Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Real Warriors provides suicide prevention tools for all beneficiaries

Sunset light creates silhouette of two military personnel Soldiers from Delta Company, 2-108th Infantry Battalion, 27th Brigade, conduct a partnered-Afghan National Security Force security patrol at dusk. (Photo by Army 1st Lt. Jason Uhlig.)

Recommended Content:

Suicide Prevention | Psychological Fitness

Every September, the Department of Defense and the nation place the medical spotlight on suicide prevention with Suicide Prevention Month.

However, suicide prevention is important every day especially for our nation’s wounded, ill, and injured service members and their families. Recovering service members often face emotional or psychological concerns after experiencing a serious injury or illness, which can put them at greater risk for suicide.

Within the Defense Health Agency, the Real Warriors Campaign promotes a culture of support for psychological health by encouraging the military community to reach out for help if struggling with a psychological health concern.

Real Warriors supports the DHA’s Psychological Health Center of Excellence in its mission to break the stigma associated with psychological health concerns. The campaign focuses on encouraging help-seeking behavior among service members, veterans, and military families that may be coping with invisible wounds.

Significant changes in daily behavior and experiences may increase suicide ideation and suicide-related behavior. These changes may include the loss of a fellow warrior, friend, or loved one; trouble sleeping; disciplinary or legal action; health, financial, or relationship problems; feelings of failure; difficulties at work; or other personal issues.

“If you start to notice changes in a loved one’s behavior that seem to persist, it may be time to start a conversation with that person,” advised Dr. Nick Polizzi, a psychologist and the Real Warriors Campaign government action officer.

Real Warriors advises those in the military community to reach out for help if they experience or see these risk factors with their friends or loved ones.

Real Warriors also offers the following techniques to discuss with your provider in aiding your recovery:

  1. Confide in someone you trust. Speak with a family member, fellow warrior, unit leader, or military chaplain. Talking about what is bothering you is a great first step in the process of receiving support, getting other perspectives, and reducing distress.
  2. Make your environment safe. Give any potentially dangerous items to a trusted person if you feel such items are unsafe with you.
  3. Avoid alcohol and other substances. Substance misuse may feel like “medicine” for your stress level while making your thoughts worse.
  4. Take care of your mind and body. Healthy ways to manage stress include physical activities like walking and running, other activities and hobbies, and different forms of relaxation, such as deep breathing and mindfulness meditation.
  5. Write it out. Consider using a journal to express pain, anger, fear, or other emotions.

If you feel like you are in crisis or if you’re having suicidal thoughts, seek help from a health care provider.

All service members, veterans, and their families are encouraged to contact the Military Crisis Line at 800-273-8255 and press 1 to speak with a trained counselor. The support is free, confidential, and available every day 24/7.

If you or a loved one need information about psychological health concerns, contact the Psychological Health Resource Center at 866-966-1020 to confidentially speak with trained health resource consultants 24/7.

For additional information about suicide prevention, visit the Real Warriors Campaign.

Remember, reaching out is a sign of strength.

You also may be interested in...

People First priority for BJACH Behavioral Health Suicide Prevention Program

Article Around MHS
12/1/2021
Chuck Satterfield and Staff Sgt. Lori Fury hosting a training

Behavioral health professionals from Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital conducted leadership development training with the 519th Military Police Battalion at the Joint Readiness Training Center and Fort Polk, Louisiana in mid-November.

Recommended Content:

Psychological Fitness | Suicide Prevention

Mental Stress is like a ‘Check Engine Light’ Flashing–Don’t Ignore It

Article
11/29/2021
Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Jason David talks about his  journey of recovery through the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program during a video conversation with Defense Health Agency Command Sgt. Major Michael Gragg.

Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Jason David speaks about his own journey of recovery through the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Warrior Care | Warrior Care – A Virtual Show of Strength | Psychological Fitness

Healing Is An Art, Art is Healing: Exhibit Highlights the Healing Power of Art

Article Around MHS
11/10/2021
Service members look at art included in the Healing Arts Exhibit on display throughout November at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

Healing is an art, and art is healing was the sentiments shared among those who attended the opening ceremony for the 18th Annual Healing Arts Exhibit at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Oct. 27.

Recommended Content:

Psychological Fitness

Following Report, DOD to Redouble Suicide Prevention Efforts

Article Around MHS
10/5/2021
A person helps another person up.

Following a recent report about suicide, the DOD redouble efforts to prevent suicides.

Recommended Content:

Suicide Prevention | Suicide Prevention Resources

Mental health is health says SECDEF: AF Academy tackles suicide prevention

Article Around MHS
10/1/2021
National Suicide Prevention Month yellow poster

September marks National Suicide Prevention Month

Recommended Content:

Suicide Prevention

Marine Sgt. John Peck

Photo
9/29/2021
Portrait photo of John Peck

From losing all four limbs in an IED explosion in Afghanistan in 2010, to battling back from being on the brink of suicide, Marine Sgt. John Peck now hopes to help people who may be in their own dark place as an author and motivational speaker (Photo courtesy of John Peck).

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury | Suicide Prevention | Talking About Afghanistan

Back from the Brink: One Marine's Recovery from Suicidal Thoughts

Article
9/29/2021
Portrait photo of John Peck

After suffering a TBI in Iraq and losing all four limbs in Afghanistan, Marine Sgt. John Peck talks about his own experience and the differences in the ways in which individuals deal with traumatic life events.

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury | Suicide Prevention | Talking About Afghanistan

You Are Not Alone - Mental Health Care is Not One-Size-Fits-All

Article
9/21/2021
Soldier with head in hand.

There are many options for support available to those who are having thoughts of suicide and those around them.

Recommended Content:

Psychological Health Resource Center | 24/7 | Suicide Prevention | Talking About Afghanistan

suicide prevention event main photo 2021

Photo
9/20/2021
Drunk man sits on sofa with his head in his hands. He is in mental pain.

Suicide awareness is a serious issue. If you are having suicidal thoughts or plans, seek help. Time is of the essence.

Recommended Content:

Suicide Prevention

Suicide is Preventable and Should Be Treated Like a Health Problem

Article
9/20/2021
Drunk man sits on sofa with his head in his hands. He is in mental pain.

Suicide is a preventable health crisis and should be treated like other health crises, such as heart attacks.

Recommended Content:

Suicide Prevention

Resources to help those left behind in wake of suicide

Article Around MHS
9/16/2021
A cell phone is used to contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, which provides free and confidential support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress, also features information on its website for loss survivors and how to support someone who has lost a loved one.

Recommended Content:

Suicide Prevention

Osan's mental health team connects with Airmen

Article Around MHS
9/16/2021
L. Diane Heard, 51st Munitions Squadron, violence prevention integrator, sits at her desk at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea.

Osan’s violence prevention team is finding ways to reach out to the Airmen who need them, keeping with the current motto of “Connect to Protect.”

Recommended Content:

Suicide Prevention

Navy Spouse Seeks Mental Health Care through the MHS

Article
9/15/2021
Military personnel in front of a helicopter

Army public affairs officer deals with mental health crisis.

Recommended Content:

Mental Health Toolkit

Ask the Doc: I've Got a Friend I'm Worried About – What Should I Do?

Article
9/15/2021
Soldiers conduct a ruck march on airfield.

Doc talks to Dr. Tim Hoyt, chief of Psychological Health Promotion and supervisor of the Combat and Operational Stress Control mission at the Psychological Health Center of Excellence, about some of the ways to go about addressing your concerns with a friend you may think is in danger of harming themself.

Recommended Content:

Psychological Health Center of Excellence | Suicide Prevention | Ask The Doc

It's Okay to Ask for Help

Article Around MHS
9/8/2021
Photo By Tech. Sgt. Victor J. Caputo | September is Suicide Prevention Month, with September 5 through 11 marking National Suicide Prevention Week. While it is every Airman's duty to watch out for their wingmen, it is also important for Airmen to understand the vast amount of resources available to them if they are experiencing their own personal crisis. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Tech. Sgt. Victor J. Caputo)

This commentary reflects the author’s personal experiences seeking mental health treatment. His experience is not necessarily reflective of any other individual’s experiences, which can vary due to any number of factors, including past experiences, family history, AFSC, or special qualifications.

Recommended Content:

Suicide Prevention | Suicide Prevention - Connect to Protect: Help is Within Reach
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 14

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.