Back to Top Skip to main content

Womack Army Medical Center named Level III trauma center

Local medical partners conduct a 'trace the trauma' tour Nov. 6 after Womack Army Medical Center celebrated their integration into the North Carolina American College of Surgeons Level III Trauma designation. (U.S. Army photo by Twana Atkinson) Local medical partners conduct a 'trace the trauma' tour Nov. 6 after Womack Army Medical Center celebrated their integration into the North Carolina American College of Surgeons Level III Trauma designation. (U.S. Army photo by Twana Atkinson)

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Womack Army Medical Center was designated as one of three trauma centers in a 10-county radius Nov. 6.

The American College of Surgeons accredits WAMC as a Level III trauma center as able to provide complex healthcare delivery to Soldiers and family members of the home of the Airborne & Special Operations.

Jennifer Carney, trauma program coordinator at Womack, explained how the designation increases the capabilities as a power projection platform in the worldwide joint trauma system.

“Becoming a level three trauma center has helped to streamline and correct processes that affect the care of our traumatically injured population,” said Carney. “The program provides a feedback mechanism in which we can continually improve how we perform trauma care.”

The ACS Verification, Review, and Consultation Program is designed to assist hospitals in the evaluation and improvement of trauma care and provide objective, external review of institutional capability and performance.

Army Col. John Melton, the Womack hospital commander, addresses the audience during his speech stating, “Today, trauma is the leading cause of death and disability for Americans age 45 and younger. Reports suggest one of five civilian trauma deaths and one of four military trauma deaths could be prevented.”

North Carolina has developed an inclusive trauma system that is organized, multi-disciplinary and evidence-based in its approaches to providing quality care and improving measurable outcomes for all defined injured patients.

“You are now part of the North Carolina trauma system, but you are also now part of the North Carolina trauma family,” said Dr. James Winslow, the medical director North Carolina Office of Emergency Medical Services.

These functions are accomplished by an on-site review of the hospital by a peer team, experienced in the field of trauma care. The team assesses commitment, readiness, resources, policies, patient care, performance improvement, and other relevant features of the program.

The designation also required state and federal partnerships to become ACS verified and North Carolina designated and part of the University of North Carolina Medical Center Mid-Carolina Regional Advisory Committee and North Carolina Trauma System.

“We are also able to assure that staff is adequately trained to be ready to accept various injuries at any time of the day for our community,” said Carney. “The program is also able to provide community education on the “Stop the Bleed” initiative to any DoD affiliate, further assisting with moving toward zero preventable deaths.”

“What I see are allied and coalition partners – with a common purpose to build host nation, state, and county trauma capability right here in central North Carolina, said Melton.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

New simulator preps WBAMC staff for OB emergencies

Article
5/1/2018
Regina Vadney, nurse midwife, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, evaluates a medical manikin using WBAMC's new simulation system which provides cutting-edge training to medical staff during a simulated postpartum hemorrhage scenario. The new simulation system aims to increase communication, and improve interdisciplinary and clinical performance of staff when treating obstetric emergencies. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

The state-of-the-art simulator provides medical staff up to various cutting-edge training scenarios

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Women's Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Surgeons general testify on medical readiness at senate hearing

Article
4/30/2018
Air Force Maj. Michael Rawlins, 60th Surgical Operations Squadron, takes out a piece of stomach during a surgery at David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis Air Force Base, California. (U.S. Air Force by photo Louis Briscese)

The services’ surgeons general updated senators on Capitol Hill on the needs and priorities of military health programs

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Health Readiness

Occupational therapists showcase their grasp for your grip

Article
4/24/2018
Navy Cmdr. Christopher Keith, Naval Hospital Bremerton Director Clinical Support Services attempts his grip on the hand dynamometer to not only test his isometric strength, but more importantly, gauge for other health conditions such as cerebrovascular accident, or what is more commonly known as a stroke. (U.S. Navy photo by Douglas Stutz)

Occupational therapists use a holistic approach to rehabilitate and treat physical, psychological and even emotional injuries

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

RESET improves pediatric care

Article
4/18/2018
Air Force Capt. Joseph Migliuri, 92nd Medical Group pediatrician, performs a wellness vision exam during a patient’s check-up at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The pediatric team has implemented a new concept of operations: rewarding, efficiency, setting priorities and empowering team members, or RESET, to their system of patient care. The integration of RESET in the Military Health System Genesis workflow has improved the clinic’s goals of patient access and care. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Whitney Laine)

The aim of RESET is to improve access to care for the patient population

Recommended Content:

Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Military providers seek tailored approach to treating PTSD

Article
3/14/2018
The VA/DoD clinical practice guideline for managing post-traumatic stress disorder and acute stress disorder recommends against prescribing benzodiazepines. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

New tool reviews, monitors provider prescribing habits

Recommended Content:

Mental Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Advancements in telehealth improve access to healthcare

Article
2/23/2018
Air Force Medical Service Seal

Telehealth brings a range of services all working together to improve access

Recommended Content:

Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Technology

Air Force robotic surgery training program aims at improving patient outcomes

Article
2/9/2018
Air Force Col. Debra Lovette (left), 81st Training Wing commander, receives a briefing from Air Force 2nd Lt. Nina Hoskins, 81st Surgical Operations squadron room nurse, on robotics surgery capabilities inside the robotics surgery clinic at Keesler Medical Center, Mississippi. The training program stood up in March 2017 and has trained surgical teams within the Air Force and across the Department of the Defense. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue).

Robotic surgery is becoming the standard of care for many specialties and procedures

Recommended Content:

Technology | Innovation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

A Family's Smile

Video
9/27/2017
A Family's Smile

Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) Kerry Latham restored quality of life to Killian McKinney, a baby with a cleft lip and palate, during a plastic surgery procedure at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda Md., Aug. 28, 2017. By treating McKinney, Latham supported the McKinney military family and enabled them to focus on the mission.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Secretary Shulkin talks with Providers about Prosthetics

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Secretary Shulkin tours Walter Reed

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Secretary Shulkin meets service dogs Walter Reed

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Secretary Shulkin visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Why do you want to be a military doctor?

Video
3/30/2017
Why do you want to be a military doctor?

During the 2017 Military Health System Female Physician Leadership Conference, we asked some military medical students and junior officers to share why they want to be a military medical doctor.

Recommended Content:

Access, Cost, Quality, and Safety | Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Walter Reed Bethesda terrain park

Photo
11/1/2016
The new terrain park outside of the Military Advanced Training Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center provides another means for Walter Reed Bethesda physical therapists to simulate uneven terrain for their amputee patients without having to go to specific destinations to do so. (DoD photo by Mark Oswell)

The new terrain park outside of the Military Advanced Training Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center provides another means for Walter Reed Bethesda physical therapists to simulate uneven terrain for their amputee patients without having to go to specific destinations to do so. (DoD photo by Mark Oswell)

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

FBCH Emergency Room

Photo
11/1/2016
Fort Belvoir Community Hospital Emergency Room (U.S. Army photo by Reese Brown)

Fort Belvoir Community Hospital Emergency Room (U.S. Army photo by Reese Brown)

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics
<< < ... 6 7 8 > >> 
Showing results 91 - 105 Page 7 of 8

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.