-003: Reserve Health Readiness Program

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Interim Procedures Memorandum (DHA-IPM), based on the authority of References (a) through (c), and in accordance with the guidance of References (d) through (i): • Provides utilization guidance and funding requirements for the RHRP contract to supplement Reserve Component Individual Medical Readiness (IMR) and Deployment Health activities when Service organic health readiness resources are not available to meet mission requirements. • Provides utilization guidance and funding requirements for the RHRP contract for Active Duty enrolled in TRICARE Prime Remote, U.S. Coast Guard (USCG), USCG Reserves, and re-deploying DoD civilians (e.g., U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command). • Communicate procedure guidance to all DoD organizations utilizing RHRP services. • Will expire effective 12 months from the date of issue and be converted to a DHA-Procedural Instruction.

  • Identification #: 19-003
  • Date: 3/8/2019
  • Type: DHA Interim Procedures Memorandum
  • Topics: Health Readiness

DHA PI 6025.07: Naloxone in the MTFs

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Procedural Instruction (DHA-PI), based on the authority of References (a) through (c), and in accordance with the guidance of References (d) through (h), establishes the Defense Health Agency’s (DHA) procedures for prescribing and dispensing naloxone by pharmacists in MTFs to eligible beneficiaries, upon beneficiary request, or when the pharmacist determines the beneficiary meets the established criteria for being at risk for a life-threatening opiate overdose.

DHA PI 6200.05: Force Health Protection Quality Assurance (FHPQA) Program

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Procedural Instruction (DHA-PI), based on the authority of References (a) and (b), and in accordance with the guidance of References (c) through (ab), establishes the procedures for the FHPQA Program as defined in Reference (z). This DHA-PI applies to: a. OSD, the Military Departments (including the United States Coast Guard (USCG) at all times, including when it is a Service in the Department of Homeland Security by agreement with that Department), the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the Inspector General of the DoD, the Defense Agencies, the DoD Field Activities, and all other organizational entities within the DoD (referred to collectively in this DHA-PI as the “DoD Components”). b. Civilian personnel, as defined in Reference (e), and DoD contractor personnel authorized to accompany the force (CAAF), in accordance with References (j), (m), and (n), respectively.

  • Identification #: DHA PI 6200.05
  • Date: 5/2/2018
  • Type: DHA Procedural Instruction
  • Topics: Health Readiness

DoD Instruction 6200.05: Force Health Protection Quality Assurance (FHPQA) Program

Policy

This issuance establishes policy, assigns responsibilities, and defines requirements for the development and establishment of the FHPQA Program in accordance with the authority in DoD Directive (DoDD) 5124.02, Sections 731 and 738 of Public Law 108-375; Sections 1074f, 1092a, and 1073b of Title 10, United States Code; and DoDDs 6200.04 and 5136.13.

DoD Instruction 6490.13: Comprehensive Policy on Traumatic Brain Injury-Related Neurocognitive Assessments by the Military Services

Policy

This instruction establishes policy, assigns responsibilities, and prescribes standard elements, pursuant to section 722 of Public Law 111-383, requiring the implementation of a comprehensive neurocognitive assessment policy in the Military Services.

Embedded Fragment Analyses

Policy

Clarification of the Requirement for Continuation of Semi-Annual Reporting of Results of Embedded Fragment Analyses

Detecting and Reporting DoD Cases of Ebola Virus Disease Infection

Policy

Guidance as of 17 OCT 2014 from the Department of Defese (AFHSC)for Detecting and Reporting DoD Cases of Ebola Virus Disease Infection

Influenza Surveillance Program

Policy

Sentinel Sites for the 2014-2015 Influenza Surveillance Program

Deployment Limiting Mental Disorders and Psychotrophic Medications

Policy

Policy memorandum about Deployment Limiting Mental Disorders and Psychotrophic Medications

DoD Laboratories Participating in CDC Laboratory Response Network 03-213

Policy

Department of Defense (DoD) laboratories participating in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-sponsored Laboratory Response Network (LRN) do so with the approval and support of their respective Military Department Surgeons General.

Medical Planning and Programming Lexicon

Policy

DoD Instruction Number 6490.11: DoD Policy Guidance for Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury/Concussion in the Deployed Setting

Policy

This instruction establishes policy, assigns responsibilities, and provides procedures on the management of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), also known as concussion, in the deployed setting.

Access to Medical Services Who were Exposed to Rabies in Combat Theater

Policy

U.S. Navy/U.S. Marine Corps COSC Policy Update

Policy

Mental Health Assessments for Members of the Armed Forces Deployed in Connection with a Contingency Operation

Policy
<< < 1 2 3 > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 3

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.