Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Defending the Homeland: BACH Civilian earns RHC-A Civilian of the Year

Soldier and woman standing by two flags, crossed. Blanchfield Army Community Hospital Commander, Army Col. Patrick Birchfield gave praise to Willie Mae Guidry during an outdoor award ceremony recognizing her selection as Regional Health Command Atlantic Fiscal Year 2019 Civilian of the Year, Category 1. (Courtesy Photo)

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Health Readiness | Combat Support | Heroes Behind the Mask

On June 23, Willie Mae Guidry, a Department of the Army civilian from Blanchfield Army Community Hospital at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, was recognized as the 2019 Regional Health Command-Atlantic’s Civilian of the Year. 

BACH Commander Army Col. (Dr.) Patrick Birchfield presented Guidry with the Army Civilian Service Medal signed by Army Maj. Gen. (Dr.) Michael Place, Regional Health Command Atlantic commander. 

Guidry serves as a supply technician in the hospital’s property book office helping to manage over $90 million in government property needed to operate the hospital, pharmacies and, outlying clinics. 

“I’m grateful for the recognition I received for my work because I’m very sure that every other nominee for this award was as capable if not more for winning this award,” said Guidry, who began her career in federal service in 1992 and has worked at BACH since 2015. 

“I have faced several challenges on my way here, but each one of them has only strengthened me, to make me the person I am today – a thorough professional who knows exactly what she wants. Someone who sets her eyes on a goal and does not lose sight of it,” she said, also thanking and recognizing her department and family for their support, encouragement, and inspiration. 

Birchfield said Guidry has earned an outstanding reputation throughout BACH, Army Medicine and the Medical Logistics community, and will advance to the U.S. Army’s Medical Command (MEDCOM) Civilian of the Year competition later this year.

“This regional award encompasses Category 1 civilians at Army Medicine facilities across the entire Eastern United States. It makes me incredibly proud that you have chosen to work here,” Birchfield told Guidry. “Miss Guidry is amazing and is the face of the phenomenal medical logistics team that got her here. Thanks to Miss Guidry and the team, there has been a lot of savings of time, savings of money, and increased readiness rates that make not only your department look good but our entire organization.” 

Guidry continues to serve as the subject matter expert on procurement, management, and disposition of medical devices and durable property for BACH. 

While she has worked in Army Medicine facilities her entire career, this year has been unlike any other. She and her team had to rapidly adapt to support the hospital’s medical logistics and procurement requirements in response to the national emergency resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“Ordering [supplies] played a large role in our COVID-19 mission. I’ve ordered more supplies than I have ever ordered in my supply career,” explained Guidry, who continues to focus on keeping the hospital a ready military treatment facility, procuring needed medical supplies and equipment. 

Guidry noted how proud she is to serve at BACH during the pandemic and noted that it is personal for her. In March, she lost her mother to the COVID-19 disease. 

“I’m always willing to help where help is needed,” said Guidry. 

You also may be interested in...

Cold Weather Injuries

Infographic
11/20/2018
Cold Weather Injuries

This update summarizes the frequencies, incidence rates, and correlates of risk of cold injuries among members of both active and reserve components of the U.S. Armed Forces during the past 5 years.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Malaria

Infographic
11/20/2018
Malaria

This report describes a cluster of 11 soldiers with vivax malaria among U.S. military personnel who trained at Dagmar North training area, near the demilitarized zone (DMZ), in the Republic of Korea (ROK) in 2015.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

DoD Flu VE

Infographic
10/26/2018
DoD Flu VE

Each season, several entities within the(DoD) perform surveillance for influenza among beneficiaries and utilize these data to perform VE analyses to estimate how well the seasonal vaccine protects against medically-attended influenza.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health | Influenza Summary and Reports

Psychiatric Medical Evaluations

Infographic
10/26/2018
Psychiatric Medical Evaluations

This study evaluated incidence of pre-deployment family problem diagnoses and psychiatric medical evacuations among a population of active component service members without a history of previous mental health diagnoses, who deployed to the U.S. Central Command Area of Responsibility for the first time between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2014.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

Infographic
10/26/2018
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

The purpose of this study was to update previous MSMR analyses of the incidence of acute Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) among U.S. active component women using a 21-year surveillance period from 1996 through 2016. A secondary objective was to report on the proportion of service women with previously diagnosed PID who were subsequently diagnosed with infertility or ectopic pregnancy.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Gynecologic Disorders

Infographic
10/3/2018
Gynecologic disorders are conditions that affect the female reproductive organs, including the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, vagina, and vulva. As part of Women’s Health Month, this report describes the incidence and burden of four commonly occur-ring gynecologic disorders (menorrhagia, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), uterine fibroids, and endometriosis) among active component service women from 2012 through 2016. This report also documents the number and percentage of women with co-occurring incident diagnoses during the surveillance period.

Gynecologic disorders are conditions that affect the female reproductive organs, including the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, vagina, and vulva. As part of Women’s Health Month, this report describes the incidence and burden of four commonly occur-ring gynecologic disorders (menorrhagia, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), uterine fibroids, and endometriosis) among active component service women from 2012 through 2016. This report also documents the number and percentage of women with co-occurring incident diagnoses during the surveillance period.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

CVD

Infographic
10/3/2018
CVD

As of part of WOMEN’S HEALTH MONTH, we focus on the findings related to female service members. If the risk factors are recognized, these service members can take steps to modify their lifestyles or obtain appropriate medical intervention, and reduce the likelihood of significant CVD while serving in the Armed Forces, and also after leaving service.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

HPV

Infographic
10/3/2018
HPV

Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the U.S.; HPV is the second most frequently diagnosed STI in U.S. military service members. Currently, HPV vaccine is not mandatory for U.S. military service members, but the Defense Health Agency and each individual service have policies encouraging and offering HPV vaccination to service members. As part of women's health month, we examine initiation, coverage and completion rates of HPV vaccine among female service members.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

HPV

Infographic
9/24/2018
HPV

Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the U.S., and is the second most frequently diagnosed STI in U.S. military service members. Currently, HPV is not a mandatory vaccine for U.S. military service. However, it is encouraged and offered to service members.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Drowning

Infographic
9/24/2018
Drowning

Service members are at risk for unintentional drownings during training, occupational activities, and off-duty recreation. In the U.S., unintentional drowning ranks as the fifth leading cause of unintentional injury death and accounted for an average of 3,558 deaths (non-boating related) annually between 2007 and 2016. The current analysis extends and updates the findings of the June 2015 MSMR article by summarizing counts, rates, and correlates of risk of medical encounters related to accidental drownings among U.S. military members during 2013–2017.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

HIV

Infographic
9/24/2018
HIV

As part of the U.S. military’s total-force HIV screening program, civilian applicants for military service are screened for antibodies to HIV during pre-accession medical examinations. Infection with HIV is medically disqualifying for entry into U.S. military service. Since 1986, all members of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Armed Forces have been periodically screened to detect newly acquired HIV infections.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Norovirus

Infographic
8/27/2018
Norovirus

Beginning in 2011, the Operational Infectious Diseases (OID) laboratory at the Naval Health Research Center has undertaken routine surveillance of four U.S. military training facilities to systematically track the prevalence of acute gastroenteritis and to establish its etiologies among U.S. military recruits.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Staphylococcus

Infographic
8/27/2018
Staphylococcus

Staphylococcus: Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI). Military personnel in congregate settings (e.g., training, deployment) are at increased risk for S. aureus colonization and SSTI. For a 7-month period in 2016, an observational cohort study of S. aureus colonization and SSTI among U.S. Navy submariners was conducted.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Leptospirosis

Infographic
8/27/2018
Leptospriosis

Leptospirosis: The presence of leptospirosis in the Republic of Korea (ROK) poses a potential threat to more than 40,000 U.S. Armed Forces personnel and their family members who reside in the ROK. This is the first published study for risk assessment of leptospirosis among U.S. Army soldiers assigned to the ROK.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Food Allergy

Infographic
7/25/2018
Individuals with a history of food-allergy anaphylaxis or a systemic reaction to food do not meet military accession or retention standards and require a waiver in order to serve in the military.  First-line treatment for anaphylaxis includes rapid administration of epinephrine.

Individuals with a history of food-allergy anaphylaxis or a systemic reaction to food do not meet military accession or retention standards and require a waiver in order to serve in the military. First-line treatment for anaphylaxis includes rapid administration of epinephrine.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 46 - 60 Page 4 of 6

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.