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NMRTU Everett Hospitalman makes a difference

Image of Technician wearing a mask, giving a shot to a soldier. Click to open a larger version of the image. Primarily handling duties as an immunization technician, Hospitalman Paighton Scott, a Clovis, Calif. native attached to Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command Bremerton’s Navy Medicine Readiness Training Unit Everett, was recently selected as Blue Jacket of the Quarter, due to dedication to her responsibilities and professionalism. (Official Navy photo courtesy of NMRTU Everett.)

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It didn’t take long for Navy Hospitalman Paighton Scott to make a noticeable difference.

Scott was recently selected amongst her peers as Navy Medical Readiness and Training Command (NMRTC) Bremerton’s Blue Jacket of the Quarter.

The award is presented to enlisted personnel – such as Scott, assigned to NMRTC Bremerton’s Navy Medicine Readiness Training Unit (NMRTU) Everett - who stand out from others in similar paygrades due to dedication to their responsibilities and professionalism. Scott was cited as an example of the Navy core values of honor, courage and commitment, along with the command’s standards of care, competence and compassion.

“I was incredibly proud of myself, I felt as if all of my hard work had paid off, and I was just really excited to represent NMRTU Everett and make my command proud,” said Scott, who has served as a Navy hospital corpsman for approximately 18 months.

“Receiving this award really makes me feel like I made the right decision with my career,” said Scott, who primarily works as an immunization technician. “I have always loved medical, but finding out that I’m good at it and I am excelling in it is insanely reassuring and exciting.”

Scott’s Navy Medicine career actually began well before her active duty status, even before graduating from Clovis East.

“A month after I turned 17, as a senior in high school, I went to the recruiting office and a week later I was sworn in,” Scott said. “I have always wanted to work in the medical field, so choosing my rate wasn’t hard at all.”

Her interest in a career with Navy Medicine was prompted by both financial considerations as well as the decision to enter a service branch with a good track record in supporting advancement goals of those seeking to further their aspirations.

“I couldn’t afford college. Navy Medicine presented a lot of opportunities other than just college. I have acquired a tremendous amount of knowledge that I know will help me excel in a career in the medical field,” Scott said. “It is an absolute honor to know that my hard work contributes to the mission and has so much meaning. Even when it feels like something small, it is vital.”

Scott said she knew growing up that supporting those in need was a possible career choice.

“I have always loved caring for people, especially children.I was a nanny before joining the Navy,” Scott said. “I wasn’t sure if I wanted to be a teacher or a medical professional until a very close family member was admitted into the ICU – intensive care unit – and kept inpatient for almost two weeks when I was 16. Watching how caring and attentive they were in saving her life kind of resolved any uncertainty that I had.”

Already in her brief time, Scott readily affirms that Navy Medicine has provided a greater sense of responsibility for her. 

“Knowing that people choose to come to me and count on me to help them or get a job done really makes me feel like I’m exactly where I’m meant to be,” said Scott, and her workload at NMRTU Everett would seemingly confirm that.

Along with immunizations technician, Scott is a Family Medicine corpsman, a Periodic Health Assessment record reviewer, a Central Sterilization Room secondary technician, a Sexual Assault Prevention Response victim advocate and a Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set secondary user. She also handles collateral duties as a member of the command’s Diversity Committee, and serves as Junior Enlisted Association public affairs officer.

For much of 2020, Scott has also done her share and more to help stop the spread of COVID-19.

“Working at the clinic Entry Control Point I screen patients for possible COVID-19 symptoms, coordinate with all clinic departments to ensure that patients do not overflow in waiting rooms and that patients are complying with mandated face covering and social distancing guidelines,” Scott said. “This guarantees that all patients and staff members are kept safe and healthy within the premises.”

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