Back to Top Skip to main content

World AIDS Day puts spotlight on landmark DoD study

Dr. John Mascola, director of the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center, discusses HIV vaccine progress at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Nov. 26, during a World AIDS Day commemoration.  (U.S. Army photo) Dr. John Mascola, director of the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center, discusses HIV vaccine progress at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Nov. 26, during a World AIDS Day commemoration. (U.S. Army photo)

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Research and Innovation | Global Health Engagement

The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) hosted a World AIDS Day event Tuesday, Nov. 26, highlighting advances in DoD-led HIV research and celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Army-led RV144 HIV vaccine study.

WRAIR’s Military HIV Research Program or MHRP headed the RV144 study, the first-ever – and only to-date – clinical trial to demonstrate that an HIV vaccine regimen was safe and modestly effective in preventing HIV infection. The study sought to determine what methods could be used to lower risk of contracting the disease.

The RV144 trial represented a massive undertaking for the Army and serves as a model of international and interagency collaboration. It involved more than 16,000 adult volunteers and a large network of partners who still work with WRAIR today, including the Thai Ministry of Public Health; the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases – part of the National Institutes of Health; and Sanofi Pasteur.

In 2009, the Army announced that the study’s investigational prime-boost vaccine regimen lowered the rate of HIV infection by 31.2 percent. These results, although modest, gave the global community hope that a vaccine to prevent HIV infection is possible at a time when such an achievement seemed elusive.

“RV144 was the light at the time in the field, without which we may have given up,” said Dr. John Mascola, director of the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center and the featured speaker at WRAIR’s World AIDS Day event. “In the last 10 years of HIV vaccine progress, RV144 is the anchor.”

The landmark trial continues to provide scientific direction to help guide vaccine development and testing. RV144 and its follow-on trials allowed researchers to discover of risk factors, provide targets for optimizing vaccine boosting, and form a foundation for three HIV vaccine candidates currently undergoing efficacy testing. A video featuring many prominent HIV researchers who were involved with RV144 was shown at the World AIDS Day event.

Also at the event, Lt. Gen (Ret.) Eric B. Schoomaker, 42nd surgeon general of the United States Army and former commanding general of the United States Army Medical Command, highlighted the military’s earliest contributions to HIV research, which include the development of a disease staging system and promoting the finding that HIV can be transmitted heterosexually. The military’s HIV research efforts were consolidated in 1986 with the establishment of MHRP.

MHRP’s initial mission was to advance an HIV vaccine to protect service members and the global community from HIV, but has since expanded beyond vaccine development to include cure research and prevention and treatment services in Africa under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief or PEPFAR. Via PEPFAR initiatives, WRAIR provides life-saving antiretroviral therapy to more than 350,000 people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, which contributes to global health security.

WRAIR supports PEPFAR activities within military and civilian communities in four countries where it conducts research (Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, and Kenya), which strengthens community trust and provides an ethical framework for clinical studies. The Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Program, led by the U.S. Navy, is responsible for assisting foreign military partners with the development and implementation of military-specific HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment programs in more than 55 countries around the globe, also supported by PEPFAR.

“Those countries that partner with us on PEPFAR have a 40-percent decrease in violence and a 40-increase in political stability,” said WRAIR Commander Army Col. Deydre Teyhen. “So we say that soldier health is world health. But in fighting HIV/AIDS, WRAIR researchers are also working to advance world peace.”

More information can be found on the RV144 HIV Trial web page.

You also may be interested in...

DoD, HHS implement Executive Order to modernize flu vaccines

Article
9/25/2019
Health care experts recommend that everyone 6 months and older – including the elderly, chronically ill people, and expectant mothers – receive the flu vaccine as soon as it becomes available. (DoD photo)

New task force aims to increase efficiency, effectiveness

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Immunizations

Measles Myths: Hand Washing Alone Won't Prevent Measles

Video
9/23/2019
Measles Myths: Hand Washing Alone Won't Prevent Measles

Hand washing alone will not prevent the spread of measles. Dr. Margaret Ryan, preventive medicine physician, debunks some myths about vaccinations.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health | Immunizations | Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Measles-Mumps-Rubella

U.S. builds bonds in Papua New Guinea

Article
9/17/2019
Navy Lt. Austin Stokes, (right), and Air Force Maj. Nicole Smith (center), both dentists, talk to a patient at the Pacific Angel 19-4 health outreach site in Lae, Papua New Guinea. The health outreach site is comprised of five clinics including primary care, optometry, dental, physical therapy and pharmacy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

This is the second Pacific Angel exercise conducted in Papua New Guinea

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief | Global Health Engagement

Measles Myths: Vaccines Are Safe

Video
9/17/2019
Measles Myths: Vaccines Are Safe

Vaccine components have been rigorously tested for safety. Dr. Margaret Ryan, preventive medicine physician, debunks some myths about vaccinations.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health | Immunizations | Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Measles-Mumps-Rubella

Unleashing innovation to support field medics, corpsmen

Article
9/13/2019
A drone lifts off during the Hive Final Mile demonstration on Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia. Drones are one of the autonomous technologies that might soon be helping medics provide care for warfighters on distant battlefields. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jacqueline A. Clifford)

Imagine unmanned vehicles bringing medical supplies or blood products to support a field medic’s care of wounded soldiers, or even transporting a wounded warfighter to safety. Researchers at the Army’s Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, or TATRC, are collaborating with the Services, academia and private industry to make such scenarios a reality.

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation | Innovation

Measles Myths: Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism

Video
9/12/2019
Measles Myths: Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism

Vaccines that prevent measles do not cause autism. Dr. Margaret Ryan, preventive medicine physician, debunks some myths about vaccinations.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health | Immunizations | Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Measles-Mumps-Rubella | Autism Care Demonstration

Prevent to Protect: Analia

Video
8/30/2019
Prevent to Protect: Analia

Cancer left 5-year-old Analia Pages unable to get vaccinated. Her father, Master Sgt. Edward Pages, has to take extra steps to protect her from diseases she’s susceptible to.

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Preventive Health | Immunizations

Prevent to Protect: Rosarios

Video
8/30/2019
Prevent to Protect: Rosarios

10-year-old Tatiana Rosario has a weakened immune system as a result of her cancer treatment. Growing up, she and her family made sacrifices to keep her safe from disease.

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Preventive Health | Immunizations

Prevent to Protect: Immunization Awareness

Video
8/30/2019
Prevent to Protect: Immunization Awareness

Getting vaccinated not only protects yourself and your family from deadly diseases, but it also saves the lives to those who don’t have the immune system to fend for themselves. The Military Health System shares the stories of families with children who are at risk when others aren’t immunized.

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Preventive Health | Immunizations

Prevent to Protect: Barbara and Floriann

Video
8/30/2019
Prevent to Protect: Barbara and Floriann

Barbara’s son Floriann grew up with an immune dysregulation. A Uniformed Services University pathology professor, she’s experienced first hand the importance of vaccines.

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Preventive Health | Immunizations

DHA IPM 19-006: 2019–2020 Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Program (IVP)

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Interim Procedures Memorandum (DHA-IPM), based on the authority of References (a) and (b), and in accordance with the guidance of References (c) through (o), implementing instructions, assigns responsibilities, and prescribes procedures for the seasonal influenza vaccination program. • This DHA-IPM cancels and reissues DHA-IPM 18-005. • This DHA-IPM is effective immediately and will expire 12 months from the date of issue.

Navy Medicine researchers kick off 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium with strong showing

Article
8/20/2019
Navy Medicine West Commander Rear Adm. Tim Weber (right) discusses research findings with scientists from Navy Medicine's hospitals and research labs during the first poster session at the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium. (U.S. Navy photo By Regena Kowitz)

Dozens of scientists from Navy are presenting their work

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation

Individuals, teams honored at MHSRS for exemplary research

Article
8/20/2019
Navy Vice Adm. Raquel C. Bono and Navy Rear Adm. Mary C. Riggs join individual and team award winners honored at the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium on Monday, August 19th in Kissimmee, Florida. (MHS photo)

New nurse researcher award debuts this year

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation

Research for Readiness: Military Health System kicks off annual symposium

Article
8/20/2019
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, Thomas McCaffery, welcomed attendees to the Military Health System Research Symposium on Monday, August 19th at the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Florida. (MHS photo)

Research, development ensures service members are better prepared, better protected, better cared for

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation

Day 1 at the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium

Video
8/20/2019
DHA Seal

Navy Medicine researchers from across the globe convened Aug. 19 in Kissimmee, Florida for the start of the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS) to discuss the latest scientific advances and initiatives that support warfighter health, readiness, and survivability. We had a chance to catch up with Navy Medicine leaders to get their perspectives on the impact of research to the warfighter, the Fleet, and the Fleet Marine Force.

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 61 - 75 Page 5 of 18

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.