Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Coronavirus: What providers, patients should know

Many forms of coronavirus exist among both humans and animals, but this new strain’s has caused alarm. (CDC graphic) Many forms of coronavirus exist among both humans and animals, but this new strain has caused alarm. (CDC graphic)

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Public Health | Coronavirus | Global Health Engagement | Coronavirus

With news of the contagious and potentially deadly illness known as novel coronavirus grabbing headlines worldwide, military health officials say that an informed, common sense approach minimizes the chances of getting sick.

Many forms of coronavirus exist among both humans and animals, but this new strain’s lethality has triggered considerable alarm. Believed to have originated at an animal market in Wuhan City, China, novel coronavirus has sickened hundreds and killed at least 4. It has since spread to other parts of Asia. The first case of novel coronavirus in the U.S. was reported January 22 in Washington State.

Anyone contracting a respiratory illness shouldn’t assume it’s novel coronavirus; it is far more likely to be a more common malady. “For example, right now in the U.S., influenza, with 35 million cases last season, is far more commonplace than novel coronavirus, said U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps Dr. (Lt. Cmdr.) David Shih, a preventive medicine physician and epidemiologist with the Clinical Support Division, Defense Health Agency. He added that those experiencing symptoms of respiratory illness – like coughing, sneezing, shortness of breath, and fever – should avoid contact with others and making them sick, Shih said.

“Don’t think you’re being super dedicated by showing up to work when ill,” Shih said. “Likewise, if you’re a duty supervisor, please don’t compel your workers to show up when they’re sick. In the short run, you might get a bit of a productivity boost. In the long run, that person could transmit a respiratory illness to co-workers, and pretty soon you lose way more productivity because your entire office is sick.”

Shih understands that service members stationed in areas of strategic importance and elevated states of readiness are not necessarily in the position to call in sick. In such instances, sick personnel still can take steps to practice effective cough hygiene and use whatever hygienic services they can find to avert hindering readiness by making their battle buddies sick.  Frequent thorough handwashing, for instance, is a cornerstone of respiratory disease prevention.

“You may not have plumbing for washing hands, but hand sanitizer can become your best friend and keep you healthy,” Shih said.

Regarding novel coronavirus, Shih recommends following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention travel notices.  First, avoid all non-essential travel to Wuhan, China, the outbreak’s epicenter.  Second, patients who traveled to China in the past 14 days with fever, cough, or difficulty breathing, should seek medical care right away (calling the doctor’s office or emergency room in advance to report travel and symptoms) and otherwise avoid 1) contact with others and 2) travel while sick.

CDC also has guidance for health care professionals, who should evaluate patients with fever and respiratory illness by taking a careful travel history to identify patients under investigation (PUIs), who include those with 1) fever, 2) lower respiratory illness symptoms, and 3) travel history to Wuhan, China, within 14 days prior to symptom onset. PUIs should wear a surgical mask as soon as they are identified and be evaluated in a private room with the door closed, ideally an airborne infection isolation room if available.  Workers caring for PUIs should wear gloves, gowns, masks, eye protection, and respiratory protection. Perhaps most importantly, care providers who believe they may be treating a novel coronavirus patient should immediately notify infection control and public health authorities (the installation preventive medicine or public health department at military treatment facilities).

Because novel coronavirus is new (as its name suggests), there is as yet no immunization nor specific treatment. Care providers are instead treating the symptoms – acetaminophen to reduce fever, lozenges and other treatments to soothe sore throats, and, for severe cases, ventilators to help patients breathe.

“Lacking specific treatment,” Shih said, “we must be extra vigilant about basic prevention measures: frequent handwashing, effective cough and sneeze hygiene, avoiding sick individuals, and self-isolating when sick.”

You also may be interested in...

TRICARE | COVID-19 Vaccine | Together, We Are Stronger

Video
3/15/2021
DHA Seal

In the past year, we've faced challenges, and we've done it with courage. Now, hope is on the horizon. Get vaccinated, and let's take care of each other. Together, we are stronger: www.tricare.mil/CovidVaccine

Recommended Content:

COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit

Naval Air Facility El Centro administers COVID-19 vaccine

Article
3/12/2021
Military health personnel administering the COVID-19 vaccine

Sailors and select Department of Defense civilians at Naval Air Facility EL Centro in California began receiving their COVID-19 vaccines in early March.

Recommended Content:

COVID-19 Considerations | Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit

NMRTC Bremerton nurse supports the COVID-19 vaccine effort

Article
3/12/2021
Military health personnel wearing a face mask posing for a picture

Bremerton nurse oversees several hundred beneficiaries given their initial dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts

Q&A: Are COVID-19 Vaccines Safe and Effective?

Article
3/11/2021
Military health personnel wearing a face mask and a face shield administering the COVID-19 vaccine

Military Health System provides answers to COVID-19 vaccine questions.

Recommended Content:

COVID-19 Toolkit | Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit

Get the COVID-19 vaccine you can and get it now, Fauci and Place say

Article
3/11/2021
Military personnel wearing a face mask receiving the COVID-19 vaccine

Get the COVID-19 vaccine, whichever you can, as soon as you can is the message from Dr. Fauci and DHA chief Dr. Place

Recommended Content:

COVID-19 Toolkit | Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit

New Army surveillance program designed to keep service members safe

Article
3/10/2021
Military personnel wearing a face mask hanging a light in a tree

Collecting vector samples allows for PHC-P scientists to analyze areas of interest for potential vector-borne diseases that could impact the health of the force.

Recommended Content:

Public Health | Global Health Engagement | Bug-Borne Illnesses | Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

MHS GENESIS MassVax system rolling out with COVID19 vaccines

Article
3/9/2021
Military personnel wearing face mask sitting in a line waiting for their COVID-19 vaccine

The new MHS GENESIS MassVax record-keeping tool is expediting and simplifying the process of COVID-19 vaccinations across the DOD

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | MHS GENESIS | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit | MHS GENESIS

DOD identifies more troops to help administer COVID-19 vaccine

Article
3/9/2021
Military personnel wearing a face mask filling up syringes with the COVID-19 vaccine

The DHA supports the DoD's administering COVID-19 vaccinations at community vaccination centers around the country.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit

Getting the COVID-19 Vaccine at Civilian Pharmacies

Publication
3/9/2021

YOU CAN GET THE COVID-19 VACCINE FROM ANY CIVILIAN PHARMACY AT NO CHARGE, EVEN NON-NETWORK PHARMACIES, BUT HERE ARE SOME THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND.

Recommended Content:

COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | Coronavirus

WWII soldier and his wife receive COVID-19 vaccine

Article
3/5/2021
Military personnel wearing a mask, giving the COVID-19 vaccine to a veteran wearing a mask

Beck’s arrival signals a new phase of Fort Carson’s COVID-19 vaccination efforts for TRICARE beneficiaries 75 and older.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit

Is It Your Time to Get the COVID-19 Vaccine?

Infographic
3/5/2021
This graphic informs TRICARE beneficiaries which tier they fall into as their local military treatment facility or clinic offers the vaccine.

This Infographic informs TRICARE beneficiaries which tier they fall into as their local military treatment facility or clinic offers the vaccine.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts

DoD COVID-19 Practice Management Guide Version 7

Technical Document
3/4/2021

This Practice Management Guide does not supersede DoD Policy. It is based upon the best information available at the time of publication. It is designed to provide information and assist decision making. It is not intended to define a standard of care and should not be construed as one. Neither should it be interpreted as prescribing an exclusive course of management. It was developed by experts in this field. Variations in practice will inevitably and appropriately occur when clinicians take into account the needs of individual patients, available resources, and limitations unique to an institution or type of practice. Every healthcare professional making use of this guideline is responsible for evaluating the appropriateness of applying it in the setting of any particular clinical situation. The Practice Management Guide is not intended to represent TRICARE policy. Further, inclusion of recommendations for specific testing and/or therapeutic interventions within this guide does not guarantee coverage of civilian sector care. Additional information on current TRICARE benefits may be found at www.tricare.mil or by contacting your regional TRICARE Managed Care Support Contractor.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus

Army Recruiter volunteers to administer COVID-19 vaccination

Article
3/2/2021
Military health personnel wearing a face mask giving someone the COVID-19 Vaccine

Army Master Sgt. Carolyn Lange has kept up her skills as a licensed practical nurse by administering COVID-19 vaccines on Fort George G. Meade in Maryland

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | COVID-19 Toolkit | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit | Nurses Week

Access to COVID-19 Vaccine for Members of the Selected Reserve (SELRES)

Publication
3/2/2021

Recommended Content:

COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | Coronavirus

COVID-19: DOD vaccinates more than 1 million beneficiaries worldwide

Article
3/1/2021
Military personnel wearing face mask standing in line to receive their COVID-19 Vaccine

As DOD surpasses the administration of 1 million COVID-19 vaccine shots in arms, leaders reflect on how each military treatment facility community made the success possible, despite challenges.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | COVID-19 Toolkit | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 61 - 75 Page 5 of 57

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.