Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Army entomologist searches for diseases in Africa

Soldier wearing gloves testing various substances Army Maj. Jareè Lenore Johnson, entomology chief at the U.S. Army Medical Research Directorate-Africa, conducts surveillance and resistance testing.

Recommended Content:

Bug-Borne Illnesses | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division

Army Maj. Jareè Lenore Johnson, Entomology Chief, U.S. Army Medical Research Directorate-Africa, is a board-certified entomologist with the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR). She is currently stationed in Kisumu, Kenya and studies insects and pests in order to monitor their behavior and patterns to prevent diseases among the military population.

What vector-borne projects are you working on?

Insecticide resistance, arthropod vectors and their diseases, insecticidal product/spatial testing, and tracking vertebrate ectoparasites and their associated diseases

Teacher in front of class
Army Maj. Jareè Lenore Johnson, entomology chief at the U.S. Army Medical Research Directorate-Africa, speaks with students at the International School in Kenya on harmful and beneficial arthropods. 

What led you to this career?

I was fascinated by critters (animals and insects) at a young age. In college, I started out in animal science because I wanted to be a veterinarian, but fell in love with entomology after accepting a research fellowship to work with ticks/Lyme disease in dogs and humans. Around this time, West Nile Virus entered the East Coast and I had the opportunity to conduct mosquito surveillance for the first time—it was fun! I have two master’s degrees in Animal Health and Diseases and Medical Entomology.

What do you enjoy most about entomology in the U.S. military?

The ability to work with various medically important arthropods and vertebrate pest. The military has given me the opportunity to travel and surround myself with various cultures. There are always new scientific discoveries and I am constantly reading scientific literature to ensure that I am up-to-date on the latest news in medical-veterinary entomology. I am constantly challenged to learn what I don’t know, and that has made me successful in my craft.

Have you contributed to any interesting projects?

I was selected to stand up the Army Public Health Center's first insecticidal resistance program. This grassroots project allowed my soldiers to work on local entomology issues that were not conducted on other installations or Army PM field. This work was rewarding because I was able to teach others and bring a much needed capability to the organization.

You also may be interested in...

Global Influenza Summary: December 31, 2017

Report
12/31/2017

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division | AFHSD Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

Global Influenza Summary: December 24, 2017

Report
12/24/2017

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division | AFHSD Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

Global Influenza Summary: December 10, 2017

Report
12/10/2017

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division | AFHSD Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

AFHSB's health surveillance program supports Defense Department global health engagement efforts

Article
11/30/2017
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Douglass, left, an aerospace medical technician, watches as Liberian health care workers properly put on their personal protective equipment as part response by the Defense Department operation to provide logistics, training and engineering support during the Ebola virus outbreak. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Terrance D. Rhodes)

Navy Commander Franca R. Jones, chief of the Global Emerging Infections section at the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) discusses how AFHSB's health surveillance program supports the Defense Department global health engagement efforts.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division | Global Emerging Infections Surveillance | Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Surveillance | Febrile and Vector-Borne Infections (FVBI) Surveillance | Enteric Infections (EI) Surveillance | GEIS Partners | Global Health Engagement

Global Influenza Summary: November 19, 2017

Report
11/19/2017

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division | AFHSD Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

Five cold seasons: July 2012 – June 2017, Cold injuries during deployments

Infographic
11/3/2017
During the 5-year surveillance period, 105 cold injuries were diagnosed and treated in service members deployed outside of the U.S. Of these 105 cold injuries, 68% occurred in the first two cold seasons. Total no. of cold injuries, by season: •	35 cold injuries during cold season 2012 – 2013 •	36 during 2013 – 2014 •	13 during 2014 – 2015 •	11 during 2015 – 2016 •	10 during 2016 – 2017 The decrease in the number of cases is most likely a byproduct of: •	The dramatic decline in the number of service members deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan •	Changes in the nature of military operations there Access the full report in MSMR Vol. 24 No. 10 October 2017 at Health.mil/MSMR Pie Chart showing cold injuries during deployments: •	39 Immersion •	33 Frostbite •	17 unspecified  •	16 Hypothermia Background image shows service member walking in the snow.

This infographic documents cold injuries during deployments outside of the United States for the July 2012 – June 2017 cold seasons (five-year surveillance period).

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division | Winter Safety

Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella: Among service members and other beneficiaries of the Military Health System, 2010 – 2016

Infographic
11/3/2017
Measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (MMR/V) are highly communicable infectious diseases whose causative agents are spread through contact with contaminated surfaces or airborne droplets. MMR/V were common in the U.S. before the introduction of licensed vaccines: measles (1963), mumps (1967), rubella (1969), and varicella (1995). Since then, these vaccines have been important components of routine pediatric preventive care. This report highlights the recent trends in MMR/V in both military and civilian populations as well as the importance of primary and booster vaccinations.  During 2010 – 2016, there were: •	11 confirmed measles cases – one was in a service member. •	76 confirmed mumps cases – 28 were in service members. •	7 confirmed rubella cases – two were in service members. •	62 confirmed varicella cases among service members. The reporting of cases of varicella in non-military personnel was not mandated until 2017. Individuals at highest risk for MMR/V •	Infants •	Unvaccinated persons •	Inadequately vaccinated persons •	Individuals living in communities with low vaccination rates •	Persons living in crowded and unsanitary conditions •	Those with compromised immune systems Access the full report in MSMR Vol. 24 No. 10 October 2017 for more information at Health.mil/MSMR A picture of service members in communal area displays as well as an image of team work activities.

This infographic highlights the recent trends in Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella (MMR/V) in both military and civilian populations as well as the importance of primary and booster vaccinations.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division | Measles-Mumps-Rubella

Surveillance Snapshot: Influenza Immunization among U.S. Armed Forces Healthcare Workers, August 2012 – April 2017

Infographic
10/31/2017
Did you know …?  During the 2016 – 2017 influenza season, each of the three services attained greater than 94% compliance among healthcare personnel. The U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends that all healthcare personnel be vaccinated against influenza to protect themselves and their patients. The Joint Commission requires that healthcare organizations have influenza vaccination programs for practitioners and staff, and that they work toward the goal of 90 percent receipt of influenza vaccine. This snapshot of a five-year surveillance period (August 2012 – April 2017) shows  that the active component healthcare personnel of the Army, Navy, and Air Force has exceeded the percentage compliance with influenza immunization requirement in each year. •	Line graph showing the percentage of healthcare specialists and officers with records of influenza vacation by influenza year (1 August through 30 April) and service, active, U.S. Armed Forces, August 2012 – April 2017 displays. Access the full snapshot in MSMR Vol. 24 No. 10 October 2017 at Health.mil/MSMR There are two photos featured on the infographic: 1.	A service member being vaccinated with the flu vaccine displays  2.	A photo of vaccine administrators shows.

This snapshot of a five-year surveillance period (August 2012 – April 2017) details influenza immunization compliance among the active component healthcare personnel of the Army, Navy, and Air Force.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division

Global Influenza Summary: October 29, 2017

Report
10/29/2017

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division | AFHSD Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

Global Influenza Summary: October 8, 2017

Report
10/8/2017

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division | AFHSD Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

Global Influenza Summary: October 1, 2017

Report
10/1/2017

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division | AFHSD Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

Challenges with diagnosing and investigating suspected active Tuberculosis disease in military trainees

Infographic
9/14/2017
The incidence rates of active tuberculosis (TB) disease in the general U.S. population and the U.S. military have declined over the past two decades, with foreign birth remaining one of the strongest correlates of risk. Recently, there have been several atypical and asymptomatic presentations of active and suspected TB cases among the population of trainees at Joint base San Antonio – Lackland, TX. Between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2016, a total of 14 U.S. and international military personnel in training at JBSA – Lackland were hospitalized for suspected pulmonary TB. The variety of atypical presentations and their resulting diagnostic and public health challenges promoted this retrospective review of all hospitalized cases. This case series raises concerns about the increasing reliance on molecular tests for rapid diagnosis of active TB, especially in patients with minimal to no pulmonary symptoms. Findings •	The incidence rate in the training population was 1.89 per 100,000 population •	5 of 14 U.S. and international military personnel were diagnosed with active TB disease •	All were male, aged 19 – 29 years •	Only one TB case had pulmonary symptoms, but these were not suggestive of TB •	8 of 14 trainees were asymptomatic at the time of hospital admission, and tuberculin skin test and interferon gamma release assay results were highly variable Chart displays with descriptions and diagnoses of trainees hospitalized for suspected active tuberculosis, Joint Base San Antonio  – Lackland, TX, 2010 – 2016 (N=14). Access the report in MSMR Vol. 24 No. 8 August 2017 at Health.mil/MSMR  Images featured on infographic: •	Human lungs •	Image of TB

The incidence rates of active tuberculosis (TB) disease in the general U.S. population and the U.S. military have declined over the past two decades, with foreign birth remaining one of the strongest correlates of risk. This infographic documents findings from several atypical and asymptomatic presentations of active and suspected TB cases among the population of trainees at Joint Base San Antonio – Lackland, TX between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2016.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division

Multiple Sclerosis among service members of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Armed Forces and among other beneficiaries of the Military Health System, 2007 – 2016

Infographic
9/14/2017
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, affecting approximately 400,000 people in the U.S. and more than two million people worldwide. The inflammatory demyelination and axonal injury that characterize MS result in significant clinical disability and economic burden. This study makes a useful contribution to the literature on temporal changes in the incidence of MS by sex and race/ ethnicity. A map of the U.S. displays to show a visual about the 400,000 people affected by MS in the country. An image of Earth displays to show a visual about the more than 2 million people worldwide affected by MS. FINDINGS •	Between 2007 and 2016, a total of 2,031 active component service members received incident diagnoses of MS •	The overall unadjusted incidence rate was 14.9 cases per 100,000 p-yrs •	During the surveillance period, unadjusted annual incidence rates of MS decreased by 25.4% •	The highest overall incidence rates were observed among service members diagnosed after age 30 with rates peaking among those aged 40 years or older. First line graph shows:  annual incidence rates of MS were higher among female service members than male service members and decreased by 42.2% during the 10-year period.  Second line graph shows:  The higher overall incidence of MS among non-Hispanic blacks was found among females, and to a lesser degree among males. Median age at MS case-defining diagnosis •	Age 32 years among active component members •	Age 37 years among reserve / guard members •	Age 48 years among non-service member beneficiaries  Common MS Symptoms •	Numbness •	Tingling in limbs •	Visual Loss •	Double Vision •	Mother Weakness •	Gait Disturbance Images showings these symptoms display. Access the full report in MSMR Vol. 24 No. 3 August 2017 at Health.mil/MSMR

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, affecting approximately 400,000 people in the U.S. and more than two million people worldwide. This infographic documents data on the temporal changes in the incidence of MS by sex and race/ ethnicity.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division

Global Influenza Summary: September 3, 2017

Report
9/3/2017

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division | AFHSD Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

Mid-season influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates for the 2016 – 2017 influenza season

Infographic
8/28/2017
The Department of Defense (DoD) conducts year-round influenza surveillance for military healthcare beneficiaries and select civilian populations. Data from routine respiratory surveillance are used to estimate mid-season influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) and these findings are shared at the Food and Drug Administration’s advisory committee meeting on U.S. influenza vaccine strain selection. DoD VE estimates from the Defense Health Agency’s Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) and Naval Health Research Center (NHRC) are presented in this report. Findings •	For all influenza types: VE was 42% as found by AFHSB-Air Force Satellite Cell, similar to NHRC’s overall VE of 45% •	Influenza A (H3N2) VE was 42% by AFHSB-AF estimation and VE was 46% as estimated by NHRC •	VE for Influenza B was slightly higher at 53% as estimated by AFHSB-AF •	AFHSB analysis found that VE against influenza A was 3% and VE against influenza A (H3N2) was 33% Table showing the mid-season influenza effectiveness estimates, 2016 –2017 displays. The mid-season influenza VE estimates indicated that vaccination reduced the odds of medically attended influenza infection by approximately 45% among DoD dependents and civilians. Access the full report in MSMR Vol. 24 No. 8 August 2017 at Health.mil/MSMR  Three photos display on this infographic: 1.	An elderly woman receiving a flu show from a female service member 2.	Female service member receives a flu shot 3.	Male physician hold a flu shot

This infographic documents Department of Defense mid-season influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates from the Defense Health Agency’s Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch and Naval Health Research Center for the 2016 – 2017 influenza season.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division | Influenza Summary and Reports
<< < ... 6 7 8 9 10  ... > >> 
Showing results 106 - 120 Page 8 of 13

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.