Back to Top Skip to main content

Military medical reform is an opportunity to make trauma care better

Army Lt. Gen. R. Scott Dingle, U.S. Army Surgeon General, spoke to surgeons at the Defense Committee on Trauma and Committees on Surgical and En Route Combat Casualty Care Conference held in San Antonio, Texas, on November 13. He spoke about the plans for current and future trauma and surgical initiatives within Army Medicine and that surgeons must be involved in improving trauma care during this time of military medical reform. (U.S. Army Image by Rebecca Westfall) Army Lt. Gen. R. Scott Dingle, U.S. Army Surgeon General, spoke to surgeons at the Defense Committee on Trauma and Committees on Surgical and En Route Combat Casualty Care Conference held in San Antonio, Texas, on November 13. He spoke about the plans for current and future trauma and surgical initiatives within Army Medicine and that surgeons must be involved in improving trauma care during this time of military medical reform. (U.S. Army photo by Rebecca Westfall)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

SAN ANTONIO, Texas – “I am biased, I believe that our Surgeons are the best in the world,” said U.S. Army Surgeon General, Lt. Gen. R. Scott Dingle, at the Defense Committee on Trauma (DCOT), Committees on Surgical and En Route Combat Casualty Care (CCC) Conference on November 13, in San Antonio, Texas.

As a medical recruiting brigade commander, Dingle would go to universities where presidents and deans of the schools would tell him, “Your surgeons are rewriting the standards and practices for trauma care. We are setting up our trauma system on what you do in the military.”

Dingle explained to the audience of Army surgeons that the atmosphere within the pentagon is different for Army Medicine. There is an opportunity to bring real change to how the military handles combat trauma care.

“The CSA said, I need you to come with innovative changes, and that is what the Army Ready Surgical Force Campaign Task Force (ARSFC TF) is working on. We are going to bring change,” said Dingle.

The task force is working to synergize the Army’s ongoing skills sustainment efforts with Department of Defense, Veterans Affairs, and our civilian trauma partners, to serve as medical readiness platforms for surgical skills sustainment. Solutions to continually improve the Army trauma system require a multifaceted, collaborative approach that includes partnerships, training and research investments, and competitive financial incentives to recruit and retain qualified surgeons to fill gaps.

Programs already in place include the Army Military-Civilian Trauma Team Training (AMCT3) partnerships that deliver vital medical training opportunities by embedding a 15 person team in a civilian trauma center for 2-3 years. Agreements are currently in place at Camden, New Jersey; Portland, Oregon; and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, with two additional sites being implemented at Vanderbilt, Tennessee, and Seattle, Washington.

The Army has also implemented the Strategic Medical Asset Readiness and Training (SMART) program which allows teams to train 119 Army medical positions in a two week trauma rotation at programs in Cincinnati, Ohio; Hackensack, New Jersey; San Juan, Puerto Rico; Camden, New Jersey; and Laredo, Texas.

Dingle stated that he is encouraging other approaches including the development of Individual Collective Tasks Lists (ICTLs) and Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSAs) that define and quantify the requirements to keep individuals ready to deliver the best trauma care as well as leveraging advancements in simulation and synthetic training to keep medical personnel trained and ready.

“Things are moving at the speed of relevance and if we aren’t relevant to today’s fight, then we’ll become extinct,” said Dingle.

The task force is looking to ensure larger roles and training opportunities in military exercises such as Medical Readiness Exercises (MEDREX) in support of U.S. Army Africa (USARAF), Expeditionary Resuscitative Surgical Team (ERST) in support of AFRICOM, Expeditionary Health Readiness Platform – Honduras (EHRP-H) in Support of ARSOUTH, and Global Health Engagement (GHE) Medical Readiness Training Exercise (MEDRETE) in support of ARSOUTH.

Dingle urged the audience to provide feedback and have honest discussions on how to improve trauma care and surgical readiness. “I can’t change the past but together we can change the future,” said Dingle. “We can get it right, but it’s not me, it’s we. It’s going to take all of us to bring change.”

Following the remarks, Dingle joined Lt. Gen. Ronald Place, Director, Defense Health Agency, and Brig. Gen. Wendy Harter, Commanding General, Brooke Army Medical Center, for a senior leader round table discussion to field questions from surgeons.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity.  Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Eat well, live well

Article
3/20/2019
From left, Air Force Capt. Abigail Schutz, 39th Medical Operations Squadron health promotions element chief, Staff Sgt. Jennifer Mancini, 39th MDOS health promotions technician, and Tech. Sgt. Brian Phillips, 39th MDOS health promotions flight NCO in charge, pose for a photo at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. Learning about proper nutrition can help service members stay healthy and ensure they’re in optimal warfighting shape. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Wisher)

Fad diets come and go, but basic nutrition has staying power

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Nutrition

Airmen perform in-flight Transportation Isolation System training

Article
3/14/2019
A C-17 Globemaster III is prepped to transport a Transportation Isolation System during a training exercise that allows Airmen to practice the most effective and safest form of transportation for patients and their medical professionals. Engineered and implemented after the Ebola virus outbreak in 2014, the TIS is an enclosure the Defense Department can use to safely transport patients with highly contagious diseases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody Miller)

This mission capability is the only one of its kind in the Department of Defense

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Technology

Sudden cardiac death in young athletes

Article
3/7/2019
High school basketball requires skill and rigorous training. In rare but highly publicized cases, it can also bring cardiac issues to the surface. (U.S. Army photo by Chuck Gannon)

Sudden cardiac events can occur in seemingly healthy young people in their teens or twenties, including young servicemembers

Recommended Content:

Conditions and Treatments | Health Readiness | Heart Health | Preventive Health

Military health leaders take part in inaugural American Red Cross Advanced Life Support class

Article
3/4/2019
“It was important to me to have firsthand knowledge of the American Red Cross curriculum we’ll be rolling out to the rest of the MHS,” said Air Force Brig. Gen. Sharon Bannister, Deputy Assistant Director for Education and Training. Bannister said being able to train and test alongside students in their third year of medical school was one of the best parts of the day. (MHS photo)

The transition to the American Red Cross Resuscitation Suite officially began October 1, 2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

Air Force units partner for aeromedical evacuation exercise

Article
2/27/2019
Airmen from the 384th Air Refueling Squadron and 18th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron pause after completing set-up and loading of a KC-135 Stratotanker for a AE exercise near Kadena Air Base, Japan. While pilots are in charge of flying a KC-135, refueling boom operators are in charge of the rest of the aircraft, which can be fitted for cargo, passenger transport or medical support. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Lackey)

With a critical care mission spanning half the globe, practicing is vital to patient survivability

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

The eyes have it: Seven tips for maintaining vision

Article
2/25/2019
Army Reserve Spc. Brianne Coots performs an exam during a readiness training event in 2018 at Kea’au, Hawaii. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Stephanie Ramirez)

Most eye injuries are preventable, experts say

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Vision Loss

Military health care transitions to new life support training provider

Article
2/20/2019
Navy Chief Petty Officer Wendy Wright, a hospital corpsman chief assigned to Expeditionary Medical Facility Great Lakes in Illinois, performs ventilation techniques on a practice mannequin while participating in a life support simulation in Savannah, Georgia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caila Arahood)

American Red Cross courses better suited to military needs

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Emergency Preparedness and Response

The simple – and complicated – task of shoveling snow

Article
2/5/2019
Army Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Seifridsberger shovels knee-deep snow to build a simulated hasty firing position during training exercise Ready Force Breach at Fort Drum, New York. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Andrew Carroll)

When in the throes of winter weather, there are ways to prepare for a successful, injury-free snow shoveling activity

Recommended Content:

Winter Safety | Reserve Health Readiness Program | Health Readiness | Physical Activity

Army Medicine joins forces with civilian hospitals to sustain medical readiness

Article
1/31/2019
Army Brig. Gen. Telita Crosland, RHC-Atlantic Commanding General, signs letter of commitment Jan. 18 recognizing the partnership between Army Medicine and Cooper University Health Care to provide advanced surgical trauma training allowing Army medical professionals to sustain their trauma skills by working alongside civilian counterparts at high-volume Level 1 trauma centers. Cooper joins the Oregon Health & Science University as one of the two trauma centers partnering with Army Medicine. (Courtesy photo by Cooper University Health Care )

The AMCT3 program addresses the 2017 NDAA directive for the Military Health System to establish partnerships to maintain trauma care competency

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Civil Military Medicine

Transformation underway across the Military Health System

Article
1/29/2019
Thomas McCaffery, principal deputy assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, with Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director, Defense Health Agency, celebrated the Defense Health Agency's fifth anniversary on Oct. 1, 2018, by welcoming the first military hospitals and clinics transitioning to the DHA. This was first step for the MHS to emerge as a more integrated and efficient system of health and readiness. (MHS photo by Military Heath System Strategic Communications Division)

All of these changes – the Military Health System transformation, MHS GENESIS, TRICARE enhancements – are aimed at taking the DoD’s health enterprise to the next level

Recommended Content:

Access to Health Care | Health Readiness | TRICARE Health Program | MHS GENESIS | Military Hospitals and Clinics | MHS Transformation

Growing Air Force’s space medicine culture

Article
1/23/2019
Medical Airmen assigned to U.S. Air Force Space Command are charged with delivering care to the Airmen who launch, monitor and operate the Air Force’s satellite systems. As space continues to play an increasingly critical role in our nation’s defense, medical Airmen in AFSPC are also preparing for the future of space medicine. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The role of AFSPC medics to ensure space operators are medically ready to complete their mission

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

A new year marks a new you

Article
1/18/2019
Navy Reserve Sailors assigned to Navy Operational Support Center, Phoenix perform a 1.5-mile run during the physical readiness test at Luke Air Force Base in Glendale, Arizona. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Drew Verbis)

Changes in lifestyle don’t have to be drastic to be effective

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Physical Activity

CJTH continues to provide superior care for U.S., coalition forces

Article
1/7/2019
A medical team transports a patient by a stretcher to Craig Joint Theater Hospital at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Dec. 10, 2018. Before entering the hospital, patients are thoroughly assessed, administratively in-processed and checked for any explosive ordnance or weapons. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaylee Dubois)

With a 99.3-percent survival rate, the hospital staff have reason to be proud

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Northstar Dustoff provides aeromedical evacuation in Kuwait

Article
1/4/2019
Army Soldiers assigned to the 2-211th General Support Aviation Battalion, Minnesota Army National Guard, and the 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team, Mississippi Army National Guard, pull a patient from a UH-60L Black Hawk helicopter during an aeromedical evacuation rehearsal at Camp Buehring, Kuwait. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Emily Finn)

Northstar Dustoff has completed more than 60 aeromedical evacuations since August 2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

Langley surgical team goes 'purple'

Article
1/3/2019
A joint surgical team comprised of three separate branches assembled to perform an operation at U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. Consisting of a Navy surgeon, Air Force nurse and Army technician, the team performed a Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery to restore a patient’s sinus ventilation to normal function. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Samuel Eckholm)

A joint surgical team was organized to perform a functional endoscopic sinus surgery

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics
<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 
Showing results 31 - 45 Page 3 of 5

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing | Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.