Back to Top Skip to main content

Army distributes 1.5 million flu vaccines

Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Alexander Wrigel (right), a medic assigned to Task Group 68.6, forward deployed to Camp Lemonnier, administers a flu shot to Navy Lt. Cmdr. Hector Ubinas. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joe Rullo) Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Alexander Wrigel (right), a medic assigned to Task Group 68.6, forward deployed to Camp Lemonnier, administers a flu shot to Navy Lt. Cmdr. Hector Ubinas. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joe Rullo)

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Immunizations | Medical Logistics

As flu season kicks off, the U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency’s Distribution Operations Center (DOC) manages the distribution of more than 1.5 million doses of influenza vaccine to help Soldiers and their families stay healthy.

DOC officials said the first batch of vaccines shipped on Sept. 6, headed to active-duty troops, reserves, retirees and their family members, as well as National Guard units across the country.

“Anywhere an Army Soldier is, that’s where we will get them the flu vaccine,” said Army Lt. Col. Todd A. Reeder, DOC director.

As of Oct. 1, Army vaccines shipped totaled 467,000 doses, or about 30 percent of the Army’s requested allotment.

The Army’s allotment accounts for the majority of the 3.3 million doses being distributed throughout the Department of Defense, which sets an annual goal of having at least 90% of all active-duty military members vaccinated by Jan. 15, 2020.

While the flu virus circulates year-round, activity typically begins to increase in October and spikes between December and February, even though seasonal activity can last until May, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That was the case last flu season, which lasted 21 weeks. It was the longest flu season in the U.S. over the past decade.

The CDC estimates that, on average, between 5 to 20 percent of people in the U.S. are affected by the flu each season, with children and the elderly more susceptible.

Now 10 years since the H1N1 flu pandemic of 2009, the flu remains as a very real threat to military readiness. Reeder said it is not something the Army takes lightly.

“You could potentially take out a whole unit, making that unit ineffective or non-deployable if the flu virus is introduced into that unit,” he said. “This is why the Army stresses that each Soldier get vaccinated annually with the flu vaccine in order to maintain unit and Soldier readiness.”

To prepare, the DOC within USAMMA – a direct-reporting unit to the new Army Medical Logistics Command, headquartered at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Maryland – works with the Defense Health Agency and the Defense Logistics Agency, which handles the yearly procurement and shipping for the DoD.

Liz Andrews, deputy director of the DOC, said planning is a year-round effort.

“There is no downtime, even though we only ship three months a year,” she said.

Even before the current flu season ends, Andrews said a forecast for the next season and dosage requests are sent out to Army installations around the globe each January.

From there, the number of requested doses are submitted to the DHA, which then coordinates with the DLA to handle the contracting process, she said.

Reeder said the CDC works directly with the flu vaccine manufacturers to forecast the upcoming flu season in order to develop the specific vaccine each year.

Doses come in different forms to treat a wide range of people, from infants 6 months and older to those over 65 years of age.

The CDC recommends people get a yearly flu shot by the end of October. Kids from 6 months to 8 years may require two doses, given about a month apart.

According to the CDC, “Vaccination efforts should continue throughout the flu season because the duration of the influenza season varies, and influenza activity might not occur in certain communities until February or March.

“Although vaccination by the end of October is recommended, vaccine administered in December or later, even if influenza activity has already begun, might be beneficial in the majority of influenza seasons.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

World AIDS Day puts spotlight on landmark DoD study

Article
12/2/2019
Dr. John Mascola, director of the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center, discusses HIV vaccine progress at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Nov. 26, during a World AIDS Day commemoration.  (U.S. Army photo)

Vaccine study shows infection risk lowered by 31 percent, offering hope for future

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Research and Innovation | Global Health Engagement

Preventing seasonal influenza

Article
11/13/2019
Air Force Staff Sgt. Jaqueline Mbugua and members of the Massachusetts Air National Guard’s 102nd Medical Group traveled to the Roxy Theater on Joint Base Cape Cod to provide flu shots to Airmen Nov. 2, 2019. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Thomas Swanson).

The best way to prevent the flu is to get vaccinated every year

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Immunization Healthcare | Immunizations

Joint Deployment Formulary - October 2019

Publication
10/24/2019

Formulary for the Deployment Prescription Program.

Recommended Content:

Deployment Prescription Program | Medical Logistics | Joint Deployment Formulary

Measles Myths: The Measles Can Be Life-Threatening

Video
9/30/2019
Measles Myths: The Measles Can Be Life-Threatening

Measles can be life-threatening, especially for children and among people who have a compromised immune system.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health | Immunizations | Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Measles-Mumps-Rubella

Autumn ushers in season of falling under the weather with flu

Article
9/26/2019
A bronze bench and statue near the America Building at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, memorializes military dependent Trevor Lin. The 7-year-old's death in the fall of 2009 was attributed to influenza.  (Photo courtesy of Walter Reed-Bethesda)

Health care experts: Everyone 6 months and older should get vaccine

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Immunizations

DoD, HHS implement Executive Order to modernize flu vaccines

Article
9/25/2019
Health care experts recommend that everyone 6 months and older – including the elderly, chronically ill people, and expectant mothers – receive the flu vaccine as soon as it becomes available. (DoD photo)

New task force aims to increase efficiency, effectiveness

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Immunizations

Measles Myths: Hand Washing Alone Won't Prevent Measles

Video
9/23/2019
Measles Myths: Hand Washing Alone Won't Prevent Measles

Hand washing alone will not prevent the spread of measles. Dr. Margaret Ryan, preventive medicine physician, debunks some myths about vaccinations.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health | Immunizations | Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Measles-Mumps-Rubella

Measles Myths: Vaccines Are Safe

Video
9/17/2019
Measles Myths: Vaccines Are Safe

Vaccine components have been rigorously tested for safety. Dr. Margaret Ryan, preventive medicine physician, debunks some myths about vaccinations.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health | Immunizations | Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Measles-Mumps-Rubella

Measles Myths: Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism

Video
9/12/2019
Measles Myths: Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism

Vaccines that prevent measles do not cause autism. Dr. Margaret Ryan, preventive medicine physician, debunks some myths about vaccinations.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health | Immunizations | Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Measles-Mumps-Rubella | Autism Care Demonstration

Prevent to Protect: Rosarios

Video
8/30/2019
Prevent to Protect: Rosarios

10-year-old Tatiana Rosario has a weakened immune system as a result of her cancer treatment. Growing up, she and her family made sacrifices to keep her safe from disease.

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Preventive Health | Immunizations

Prevent to Protect: Immunization Awareness

Video
8/30/2019
Prevent to Protect: Immunization Awareness

Getting vaccinated not only protects yourself and your family from deadly diseases, but it also saves the lives to those who don’t have the immune system to fend for themselves. The Military Health System shares the stories of families with children who are at risk when others aren’t immunized.

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Preventive Health | Immunizations

Prevent to Protect: Barbara and Floriann

Video
8/30/2019
Prevent to Protect: Barbara and Floriann

Barbara’s son Floriann grew up with an immune dysregulation. A Uniformed Services University pathology professor, she’s experienced first hand the importance of vaccines.

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Preventive Health | Immunizations

Prevent to Protect: Analia

Video
8/30/2019
Prevent to Protect: Analia

Cancer left 5-year-old Analia Pages unable to get vaccinated. Her father, Master Sgt. Edward Pages, has to take extra steps to protect her from diseases she’s susceptible to.

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Preventive Health | Immunizations

DHA IPM 19-006: 2019–2020 Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Program (IVP)

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Interim Procedures Memorandum (DHA-IPM), based on the authority of References (a) and (b), and in accordance with the guidance of References (c) through (o), implementing instructions, assigns responsibilities, and prescribes procedures for the seasonal influenza vaccination program. • This DHA-IPM cancels and reissues DHA-IPM 18-005. • This DHA-IPM is effective immediately and will expire 12 months from the date of issue.

DHA plus DLA equals one joint approach for health care logistics

Article
8/20/2019
Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, DHA director (left), and Army Lt. Gen. Darrell Williams, DLA director (right) signed a memorandum of agreement on Aug. 15, at Defense Health Headquarters. The agreement clarifies the agencies' complementary roles and responsibilities, avoiding duplication of effort while retaining DLA as DHA's acquisition enabler of choice for medical materiel. (MHS photo)

Agency directors sign memorandum of agreement

Recommended Content:

Combat Support | Medical Logistics
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 7

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.