Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Be Cyber Vigilant and Avoid COVID-19 Scammers

Soldier sitting in front of two computer monitors Protect yourself online when using your mobile devices and personal computers. (Photo by Tech. Sgt. Mark Thompson)

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Cybersecurity Awareness

The COVID-19 pandemic has opened the door for a new cycle of cybersecurity scams. While nearly everyone concentrates on protecting their health, it’s also important for us to protect our personal identity and financial information.

“Not too long ago, cybersecurity was considered someone else’s problem that could be solved with more technology. But it’s not a technological problem;­ it’s a knowledge problem and people need to take personal responsibility for closing that knowledge gap to make healthy choices,” Servio Medina, chief, Cybersecurity Oversight, Governance & Strategy Branch at Defense Health Agency, said.

We have certainly become even more dependent on the internet since we’ve been social distancing and teleworking. Now more than ever, it’s essential for everyone to practice healthy cyber hygiene, and be more aware of online fraudulent activities, explained Medina.

According to U.S. Cyber Command, scammers have increased the frequency and sophistication of tactics to take your money and steal your identity. Being aware of their techniques can help you not to fall victim.

“People can unwittingly compromise their own well-being, for example through an improper diet or even sitting at a desk all day. The same is true for your cyber well-being when you are online,” Medina added. “An innocent click of a hyperlink and you could compromise your own personal information without realizing it.” Part of the Military Health System’s role in taking care of families is helping them understand how to protect their online presence, he said.

Specifically, a number of malicious COVID-19 related cyber activities have been detected that people need to be aware of so they can guard against becoming a victim.

For example, cyber criminals are posing as legitimate health organizations promoting COVID-19 test kits and requesting donations for charitable organizations. Some are establishing websites and email addresses to sell phony products and useless treatments to cure COVID-19. They’re also claiming they have supplies of high-demand products, such as face masks and disinfectants in stock and for sale. Protection Tip: If you’re tempted by these offers, check online reviews of companies offering COVID-19 products or supplies and confirm they are legitimate before you give them any personal or financial information. Stay away from companies with negative reviews and complaints about not receiving products ordered.

Beneficiaries should also be wary of scam emails from email addresses purporting to be affiliated with TRICARE or a government authority. TRICARE will never request personal information via email. In addition, beneficiaries should trust information only from a .mil or .gov domain, with some exceptions, such as websites for our managed care support contractors, Health Net Federal Services and Humana Military.

Scammers are also creating and manipulating mobile apps designed to track the spread of COVID-19. These apps insert malware that will compromise users’ devices and personal information. Be careful to research any app, to include reviews and author, before you download it.

“Cyber hackers and scammers are always looking for a vulnerability to exploit; a health crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic gives more opportunities to prey on our vulnerabilities. We need to protect ourselves online through healthy cyber practices just as you maintain healthy personal hygiene all the time,” Medina added. “Remember: it only takes one click.”

For more information, visit the MHS Cybersecurity Awareness webpage. To learn more about military health benefits fraud, visit the Program Integrity Office webpage. To file a claim involving a cyber scam related to COVID-19, visit the Federal Trade Commission website.

You also may be interested in...

DoD ready to help with Coronavirus, but capability limited

Article
3/17/2020
Misook Choe, a laboratory manager with the Emerging Infectious Disease branch at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Silver Spring, Md., runs a test during research into a solution for the new coronavirus, COVID-19, March 3, 2020. The Emerging Infectious Diseases branch, established in 2018, has the explicit mission to survey, anticipate and counter the mounting threat of emerging infectious diseases of key importance to U.S. forces in the homeland and abroad. (U.S. Army Sgt. Michael Walters)

The DoD has only about 2% to 3% of the number of hospital beds that the private sector has

Recommended Content:

Combat Support | Public Health | Coronavirus | Coronavirus

How DHA monitors the spread of health outbreaks

Article
3/13/2020
The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) is the central epidemiologic resource for the U.S. Armed Forces, conducting medical surveillance to protect those who serve our nation in uniform and allies who are critical to our national security interests. AFHSB provides timely, relevant, actionable and comprehensive health surveillance information to promote, maintain, and enhance the health of military and military-associated populations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Nathan Lipscomb)

The Defense Health Agency works as a combat support agency to the military services and Military Health System

Recommended Content:

Combat Support | Public Health | Coronavirus | Coronavirus

DoD issues flexible instructions on response to Coronavirus

Article
3/13/2020
This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reveals ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses. The illness caused by this virus has been named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). (CDC Illustration)

The memo covers aspects from before the outbreak through all levels of infection

Recommended Content:

Combat Support | Public Health | Coronavirus | Coronavirus

Terry M. Rauch, Ph.D., M.P.H., M.B.A. Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Force Health Protection and Readiness Regarding U.S. Biodefense and Response to the Novel Coronavirus Outbreak [Testified] Before the House Committee on Oversight and Reform

Congressional Testimony
3/11/2020

Recommended Content:

COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit | Coronavirus

COVID-19: Know what the terms mean

Article
3/10/2020
Soldiers stationed on U.S. Army Garrison Casey conduct pre-screening processes on individuals awaiting entry to the base, USAG-Casey, Dongducheon, Republic of Korea, Feb. 26, 2020. Additional screening measures of a verbal questionnaire and temperature check are in response to the heighted awareness of Coronavirus (COVID-19) following a surge in cases throughout the Republic of Korea and are meant to help control the spread of COVID-19 and to protect the force. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Amber I. Smith)

Learning the language can help you stay safe

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Public Health | Combat Support | Coronavirus

Coronavirus: What you need to know

Article
3/6/2020
A Guardsmen with the 341st Military Intelligence Battalion conducts translation work on a safety message regarding the best practices for avoiding the novel coronavirus for the Washington Department of Health on Feb. 9, 2020 at the Information Operations Readiness Center, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. (Courtesy Photo)

Although news stories and images contain many reports of people wearing surgical masks to ward off the virus, that's not recommended

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Public Health | Coronavirus | Coronavirus

DoD makes plans to combat Coronavirus

Article
3/4/2020
Defense Secretary Dr. Mark T. Esper and Army Gen. Mark A. Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, speak to reporters at the Pentagon, March 2, 2020. (DoD photo Lisa Ferdinando)

The number one priority remains to protect our forces and their families

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Public Health | Combat Support | Coronavirus

MHS prepared to support interagency coronavirus response

Article
2/6/2020
Airmen assist one another in donning their personal protective equipment, while on-board an Air Force C-17 Globemaster III during transportation isolation system training at Joint Base Charleston, South Carolina. Engineered and implemented after the Ebola virus outbreak in 2014, the TIS is an enclosure the Department of Defense can use to safely transport patients with diseases like novel coronavirus. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)

From R&D to force health protection, MHS protects DoD personnel and families

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Public Health | Coronavirus | Coronavirus

DoD releases guidance to protect forces from novel coronavirus

Article
1/31/2020
The novel coronavirus is a variant of other coronaviruses, such as this colorized transmission electron micrograph of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) virus particles (blue) found near the periphery of an infected VERO E6 cell (yellow). Image captured and color-enhanced at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility in Fort Detrick, Maryland. (Photo by NIAID)

Basic infection controls offer best defense against illness

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Public Health | Coronavirus | Coronavirus

Coronavirus: What providers, patients should know

Article
1/24/2020
Many forms of coronavirus exist among both humans and animals, but this new strain’s has caused alarm. (CDC graphic)

What to do now that virus has appeared in U.S.

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Public Health | Coronavirus | Coronavirus

Creating a Secure Medical Device

Infographic
4/17/2017
This cyberfit recipe for success encourages you to take steps to make sure you're medical devices are kept secure to avoid possible side effects: health care fraud, identity theft or interference with the functionality of your device.

Follow this cyberfit recipe for success for creating a secure medical device.

Recommended Content:

Cybersecurity Awareness

5-Day Cyberfit Plan: Day 5

Infographic
10/4/2016
5-Day Cyberfit Plan, Day 5

Beware of Health Information Fraud

Recommended Content:

Cybersecurity Awareness

5-Day Cyberfit Plan: Day 1

Infographic
10/4/2016
5-Day Cyberfit Plan, Day 1

Password Protect Your Devices

Recommended Content:

Cybersecurity Awareness

5-Day Cyberfit Plan: Day 3

Infographic
10/4/2016
5-Day Cyberfit Plan, Day 3

Protect Your Stored Information

Recommended Content:

Cybersecurity Awareness

5-Day Cyberfit Plan: Day 2

Infographic
10/4/2016
5-Day Cyberfit Plan, Day 2

Clean Out Your Mobile Apps

Recommended Content:

Cybersecurity Awareness
<< < ... 31 32 33 34 35  ... > >> 
Showing results 511 - 525 Page 35 of 36

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.