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Navy entomologist conducts vector surveillance throughout Asia

Soldier crouching down outside looking at the ground Navy Lt. Jodi M. Fiorenzano, and entomologist, conducts Dengue Vector Threat assessments at SEABEE worksites in East Timor.

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Navy Lt. Jodi Fiorenzano is a Navy entomologist stationed in Sembawang, Singapore where her team conducts vector surveillance throughout the Pacific to better understand regional diseases and help to prevent diseases outbreaks in the military population.

What vector-borne (mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas) projects are you working on?

My team and I conduct vector surveillance throughout the Pacific to better understand regional diseases, host and vector relations, and vector behaviors. In Cambodia, my team researches Dengue vectors and surveillance techniques in urban environments. We also research ectoparasites (fleas, lice, ticks, mites) and their diseases, along with sand flies and their related pathogens. In Laos and Mongolia, we conduct ectoparasites surveillance and study mosquito behaviors where both Malaria and Dengue reside in Vietnam. 

What do you enjoy most about entomology in the U.S. military?

I’ve met amazing entomologists from all the military services and worked alongside many partner nation and civilian entomologists and technicians. 

What are some of your most interesting projects? 

During my six years as a Navy Entomologist I was stationed in Hawaii and Singapore. I’ve taught integrated vector management techniques to multiple hospital corpsmen and participated in a vector management training program in Fiji, with the World Health Organization. I also helped plan Global Health Engagements with the Pacific Partnership in Sri Lanka, Malaysia and conducted Dengue Vector Threat assessments in Chuuk (one of four states in the Federated States of Micronesia), and East Timor to mitigate dengue risks to Navy construction teams. Most recently, I conducted regional surveillance throughout the Pacific to study multiple vectors (mosquitoes, ectoparasites, and sand flies) to understand vectors and their pathogens and add to the growing entomological knowledge across the DoD. 

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