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Navy corpsman provides multitude of support to hospital

Image of Two military personnel, wearing masks, in a supply room looking at the shelves. Click to open a larger version of the image. Navy Hospitalman Paul Tie, assigned to Naval Hospital Bremerton’s (NHB) Multi Service Unit explains to Navy Capt. Shannon Johnson, NHB/Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command commanding officer the recent overhaul of the unit’s supply room, effectively improving access to daily needs, repositioning emergency supply resources and reallocating under-utilized stock elsewhere. (Photo by Douglas H Stutz, NHB/NMRTC Bremerton.)

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When there was a need for logistical ingenuity and organizational initiative, Navy Hospitalman Paul Tie knew just what to do.

To ensure Naval Hospital Bremerton’s (NHB) Multi Service Unit was prepared to handle same-day surgery requirements in support of ambulatory procedure unit (APU) outpatient needs, Tie overhauled the Multi-Service Unit (MSU) supply room.

“This project began as a reorganization. That was the general idea, which does affect several things,” said Tie, who started at NHB as a general duty corpsman on MSU and is currently the assistant leading petty officer (ALPO) and supply petty officer.

“We only needed about a quarter of the supplies in the supply room for APU operations. We were able to reallocate some of those supplies to other departments that utilize them. I personally brought items to different departments to be used,” explained Tie, noting that infant formulas were sent to the Labor and Delivery Department along with IV fluids, which were also sent to the Urgent Care Clinic.

Tie also assisted the daily tally with all supply items. He reorganized the remaining, existing stock which placed all commonly used items up front in the initial few columns of supply bins. That simple relocation move made it easier to retrieve, as well as determine, which items need replenishing.

“Tie has kept supplies and equipment ready in the case of COVID-19 patients or anything else. He also tracks bio medical repairs on equipment and supply order,” added Navy Lt. Kaitlyn Harmon, who serves as the ward’s department head.

Tie has also rearranged various supplies that are not used every day but are crucial in emergency situations for replenishing code-carts and responding to an emergency, such as an adult/pediatric cardiac or respiratory arrest.

“At the time I thought of this project, it was at the height of the COVID-19 response where we were all adjusting to the new procedures. As little as this project was, I hope it gave the command a little ease,” Tie said. 

 “It has been great in terms of morale. We are a proud unit. We did what we can do to make our department great. We do have great working relationship inside and outside the department. With this project, it gave a sense of purpose,” Tie said. “Thinking outside the box is what makes a great person let alone a Sailor. After this recognition, it gave me motivation to suggest improvements for the better of the department.”

Although Tie’s career in Navy Medicine started at NMRTC Bremerton, his interest in medicine was ingrained years earlier.

“Medicine alone is interesting enough because I believe that every individual has to have a little bit of medical experience,” said Tie. “Serving this country has always been what I wanted to do. Being here and making little positive differences with the lives of my fellow Sailors means so much to me.”

After completing high school at Angelicum College, Quezon City, Philippines, he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Information Technology.  After attending San Beda College in Manila, Philippines, he immigrated to the United States and eventually joined the Navy in 2019.

Along with his current role, Tie is also actively engaged in helping stop the spread of COVID-19.

As a father and a husband, what I can do to protect my family from the virus is follow CDC protocols,” related Tie. “As an ALPO, I look after my fellow corpsmen making sure they are getting the support they need, on and off work and by being the voice to remind our people that this will not last forever. It is difficult since this is not what we are used to. All we have to do it be patient and comply.”

Assigned to a Navy Medicine platform, Tie affirms he’s part of the command effort in support to others in need, and not just during the ongoing pandemic outbreak.

Compassion and humility are required as medical personnel,” Tie stated. “I always remember that we are in the position to make a lasting impression on a person’s life. With these difficult times, we are in a place to make someone’s day better.”

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