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Take Command of your health during Men’s Health Month

Take Command of Your Health Take Command of Your Health

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Men, are you taking command of your health? Taking command of your health means making positive decisions each day that contribute to your overall physical and mental wellness.

Men’s Health Month is a great time to focus on taking preventive steps and making small changes to your lifestyle. You can start by getting familiar with the preventive services that TRICARE covers and health issues that more frequently affect men. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the leading cause of death among men in the U.S. is heart disease. Some of the factors that lead to heart disease and stroke are preventable, especially with early detection and timely treatment.

Here are a few tips for men to get and stay healthy, happy, and strong: 

  • Visit Your Doctor - Make an appointment. A yearly Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Examination is covered if enrolled in TRICARE Prime or TRICARE Select. TRICARE covers clinical preventive screenings. Your doctor can help you decide what tests you need based on your age and risk factors. Some important health tests for men include:
    • Blood pressure and cardiovascular screenings
    • Colorectal, prostate, testicular, and skin cancer exams
  • Develop a Good Relationship with Your Provider - During your visits, be honest about your health concerns. Open communication can prevent misdiagnoses and unnecessary tests. Use these tips for talking to your doctor from the National Institutes of Health before your next appointment. And if you don’t have a primary care manager or need help finding a doctor, use Find a Doctor on the TRICARE website.
  • Be Aware of Signs and Symptoms - Notice potential health concerns, beyond when you’re sick or injured. Pay attention to that mole, persistent cough, or other symptom that seems new or unusual. Get familiar with your family’s health history. Your provider can assess your risk of disease based on your family history and other factors.
  • Develop a Healthy Lifestyle - Exercise regularly, get enough sleep, and eat healthy balanced meals to stay in control of your mental and physical health. If you feel depressed, seek help. Your doctor can help you identify problems, like being overweight or feeling anxious. Learn about mental health services that TRICARE covers.

This June, take steps to get healthy, schedule the health care visits you need, and take command of your health. Go to the Military Health System Men’s Health Month spotlight to learn more about health issues important to men.

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