Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Walter Reed, VA focus on joint efforts in 3D medical application

Three physicians wearing masks; one sitting at a desk, two standing Peter Liacouras, Ph.D., director of the 3-D Medical Applications Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, explains to physicians from the Washington DC Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center the capabilities of the 3D MAC at WRNMMC. (Photo by Bernard Little, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.)

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation | Technology | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Leadership from the Washington, D.C. Veterans Affairs Medical Center visited Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last month to acknowledge the new Joint Incentive Fund (JIF) award between the two centers.

The JIF award focuses on the Department of Defense/VA 3D Printing Consortium for Medical Applications. The total JIF award was for more than $8.8 million with the WRNMMC/3D MAC portion at over $4.1 million for a project length of two years, according to Dr. Peter Liacouras, director of the services for WRNMMC’s 3D Medical Application Center.

In 2002, the 3D MAC opened at the former Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC), a predecessor of WRNMMC with the former National Naval Medical Center (NNMC), stated Liacouras, who joined the 3D MAC team in 2006. He added that in the late 1990s, an individual at NNMC was doing some 3D printing as well.

In 2007, the Naval Postgraduate Dental School (NPDS), at the then NNMC, started to invest in 3D printing for dental prosthetics, and then in 2011 with the Base Realignment and Closure law, the 3D MAC was relocated from the closing WRAMC to the new WRNMMC, Liacouras explained.

According to Military Health System (MHS) officials, the JIF was established under Section 721 of the FY 2003 National Defense Authorization Act “to provide seed money and incentives for innovative DoD/VA joint sharing initiatives to recapture Purchased CareThe TRICARE Health Program is often referred to as purchased care. It is the services we “purchase” through the managed care support contracts.purchased care, improve quality and drive cost savings at facilities, regional and national levels. JIF is only designated for use by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and Defense Health Agency (DHA) entities for direct medical sharing initiatives or for services or systems that facilitate DOD/VA interoperability.”

“Telehealth and 3D printing in health care settings are the wave of the future,” VA Secretary Robert Wilkie recently stated. In March, VA activated its 3D printing network to test 3D designs of medical equipment used by the nation’s health-care providers to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. This effort included developing 3D masks and other critical personal protective equipment (face shields, masks and ventilators) to bolster the nation’s fight against COVID-19.

Group of men, wearing masks, standing in front of a building
Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Director Army Col. (Dr.) Andrew Barr (fifth from left) and Director of the Washington DC Veterans Affairs Medical Center retired Army Col. Michael Heimall (sixth from left), along with members of their leadership team, met on Oct. 20 at WRNMMC to acknowledge the multi-million dollar Joint Incentive Fund award between the two centers focused on jointly advancing 3D medical technology for Military Health System and VA beneficiaries. (Photo by Bernard Little, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.)

The VA is the first integrated health care system in the country to establish a national 3D Printing Network, allowing its health-care staff to share ideas, resources and best practices to deliver quality care to patients throughout its enterprise, according to VA officials. This collaboration will include the 3D at WRNMMC.

“The VA and DOD share a vision to provide a centralized system of services to service members that will benefit them throughout a lifetime,” Liacouras stated. “This system is created through an interdependent network of partnerships and establishes a national model for excellence, quality, access, satisfaction, and value.”

He explained the vision is supported by three key goals:

  • Delivering comprehensive benefits and services through an integrated client-centric approach that anticipates and addresses client needs.
  • Providing a patient-centered health-care system that delivers excellent quality, access, satisfaction, and value, consistently across the departments.
  • Establishing a national model for the effective and efficient delivery of benefits and services through joint planning and execution.

Liacouras further added that the JIF proposal sought funding to unify field-level DOD and VA hospital 3D printing efforts into a scalable DoD/VA 3D Printing Consortium through joint planning and execution.

At WRNMMC, the five-person 3D MAC team uses digital technology combined with additive manufacturing to provide medical-specific models and devices for MHS beneficiaries. The team produces custom implants, medical simulators, surgical guides, orthotics, prosthetic devices and patient-based anatomical models. They also assists in virtual-treatment planning, image capturing and research projects throughout DOD. The 3D MAC at WRNMMC is the DOD’s largest 3D medical printing center with a team that serves not only WRNMMC beneficiaries, but also other military facilities, federal entities and worldwide allied medical institutions.

This JIF award will allow WRNMMC to update and purchase multiple 3D printers and other digital technology; register with the FDA as a medical manufacturer; and increase training within WRNMMC and DOD.

Liacouras, explained to the capabilities of the center, elaborating on its role in four main areas of reconstructing patient radiological images to produce medical models and devices; developing new, low cost, high fidelity simulation models for resident training; designing and manufacturing unique limb prosthetic attachments for specialty activities; and producing devices and assisting in numerous research projects.

The 3D MAC team produces more than 1,000 products annually in support of military medicine, according to Liacouras.

Liacouras explained how the 3D MAC’s expertise, combined with collaborations across hospital departments and within DOD provides physicians and other professionals with the opportunity to use the state-of-the-art technology to positively impact the quality of life for military members and their families.

You also may be interested in...

World AIDS Day puts spotlight on landmark DoD study

Article
12/2/2019
Dr. John Mascola, director of the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center, discusses HIV vaccine progress at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Nov. 26, during a World AIDS Day commemoration.  (U.S. Army photo)

Vaccine study shows infection risk lowered by 31 percent, offering hope for future

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Research and Innovation | Global Health Engagement

Artificial intelligence makes its way to dermatology clinic

Article
11/18/2019
Air Force Maj. Thomas Beachkofsky, 6th Health Care Operations Squadron dermatologist, uses a body scanner microscope to take a picture of a spot on his arm at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida. A new software upgrade allows a complex algorithm to analyze an image captured with a camera and rate the severity of the spot for a dermatologist to review. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Adam R. Shanks)

The software was able to correctly identify 95% of malignant skin tumors

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Technology

Women in DHA create impact across the federal health community

Article
11/4/2019
Retired Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, former director of the Defense Health Agency, accepts the Lifetime Achievement Award from FedHealthIT during their Leading for Impact in Federal IT & Consulting, Women in Leadership Conference in Arlington, Va. (DHA Photo by Hannah Wagner)

FedHealthIT recognized two DHA leaders, past and present, for their government service during a ceremony in Arlington, Va.

Recommended Content:

Innovation | Research and Innovation

Medical tools, supplies 3D printed in desert deployment

Article
11/1/2019
Army Lt. Col. Jason Barnhill, a faculty member of West Point and the Uniformed Services University’s Department of Radiology, poses for a photo with a 3D printer capable of biofabrication that could expedite repair or perhaps replace damaged tissues for troops injured on the battlefield. (Courtesy photo)

3D printing provides the ability to produce tailored health care solutions

Recommended Content:

Technology

State of the art procedure is the first within DoD

Article
10/28/2019
Retired Capt. Eugene Chalaire was the first to undergo an intricate cancer-preventive procedure performed at Womack Army Medical Center this summer. Womack is the first within the DoD to offer this service. (U.S. Army photo)

Only a handful of medical centers in the United States perform this surgery

Recommended Content:

Technology | Military Hospitals and Clinics

DHA IPM 18-013: Risk Management Framework (RMF)

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Interim Procedures Memorandum (DHA-IPM), based on the authority of References (a) through (c), and in accordance with the guidance of References (d) through (ac): • Incorporates cybersecurity strategy, policy, awareness/training, assessment, continuous monitoring, authorization, implementation, and remediation. • Aligns with the Deputy Assistant Director, Information Operations (DAD IO) J-6/Chief Information Officer’s (CIO) key concept of increasing cybersecurity of Defense Health Agency’s (DHA) Information Technology (IT); therefore, robust risk assessment and management is required. • Encompasses lifecycle risk management to determine and manage the residual cybersecurity risk. • This DHA-IPM is effective immediately; it will be converted into a DHA-Procedural Instruction. This DHA-IPM will expire effective 12 months from the date of issue.

  • Identification #: 18-013
  • Date: 9/20/2019
  • Type: DHA Interim Procedures Memorandum
  • Topics: Technology

DHA IPM 18-011: Video Network Center (VNC) Endpoint Standards

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Interim Procedures Memorandum (DHA-IPM), based on the authority of References (a) through (c), and in accordance with the guidance of References (d) through (g): - Provides guidance for video network endpoint standards required for sites to connect to the Defense Health Agency (DHA) VNC network. These standards will help ensure security compliance, efficiency, and best practices are maintained across the DHA network. Meeting certification requirements brings many benefits, including: increased assurances of a successful video teleconference (VTC) experience, full access to bridge and point-to-point calls, and access to peer video networks, including the Department of Veterans Affairs, academia, and industry partners. Compliance with stated standards does not preclude users connecting to other DoD approved networks. - This DHA-IPM is effective immediately; it will be converted into a DHA-Procedural Instruction. This DHA-IPM will expire effective 12 months from the date of issue.

  • Identification #: 18-011
  • Date: 9/20/2019
  • Type: DHA Interim Procedures Memorandum
  • Topics: Technology

Unleashing innovation to support field medics, corpsmen

Article
9/13/2019
A drone lifts off during the Hive Final Mile demonstration on Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia. Drones are one of the autonomous technologies that might soon be helping medics provide care for warfighters on distant battlefields. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jacqueline A. Clifford)

Imagine unmanned vehicles bringing medical supplies or blood products to support a field medic’s care of wounded soldiers, or even transporting a wounded warfighter to safety. Researchers at the Army’s Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, or TATRC, are collaborating with the Services, academia and private industry to make such scenarios a reality.

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation | Innovation

Research for Readiness: Military Health System kicks off annual symposium

Article
8/20/2019
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, Thomas McCaffery, welcomed attendees to the Military Health System Research Symposium on Monday, August 19th at the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Florida. (MHS photo)

Research, development ensures service members are better prepared, better protected, better cared for

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation

Navy Medicine researchers kick off 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium with strong showing

Article
8/20/2019
Navy Medicine West Commander Rear Adm. Tim Weber (right) discusses research findings with scientists from Navy Medicine's hospitals and research labs during the first poster session at the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium. (U.S. Navy photo By Regena Kowitz)

Dozens of scientists from Navy are presenting their work

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation

Individuals, teams honored at MHSRS for exemplary research

Article
8/20/2019
Navy Vice Adm. Raquel C. Bono and Navy Rear Adm. Mary C. Riggs join individual and team award winners honored at the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium on Monday, August 19th in Kissimmee, Florida. (MHS photo)

New nurse researcher award debuts this year

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation | Nurses Week

Day 1 at the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium

Video
8/20/2019
DHA Seal

Navy Medicine researchers from across the globe convened Aug. 19 in Kissimmee, Florida for the start of the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS) to discuss the latest scientific advances and initiatives that support warfighter health, readiness, and survivability. We had a chance to catch up with Navy Medicine leaders to get their perspectives on the impact of research to the warfighter, the Fleet, and the Fleet Marine Force.

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation

Special Needs Program Management Information System (SNPMIS)

Fact Sheet
8/15/2019

SNPMIS documents and reports on services provided to TRICARE patients with special needs.

Recommended Content:

Technology | Solution Delivery Division

DHA-PI 3200.01: Research and Development (R&D) Enterprise Activity (EA)

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Procedural Instruction (DHA-PI), based on the authority of References (a) and (b), and in accordance with the guidance of References (c) through (p): a. Establishes the Defense Health Agency’s (DHA) procedures for the Deputy Assistant Director (DAD), R&D to manage and execute, on behalf of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs (ASD(HA)), the portion of the Defense Health Program (DHP) Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E) appropriation assigned to it (referred to as the “DHP Science and Technology (S&T) Program)”. The DHP S&T Program includes Budget Activities (BAs) 6.1-6.3 and 6.6. The ASD(HA) provides policy, direction, and guidance to inform planning, programming, budgeting, and execution of the DHP RDT&E appropriation in accordance with statute, regulation, and policy in Reference (a). The DAD-R&D, and Component Acquisition Executive (CAE) manage and execute DHP RDT&E Program funds aligned to them on behalf of the ASD(HA). The CAE is responsible for managing BAs 6.4, 6.5, and 6.7 funding, as well as Procurement and Operations and Maintenance funding required to support DHP-funded Acquisition Programs, regardless of acquisition activity. b. Supports the Director, DHA, in developing appropriate DHA management models to maximize efficiencies in the management and execution of DHP RDT&E-funded activities carried out by the Combatant Commands (CCMDs), Services, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), Defense Agencies, and other DoD Components, as applicable. c. Codifies processes to confirm DHP RDT&E funds are applied towards medical priorities and aligned to ASD(HA) policy, direction, and guidance to develop and deliver innovative medical products and solutions that increase the readiness of the DoD medical mission in accordance with Reference (a). d. Supports the following objectives of the R&D EA: (1) Increasing the quantity, quality, and pace of medical research through improved programmatic organization, processes, and oversight. (2) Ensuring DHP RDT&E funded efforts align to ASD(HA) published program guidance that provides resourcing guidance and translates national, departmental, and Service priorities into specific program objectives. (3) Verifying alignment of DHP RDT&E funds to medical priorities and to ASD(HA) policy, direction, and guidance to ensure the development and delivery of medical materiel and knowledge solutions. (4) Facilitating coordination with the CCMDs, Services, USU, Defense Agencies, and other DoD Components, as applicable, to ensure DHP RDT&E funded activities address joint medical capability gaps, and avoid unnecessary duplication.

New DHA health services research funding opportunity available

Article
7/1/2019
The Defense Health Agency Research and Development Directorate wordcloud. (MHS graphic)

This new funding opportunity is available to both intramural and extramural research organizations

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 61 - 75 Page 5 of 16

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.