Back to Top Skip to main content

Naval Medical Center Portsmouth's iTClamp wins MHS research award

Image of a plastic clamp on someone's arm The iTClamp, a mechanical wound closure device, is being demonstrated at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth. NMCP’s Combat Trauma Research Group recently won the 2020 Military Health System Research Symposium’s Team Research Award for their redesign of the device, which is superior in treating battlefield wounds, controlling blood loss from potentially lethal hemorrhages, and is faster to employ than traditional methods. (Photo by MC Seaman Ariana Torman.)

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation | Innovation | Combat Support

Naval Medical Center Portsmouth’s (NMCP) Combat Trauma Research Group (CTRG) recently received the 2020 Military Health System Research Symposium’s Team Research Award for their redesign of a mechanical wound closure device, the iTClamp.

The iTClamp is a mechanical wound closure device that seals wounds versus just putting pressure around the outside of the wound. With the new design, the product works better in junctional areas, parts of the body such as the armpit, neck, and crease of the groin, where it is more difficult to get a wrapping around the wound.

“This idea actually came about by accident,” said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Sean Stuart, NMCP’s medical director of the Emergency Department and director of the CTRG. “Our initial goal was to test the iTClamp and my team and I saw the potential for it to be used in conjunction with hemostatic wound dressing.”

During the testing process, the team had several failures and observed that the design of the device was the cause. The team then decided to publish their research and work on a redesign of the product that would make it more effective. The resulting product was superior in treating battlefield wounds, controlling blood loss from potentially lethal hemorrhages and was faster to employ than traditional methods.

Before winning the award, the CTRG conducted three trials with the first beginning two years ago. The first trial was a research trial that identified areas that needed to be addressed to successfully redesign the device. The second trial was another research trial where the device was tested. The third trial tested not only how the device worked in general, but how it worked in the hands of its intended users, corpsmen. Stuart believes that adding this element to the trial is what set their group apart from others.

“I need to know how my corpsmen can perform with devices and how it will be used on the front lines,” said Stuart. “Is it easy to use? Is it functional? The results from their feedback validated the feasibility of service wide employment of this device.”

The collaborative effort by the members of the CTRG through these three trials resulted in a new, effective, in-field hemorrhage-control technique that will advance the mission of preserving life on the battlefield.

“Hemorrhage control of bleeding is one our biggest problems in military medicine,” said Stuart. “Our motto is ‘saving lives on the battlefield’, and as operational physicians, we have experiences that give us unique insight that backs our research, which others may not have.”

Stuart believes that research is a team effort and a very involved process.

“We have a robust team with a lot of moving parts and that’s why we’ve been able to win this award and do such great things,” said Stuart. “Only through a team approach can you pull off something so complex without missing anything.”

Stuart recognized Dr. Emily Fredrick, the CTRG’s program manager, for keeping all of the parts of the project moving forward.

“It certainly does feel good to have won this award,” said Stuart. “People may not realize the hundreds of hours that goes into developing, designing, and acquiring funds for a study. The group’s purpose is to conduct research that impacts the operational warfighter, so it was rewarding to get that positive feedback and know that something we did is making an impact.”

You also may be interested in...

Navy Medicine researchers kick off 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium with strong showing

Article
8/20/2019
Navy Medicine West Commander Rear Adm. Tim Weber (right) discusses research findings with scientists from Navy Medicine's hospitals and research labs during the first poster session at the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium. (U.S. Navy photo By Regena Kowitz)

Dozens of scientists from Navy are presenting their work

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation

Individuals, teams honored at MHSRS for exemplary research

Article
8/20/2019
Navy Vice Adm. Raquel C. Bono and Navy Rear Adm. Mary C. Riggs join individual and team award winners honored at the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium on Monday, August 19th in Kissimmee, Florida. (MHS photo)

New nurse researcher award debuts this year

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation

DHA plus DLA equals one joint approach for health care logistics

Article
8/20/2019
Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, DHA director (left), and Army Lt. Gen. Darrell Williams, DLA director (right) signed a memorandum of agreement on Aug. 15, at Defense Health Headquarters. The agreement clarifies the agencies' complementary roles and responsibilities, avoiding duplication of effort while retaining DLA as DHA's acquisition enabler of choice for medical materiel. (MHS photo)

Agency directors sign memorandum of agreement

Recommended Content:

Combat Support | Medical Logistics

Research for Readiness: Military Health System kicks off annual symposium

Article
8/20/2019
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, Thomas McCaffery, welcomed attendees to the Military Health System Research Symposium on Monday, August 19th at the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Florida. (MHS photo)

Research, development ensures service members are better prepared, better protected, better cared for

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation

DHA-PI 3200.01: Research and Development (R&D) Enterprise Activity (EA)

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Procedural Instruction (DHA-PI), based on the authority of References (a) and (b), and in accordance with the guidance of References (c) through (p): a. Establishes the Defense Health Agency’s (DHA) procedures for the Deputy Assistant Director (DAD), R&D to manage and execute, on behalf of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs (ASD(HA)), the portion of the Defense Health Program (DHP) Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E) appropriation assigned to it (referred to as the “DHP Science and Technology (S&T) Program)”. The DHP S&T Program includes Budget Activities (BAs) 6.1-6.3 and 6.6. The ASD(HA) provides policy, direction, and guidance to inform planning, programming, budgeting, and execution of the DHP RDT&E appropriation in accordance with statute, regulation, and policy in Reference (a). The DAD-R&D, and Component Acquisition Executive (CAE) manage and execute DHP RDT&E Program funds aligned to them on behalf of the ASD(HA). The CAE is responsible for managing BAs 6.4, 6.5, and 6.7 funding, as well as Procurement and Operations and Maintenance funding required to support DHP-funded Acquisition Programs, regardless of acquisition activity. b. Supports the Director, DHA, in developing appropriate DHA management models to maximize efficiencies in the management and execution of DHP RDT&E-funded activities carried out by the Combatant Commands (CCMDs), Services, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), Defense Agencies, and other DoD Components, as applicable. c. Codifies processes to confirm DHP RDT&E funds are applied towards medical priorities and aligned to ASD(HA) policy, direction, and guidance to develop and deliver innovative medical products and solutions that increase the readiness of the DoD medical mission in accordance with Reference (a). d. Supports the following objectives of the R&D EA: (1) Increasing the quantity, quality, and pace of medical research through improved programmatic organization, processes, and oversight. (2) Ensuring DHP RDT&E funded efforts align to ASD(HA) published program guidance that provides resourcing guidance and translates national, departmental, and Service priorities into specific program objectives. (3) Verifying alignment of DHP RDT&E funds to medical priorities and to ASD(HA) policy, direction, and guidance to ensure the development and delivery of medical materiel and knowledge solutions. (4) Facilitating coordination with the CCMDs, Services, USU, Defense Agencies, and other DoD Components, as applicable, to ensure DHP RDT&E funded activities address joint medical capability gaps, and avoid unnecessary duplication.

Zapping mosquitoes from the inside out

Article
7/29/2019
While chemical mosquito population control measures have been used with some degree of success, they are toxic to other insect populations and to the health of humans. A different angle of defense has emerged, which is genetic modification of the mosquito itself, making it transgenic. Transgenic mosquitoes are unable to transmit a pathogen, such as malaria, due to their altered genetic makeup. (DoD photo)

Mosquitoes aren’t just annoying at summer barbecues. In many parts of the world, they carry pathogens for Zika, dengue, yellow fever and malaria, the most devastating of mosquito-borne diseases. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 440,000 people died in sub-Saharan Africa in 2016 from malaria, contracted from the bite of an infected female Anopheles mosquito. Protecting U.S. military personnel who continue to serve in this part of world is critical.

Recommended Content:

Mosquito-Borne Illnesses | Zika Virus | Preventing Mosquito-Borne Illnesses | Medical and Dental Preventive Care Fitness | Innovation | Medical Research and Development | Deployment Health

Stop the Bleed: A battlefield innovation on civilian soil

Article
7/19/2019
USU's Dr. Craig Goolsby (center) observes as high school students at a conference in Orlando, Florida, practice using a tourniquet after watching a web-based tutorial. Goolsby is researching effective teaching methods as part of a grant to develop a trauma first-aid course for students that incorporates elements of Stop the Bleed. (USU photo by Sarah Marshall)

Program teaches public how to respond to bleeding emergencies

Recommended Content:

Public Health | Innovation | Medical Research and Development | Emergency Preparedness and Response

New DHA health services research funding opportunity available

Article
7/1/2019
The Defense Health Agency Research and Development Directorate wordcloud. (MHS graphic)

This new funding opportunity is available to both intramural and extramural research organizations

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation

AFRICOM holds annual Command Surgeon Conference

Article
6/3/2019
Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee E. Payne. DHA assistant director for combat support, talks to attendees of the 2019 U.S. Africa Command Command Surgeon Synchronization Conference May 28, 2019 in Stuttgart, Germany. Payne discussed upcoming changes to the military health system and what that means for patients and providers. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Hurd/Released)

The conference brought together medical professionals from across the command, and interagency and foreign partners, to enable collaboration and discuss areas of concern

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Combat Support | Global Health Engagement

Surgeons perform first bioengineered blood vessel transplant in military patient

Article
5/28/2019
Development of the Human Acellular Vessel, or HAV, starts by taking living cells from a human blood vessel and placing them onto a tube-shaped frame. These vascular cells are kept alive in an organ chamber, growing around the tube-shaped lattice. Over time, the lattice that was used to seed the original vascular cells dissolves, and scientists remove the original cells so the new vessel doesn’t cause an immune response when it’s implanted. What is left is a solid, tubular structure made of human vascular material that looks and acts like a blood vessel -- thus, the bio-engineered and newly-grown blood vessel, or HAV. (USU medical illustration by Sofia Echelmeyer)

Injury to major blood vessels of the body is the most common cause of death and disability in combat

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation | Technology

Dummies for doctors

Article
5/14/2019
Air Force Col. Christine Kress (center) observes use of a medical canine mannequin designed to create training environments that prepare medical professionals for events they may face in the field. (MHS photo)

How technology is preparing the next generation of docs for the battlefield

Recommended Content:

Technology | Combat Support

Enhancing Combat Readiness

Presentation
11/28/2018

Maj Gen Lee Payne, USAF, MC, CFS, Assistant Director-Combat Support, Defense Health Agency

Recommended Content:

Combat Support

Premier scientific symposium showcases medical research and development

Article
8/20/2018
Dr. Terry Adirim, deputy assistant secretary of defense for Health Services Policy and Oversight, speaks at a plenary session at the 2018 Military Health System Research Symposium, Aug. 20, at the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Florida. The theme of this year’s meeting is “Medical Innovation for Warfighter Readiness: The Future Starts Now.” (MHSRS photo)

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation

Improving Defense Health Program Medical Research Processes

Report
8/8/2017

A report from the Defense Health Board (DHB) that summarizes the findings and recommendations from its independent review of Improving Defense Health Program (DHP) Medical Research Processes.

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation | Health Readiness

Defense Health Agency Overview

Presentation
2/9/2017

Defense Health Agency Overview

Recommended Content:

Military Medical History | Research and Innovation
<< < ... 6 7 8 9 10  ... > >> 
Showing results 91 - 105 Page 7 of 13

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.