Back to Top Skip to main content

Pediatric clinic works to keep children healthy

Air Force Senior Airman Shania Stanford, 366th Medical Support Squadron pediatric clinic aerospace medical technician, checks Jude's vitals during an appointment at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The pediatric clinic takes care of Airmen and their families by ensuring the overall health of their children. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew Kobialka) Air Force Senior Airman Shania Stanford, 366th Medical Support Squadron pediatric clinic aerospace medical technician, checks Jude's vitals during an appointment at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The pediatric clinic takes care of Airmen and their families by ensuring the overall health of their children. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew Kobialka)

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho — A small boy in blue jeans, a grey T-shirt and sporting a blonde comb over with a slight sheen from the gel used to hold it in place is ushered into a room with plain white walls. As he entered, the boy notices a chair to the right of the door. Hanging on the wall above a chair is an otoscope, a medical tool used to look into ears. The boy then rushes to climb up the chair, staring at the tool with a twinkle of what seemed to be curious excitement in his eye.

He continues climbing, laughing at the crinkling of the paper that covers the seat, and reaches for the otoscope. Before he snatches it, Air Force Senior Airman Shania Stanford, 366th Medical Support Squadron pediatrics clinic aerospace medical technician, enters the room. When the boy sees Stanford, he jokingly opens his mouth wide and says “ahh” as if he has done this many times before. A smirk slowly forms as he bursts into a triumphant laughter. He knows the routine and he’s proud of it.

This is 3-year-old Jude at his pediatrics appointment. He has been to the clinic several times and is accustomed to the check-up procedure.

Although not all kids will be as enthusiastic as Jude, all of them will be treated with the professional medical care they need.

The pediatric clinic’s objective is to care for children from birth to the age of 18 and provide military families a peace of mind knowing their kids are in good health.

Stanford said she sees kids like Jude on a daily basis and has learned to adapt to make them as relaxed as possible.

“We change our approach by using softer voices, verbal encouragement, and playfulness when interacting with kids to make them feel more comfortable,” Stanford said. “We also offer incentives, like stickers and candy, to encourage them to be excited about their medical appointments.”

Even so, the doctor’s office can be a really intimidating experience for some children.

“Some patients really like coming to the doctor, and some of them are scared every single time,” Stanford said. “It's just about being patient and gentle with them because they don't understand what we're doing when they're little.”

A welcoming environment is important for families to never hesitate about getting the proper healthcare their kids need.

The clinic prioritizes maintaining top-tier patient care, said Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Goebel, 366th MDSS pediatric clinic NCO in charge.

One of the ways they ensure excellent care is by pre-screening patient records before their appointment to avoid asking repetitive questions. This enables the clinic to efficiently use the time with each patient to perform check-ups and treatments while minimizing administrative redundancy.

Goebel explained that patients who come in for a follow-up appointment will see the same doctor and have the opportunity to establish trust with them to further receive excellent care.

The way the clinic takes care of Airmen is making sure their families are cared for.

“It takes a dedicated team to make that happen,” Goebel said.

Effective teams are made with people who are excited about what they do on a daily basis.

“I am very passionate about my job,” said Stanford. “When it comes to pediatrics, I love kids and I am honored to be one of the people that contributes to their overall health.”

This passion is what creates an internal commitment for pediatric technicians like Stanford to provide excellent care to every child they see.

This care includes providers offering procedures in the clinic such as: circumcisions, incision and drainages, frenectomies and more. Technicians are also trained as immunizations backup technicians (IBTs).

Stanford and the pediatrics team strive each day to ensure the children of Airmen are happy and healthy.

“In the end, my favorite part of my job is seeing patients get better,” said Stanford. “You can see such a difference in their behavior. They go from very lethargic to playful and happy. It’s like a whole new person.”

“That’s what motivates me. That transformation. It’s so rewarding.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Special care given to families experiencing stillbirth or infant loss

Article
10/23/2020
A couple standing in front of a wall covered in notes

The cot is specially designed to give parents extra time with their baby.

Recommended Content:

Women's Health | Children's Health | Men's Health

Weed ACH holds Pregnancy & Infant Loss Awareness month event

Article
10/22/2020
Group of people standing outside hospital

[I]t's important to acknowledge pregnancy and infant loss awareness events because it isn’t healthy for families to suffer in silence.

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Women's Health

Sesame Street supports military families with health care transitions

Article
9/15/2020
Sesame Street character comforts a military child during a doctor visit.

This article introduces the new Sesame Street for Military Families: Transitions in Health Care section and how it can support military families as they transition to new health care providers.

Recommended Content:

Children's Health

Back-to-school vaccinations in the age of coronavirus

Article
8/12/2020
Medical technician wearing a mask, filling an immunization needle

DHA experts answer questions about back-to-school vaccines

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Public Health | Preventive Health | Children's Health | Immunizations

Talking with Children about TBI

Publication
8/3/2020

This guide offers communication techniques to parents or guardians who are struggling to help their children understand the changes in a loved one who sustained a TBI. It features specific communication techniques based on the age and stage of development of the child.

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury | TBI Resources | Children's Health

BAMC follows through with redesignation of Army’s WTBs

Article
6/16/2020
Soldier in front of flag speaking into microphone

Brooke Army Medical Center’s WTB made the formal announcement of the pending change on June 3, 2020, with a brief tree dedication ceremony.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Defending the Homeland: WRNMMC on front line of COVID-19 war

Article
4/29/2020
Image of soldiers and businessman in suit walking through an emergency shelter lined with beds and medical equipment

For patient and staff safety, WRNMMC started restricted access control points March 12.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Dating violence has consequences for teen victims

Article
2/28/2020
Midori Robinson, Kyleigh Rose and Keisha McNeill paint their hands so they can put a handprint on the “Love is Respect” mural during the Camp Zama Youth Center Teen Dating Violence Awareness Lock-In at Camp Zama. (U.S. Army photo by Winifred Brown)

Resources available to help military families respond

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Total Force Fitness

DHA Director discusses vision for future

Article
2/25/2020
Lt. Gen. Ronald Place, Director, Defense Health Agency, visits with the staff of the Stuttgart Army Health Clinic in Germany.  Since becoming DHA Director, Lt. Gen. Place has focused on creating great outcomes for the beneficiaries who rely on the Military Health System for their health care.

DHA is providing a more integrated system of readiness and health

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Department Of Defense Health Affairs Media Roundtable Announcement of NDAA 2017, Section 703(d) Report to Congress

Congressional Testimony
2/19/2020

Thomas McCaffery, Assistant Secretary Of Defense For Health Affairs; Dr. David Smith, Reform Leader For Health Care Management; and Lieutenant General Ronald Place, Director, Defense Health Agency, participated in a Health Affairs Media Roundtable following the announcement that the NDAA 2017, Section 703(d) Report was submitted to Congress.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | MHS Transformation

NDAA Section 703 Report to Congress

Congressional Testimony
2/18/2020

This report provides the Department's recommendations for changes in military treatment facilities to meet the criteria established in 10 U.S.C. § 1073d

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

45th Medical Group Patrick Air Force Base (AFB) Vol 2

Report
2/18/2020

The table below summarizes the findings and data informing the decision on the future of the Military Medical Treatment Facility (MTF).

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

AF-H-633d MEDGRP-Langley – Joint Base Langley-Eustis (JBLE) Vol 1

Report
2/18/2020

The table below summarizes the findings and data informing the decision on the future of the Military Medical Treatment Facility (MTF).

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

45th Medical Group Patrick Air Force Base (AFB) Vol 1

Report
2/18/2020

The table below summarizes the findings and data informing the decision on the future of the Military Medical Treatment Facility (MTF).

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

42nd Medical Group, Maxwell Air Force Base (AFB) Vol 1

Report
2/18/2020

The table below summarizes the findings and data informing the decision on the future of the Military Medical Treatment Facility (MTF).

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 15

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.