Back to Top Skip to main content

Artificial intelligence makes its way to dermatology clinic

Air Force Maj. Thomas Beachkofsky, 6th Health Care Operations Squadron dermatologist, uses a body scanner microscope to take a picture of a spot on his arm at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida. A new software upgrade allows a complex algorithm to analyze an image captured with a camera and rate the severity of the spot for a dermatologist to review. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Adam R. Shanks) Air Force Maj. Thomas Beachkofsky, 6th Health Care Operations Squadron dermatologist, uses a body scanner microscope to take a picture of a spot on his arm at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida. A new software upgrade allows a complex algorithm to analyze an image captured with a camera and rate the severity of the spot for a dermatologist to review. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Adam R. Shanks)

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Technology

MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. — The dermatology clinic at MacDill Air Force Base boasts a machine that can help patients log and track various skin conditions over time.

The software's ability to use high resolution photos of the patients’ body and intelligently detect when new marks appear and grow larger allows Air Force Maj. Thomas Beachkofsky, the 6th Health Care Operations Squadron dermatologist, easily to monitor areas of concern with his patients.

However, a new software upgrade that takes advantage of machine learning has opened up new opportunities to use this machine, which is one of two in the Air Force.

“Our new software that works with our body scanner uses artificial intelligence and machine learning to analyze a lesion or mark on the skin and uses an algorithm to rate the likelihood that the spot is harmful,” said Beachkofsky. “With training, our dermatology technicians can use this program to efficiently scan and process questionable spots.”

Beachkofsky explained that although the machine makes an educated guess on the severity of the lesion, it is up to a fully-trained dermatologist to make a diagnosis and recommend treatment.

Air Force Lt. Col. Kurtis Kobes, the 6th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron dental flight commander, was among the first to benefit from the new software, after seeking a second glance at MacDill’s clinic for a spot on his forearm.

“Based on how it looked, and the results from the scan, I ordered a biopsy which came back as melanoma in situ,” remarked Beachkofsky.

Melanoma in situ, also called stage zero melanoma, is a very early stage of cancer where the cancerous cells only affect the epidermis and have not spread to deeper layers of the skin.

“It’s very fortunate that something like this was caught in as early of a stage as it did,” remarked Beachkofsky. “Melanoma can be deadly if left to spread, so treating it while it’s in situ allows a simple procedure with a fast recovery.”

With the new software upgrade, the dermatology office hopes to give its patients the peace of mind that their questionable spots can be checked accurately and efficiently.

“I’m very grateful for the dermatology clinic quickly verifying and handling the suspicious area on my forearm,” said Kobes. “I’ve had this spot for over a year, and after having it looked at by other clinics, I was only told it could be monitored, but it didn’t look alarming.”

In a study named “Man against machine,” the deep-learning algorithm used by the analyzing software was able to correctly identify 95% of malignant skin tumors. This data was compared to 58 dermatologists across 17 nations, who were able to successfully identify 86.6% of the same tumors.

“It’s definitely not a replacement for doctors, nor is AI taking over health care,” laughed Beachkofsky. “It’s mostly a tool for a dermatologist to get a second opinion from a system that has analyzed tens of thousands of lesions and is constantly learning.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Smartphone Apps for Psychological Health: A Brief State of the Science Review

Publication
5/14/2019

In this brief state of the science review, we provide a synopsis of the literature on psychological health mobile applications (apps) and discuss the impact of mobile technology on psychological health practice. We describe the variety of psychological health app uses from self-management, skills training, and supportive care to symptom tracking and data collection; and we summarize the current evidence for the efficacy and effectiveness of psychological health apps. Finally, we offer some pragmatic suggestions for evaluating psychological health apps for quality and clinical utility.

Recommended Content:

Technology | Connected Health

Cultural Considerations in Using Mobile Health in Clinical Care With Military and Veteran Populations

Publication
5/14/2019

Traditional cultural models typically address factors like ethnicity, language, and race as important concerns pertaining to treatment efficacy, but over the years, professionals have expanded the focus to include gender, sexual orientation, age, socioeconomic status, and other aspects of identity and experience, including military cultural issues. As the integration of mobile health increases in clinical care, another important cultural factor that can impact care is technological culture. Differences in perception of technological competence by patient and provider can impact the provider’s ability to effectively connect with the patient and fully leverage tools to support evidence-based treatment.

Recommended Content:

Technology | Connected Health

Mobile Applications for Client Use: Ethical and Legal Considerations

Publication
5/14/2019

Mobile applications (apps) to support behavioral health are increasing in number and are recommended frequently by medical providers in a variety of settings. As with the use of any adjunct tool in therapy, psychologists adopting new technologies in clinical practice must comply with relevant professional ethics codes and legal standards. However, emerging technologies can outpace regulations regarding their use, presenting novel ethical considerations. Therefore, it is incumbent upon providers to extrapolate current ethical standards and laws to new technologies before they recommend them as adjuncts to face-to-face treatment. This article identifies best practices for incorporating apps into treatment, including competence in the use of smartphones in general and familiarity with the specific apps recommended.

Recommended Content:

Technology | Connected Health

Cyberfit Family Crossword Puzzle 2018

Publication
11/7/2018

This crossword puzzle provides tips to keep everyone in your family safe online in cyberspace

Recommended Content:

Technology

Cyberfit Poster Navy Family 2018

Publication
10/5/2018

This poster urges Navy personnel to teach their children online safety.

Recommended Content:

Technology

Cyberfit Poster Baby Monitor 2018

Publication
10/5/2018

This poster urges military families to make sure their baby monitors and home internet connection are properly secure.

Recommended Content:

Technology

Cyberfit Poster: AirForce Family 2018

Publication
10/5/2018

This poster urges AirForce personnel to teach their children online safety.

Recommended Content:

Technology

Cyberfit Poster: Military Family Readiness 2018

Publication
10/5/2018

This poster urges military personnel to teach their children online safety.

Recommended Content:

Technology

Cyberfit Poster Guard Your Cell Phone 2018

Publication
10/5/2018

This poster urges military families to keep an eye on their cell phones, as anyone could take them, even their dog.

Recommended Content:

Technology

Cyberfit Poster Think Twice 2018

Publication
10/5/2018

This poster urges military family members to think twice before posting something online.

Recommended Content:

Technology

Cyberfit Poster: Work with Kids 2018

Publication
10/5/2018

This poster urges military parents to make sure their families are CyberFit.

Recommended Content:

Technology

MHS GENESIS Postcard

Publication
9/5/2017

This postcard is for MHS GENESIS locations to provide to beneficiaries as introductory information.

Recommended Content:

MHS GENESIS | Military Health System Electronic Health Record | Technology

MHS GENESIS Brand Style Guide, Version 13.0

Publication
4/26/2017

The purpose of this style guide is to establish the MHS GENESIS brand guidelines and educate its users to observe the brand standards. Branding is a key supporting element for communication, training and deployment activities.

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Electronic Health Record | Technology | MHS GENESIS Branding

Military Health System's Guide to Access Success

Publication
12/15/2008

This document establishes roles, responsibilities, definitions and guidance for implementing, sustaining and managing military treatment facility (MTF) Access to Care (ATC) in the Military Health System (MHS).

Recommended Content:

Access, Cost, Quality, and Safety | Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics
Showing results 1 - 14 Page 1 of 1

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.