Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

MHS Raises Awareness of Heart Health on National Wear Red Day

National Wear Red Day helps raise awareness of heart disease, heart attacks, and strokes. Join us for National Wear Red Day, Friday, Feb. 7. Wear red, snap a photo with your family and friends, and share it on social media using the hashtag #WearRedDay. (MHS photo) National Wear Red Day helps raise awareness of heart disease, heart attacks, and strokes. Join us for National Wear Red Day, Friday, Feb. 7. Wear red, snap a photo with your family and friends, and share it on social media using the hashtag #WearRedDay. (MHS photo)

Recommended Content:

Heart Health

What’s a great way to raise awareness of heart disease across the Department of Defense community? Join us for National Wear Red Day, Friday, Feb. 7. Wear red, snap a photo with your family and friends, and share it on social media using the hashtag #WearRedDay.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Heart disease and stroke cause more than 20 percent of deaths among women each year. A woman dies of cardiovascular disease approximately every 80 seconds. But there is hope – diseases of the heart can be prevented.

The CDC recommends four basic steps for reducing your risk of cardiovascular disease, which could cause heart attack, stroke, or other illness.

  • Eat healthy – Think about what you eat. Make smart choices, with fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, skinless poultry and fish, and nuts and legumes. Also, limit saturated fats, sodium, red meat, and sugar-sweetened beverages.
  • Manage blood pressure – Nearly half of American adults have high blood pressure.While hereditary factors contribute to your risk of hypertension, a healthy lifestyle also contributes to increased risk of heart attack, stroke, or other illnesses.
  • Move more – For adults, the U.S. Surgeon General recommends two-and-a-half hours of moderate-intensity exercise each week; children should get about an hour per day.
  • Don’t smoke – Smoking greatly increases your risk of cardiovascular disease. If you do smoke, you can lower your risk by reducing smoking or quitting.

According to the CDC, heart attack symptoms differ between men and women ­ but all warning signs should be treated as if your life depends on it.

Possible Heart Attack Symptoms

If you have any of these signs of a heart attack, call 911 and get to a hospital right away:

  • Uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain in the center of your chest. It lasts more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back.
  • Pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
  • Other signs such as breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.

The most common heart attack symptom in women, as with men, is chest pain or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, and back or jaw pain.

Possible Stroke Symptoms

If you have any of these stroke symptoms, call 911 and get to a hospital right away.

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body.
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding.
  • Sudden trouble seeing or blurred vision in one or both eyes.
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination.
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause.

Throughout February, Health.mil will feature articles that can help you achieve Total Force Fitness and decrease your risk of cardiovascular disease.

You also may be interested in...

Six Immediate Health Benefits You Will See If You Lose a Little Weight

Article
1/14/2022
A soldier assigned to the 256th Combat Support Hospital, Twinsburg, Ohio, drinks water from a gallon-sized jug during Combat Support Training Exercise 18-03 at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, March 26, 2018. The 256th CSH implemented a goal setting competition, dubbed Dandy Camp, to teach and encourage soldiers to monitor their total carbohydrate intake during the field exercise. The overall goal of Dandy Camp is to educate soldiers about healthy eating choices and encourage soldiers to set and meet goals for themselves.

Losing even a little weight now can have a major impact on your health and quality of life. This long list of benefits might help motivate you to adjust your habits to achieve a happier, healthier lifestyle.

Recommended Content:

Physical Fitness | Women's Health | Heart Health | Nutritional Fitness | Psychological Fitness | Sleep

Aphasia, Caused by Stroke or TBI, is Frustrating and Little Known

Article
6/29/2021
A doctor looking at brain scans

Aphasia is an incurable disease usually caused by stroke that affects all forms of communication.

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness | Heart Health | Centers of Excellence | Traumatic Brain Injury

Cardiovascular providers counter pandemic-induced sedentary lifestyle

Article
2/26/2021
Military health personnel sticking an IV in a patient's arm

COVID-19 fears likely affecting cardiovascular care but not at military medical treatment facilities.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Heart Health | Medical and Dental Preventive Care Fitness | Heart Health Toolkit | Heart Health Toolkit

10 ways to support holistic heart health

Article
2/26/2021
picture of a heart running on the treadmill with the words "healthy heart for body and soul. ten ways to support holistic heart health"

Tips for a Total Force Fitness approach to keeping your heart healthy

Recommended Content:

Heart Health | Medical and Dental Preventive Care Fitness | Total Force Fitness | Heart Health Toolkit | Heart Health Toolkit

Proper diet, sleep, exercise, and joy key to heart health

Article
2/24/2021
Military personnel working out at the gym

Heart health is crucial to service members’ readiness throughout their high-stress careers. Working to achieve that takes self-discipline and moderation, but also joy, integrity, and social interaction

Recommended Content:

Heart Health | Medical and Dental Preventive Care Fitness | Total Force Fitness | Heart Health Toolkit | Heart Health Toolkit | Heart Health Toolkit

How do you mend a broken heart? It usually fixes itself

Article
2/23/2021
Military personnel wearing a face mask, gets his heart checked out by military heath personnel

'Broken Heart Syndrome’ and ‘Holiday Heart Syndrome’ are very real phenomena. Spiritual and social fitness can help mitigate both.

Recommended Content:

Heart Health | Total Force Fitness | Heart Health Toolkit | Heart Health Toolkit

Training for a healthy heart can improve overall health

Article
2/22/2021
Military personnel wearing a mask exercising in the gym

Service members must be heart healthy to perform optimally throughout their military careers.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Physical Fitness | Medical and Dental Preventive Care Fitness | Total Force Fitness | Heart Health

WRNMMC nurses recognized for work with Virtual Cardiac Rehab

Article
2/19/2021
Two military personnel wearing face mask standing on gym equipment

WRNMMC’s Cardiac Rehab Center continues to care for patients during ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Recommended Content:

Heart Health | Medical and Dental Preventive Care Fitness | Nursing in the Military Health System

Ask the Doc: Trying to Be Heart Smart

Article
2/15/2021
Snow covers the trees around J. Edward Roush Lake, Huntington, Ind.

Dear Doc: I can’t speak for everyone, but I know where I live, we’ve still got a month or so of extreme cold weather left. Following the advice from your last column, I’m pushing through with my outdoor workouts. While I am staying warm, I’ve noticed that I get tired quicker than I would when it’s warm outside. I’ve also heard that your heart must work harder when you’re working out outside during the winter. How can I make sure I’m not risking my heart health to keep up my routine? –-Trying to be Heart Smart

Recommended Content:

Winter Safety | Heart Health | Ask The Doc

Milley Highlights Importance of Heart Health during visit to WRNMMC

Article
2/12/2021
Two military personnel, wearing masks, standing with woman in red dress, also wearing a  mask

Americans recognize the first Friday in February as National Wear Red Day.

Recommended Content:

Heart Health Toolkit | Heart Health Toolkit | Heart Health

COVID-19 presents challenges to heart health, physical fitness

Article
2/1/2021
Four military personnel, wearing masks, running on a track

Because of COVID-19 shutdowns, the overall health of both military personnel and beneficiaries has taken a hit over the last year.

Recommended Content:

Heart Health Toolkit | Heart Health Toolkit | Heart Health Toolkit | Coronavirus | Total Force Fitness | Physical Fitness | Heart Health

Experts dish out 9 tips for heart health

Article
2/28/2020
Naturally occurring phytochemicals in plants provide color, aroma, and flavor to fruits and vegetables. Different colors provide different nutrients, so eating a range of colors is essential for heart health. (U.S. Air Force illustration by Airman 1st Class Jennifer Gonzales)

Earlier this month, the MHS showed why heart health is important; Here is how you look out for yours

Recommended Content:

Heart Health | Total Force Fitness

Listen to your Heart in February with Total Force Fitness

Article
2/6/2020
Navy Lt. Karl Yves Marie Grand Pierre, a physician assistant at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay, Georgia, checks Seaman Ashley Jackett’s heart. DoD recommends that all service members and beneficiaries do just that: listen to your heart and build healthy heart habits. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel, Naval Hospital Jacksonville)

Heart health is key to a medically ready military force; the Military Health System looks at this subject through the Total Force Fitness framework

Recommended Content:

Heart Health
Showing results 1 - 13 Page 1 of 1

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.