Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Surveillance snapshot: Health care burden attributable to osteoarthritis and spondylosis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016–2020

Image of Air Force security forces trainees climb a hill during a 3-mile ruck march to commemorate National Police Week at Joint Base San Antonio, May 13, 2019. Photo By: Sarayuth Pinthong, Air Force. Air Force security forces trainees climb a hill during a 3-mile ruck march to commemorate National Police Week at Joint Base San Antonio, May 13, 2019. Photo By: Sarayuth Pinthong, Air Force

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Osteoarthritis (OA) and spondylosis (OA of the spine) can result in pain and functional impairment and account for significant morbidity burdens among U.S. civilian and military populations.1–3 Management of cases of OA requires substantial health care resources and incurs considerable costs.4 A recent MSMR analysis described the incidence of OA and spondylosis diagnoses among active component service members of the U.S. Armed Forces during 2016–2020.5 Crude annual incidence rates of both conditions decreased markedly from 2016 through 2020 with declines evident in all of the demographic and military subgroups examined.5

This snapshot summarizes the total numbers of inpatient and outpatient encounters with an OA or spondylosis diagnosis in the first diagnostic position and the total numbers of unique individuals affected by these conditions during the same 5-year surveillance period. Totals included both incident and prevalent cases. Among active component service members during 2016–2020, a total of 71,338 unique individuals were affected by OA (Table). These individuals contributed a total of 211,607 OA-related medical encounters, representing an average of 3 medical encounters per affected individual. The vast majority (99.9%) of the total OA-related medical encounters were in outpatient settings. Service members affected by OA who had 1 or more OA-related hospitalizations (n=276) were associated with a total of 1,409 hospital bed days.

Between 2016 and 2020, a total of 86,485 unique individuals were affected by spondylosis (Table). These individuals had a total of 335,693 spondylosis-related medical encounters, representing 4 medical encounters per affected individual. Similar to OA, the vast majority (99.8%) of the total spondylosis-related medical encounters were in outpatient settings. Spondylosis-related hospitalizations (n=790) accounted for a total of 2,482 hospital bed days.

References

1. Abramoff B, Caldera FE. Osteoarthritis: Pathology, diagnosis, and treatment options. Med Clin North Am. 2020;104(2):293–311.

2. Vina ER, Kwoh CK. Epidemiology of osteoarthritis: Literature update. Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2018;30(2):160-167.

3. Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division. Absolute and relative morbidity burdens attributable to various illnesses and injuries, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020. MSMR. 2021;28(5):2–9.

4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis and arthritis-attributable activity limitation United States, 2010–2012. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2013;62(44):869–873.

5. Williams VF, Ying S, Stahlman S. Update: Osteoarthritis and spondylosis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016–2020. MSMR. 2021;28(12):2–13.

TABLE. Counts of medical encounters(a) with first-listed osteoarthritis or spondylosis diagnoses and unique individuals affected(b), by encounter type, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016–2020

You also may be interested in...

Surveillance Snapshot: Lengths of Hospital Stays for Service Members Diagnosed with Sepsis, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2011–2020

Article
1/1/2022
The (left to right) Senior Airman Austin Shrewsbury, 88th Diagnostics and Therapeutic Squadron medical laboratory technician, works with student, Airman 1st Class Taylor Altman, 88th Diagnostics and Therapeutic Squadron medical laboratory technician, to identify bacteria of patient’s cultures inside the microbiology laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base medical center June 30, 2017.

Sepsis is a serious and life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. In the U.S., sepsis is a leading cause of in-hospital mortality and 1 of the most expensive conditions treated in U.S. hospitals.

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Description of a COVID-19 Beta Variant Outbreak, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, WA, February–March 2021

Article
1/1/2022
U.S. Army Soldiers from 1-17th Infantry Battalion, 2nd Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, clear an objective during the training exercise Bayonet Focus 19-02 at Yakima Training Center, Wash., May 6, 2019. Bayonet Focus is a training exercise designed to assess Soldiers’ ability to preform tasks and complete objectives under conditions experienced during combat situations. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Angel Ruszkiewicz)

This report describes an outbreak of SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19, that peaked during 21–26 February 2021 and was tied to a single military training event. A total of 143 laboratory-confirmed cases were identified.

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

COVID-19 and Depressive Symptoms Among Active Component U.S. Service Members, January 2019–July 2021

Article
1/1/2022
With the holiday season upon us, the cold, dark days that winter brings, and the social distancing and movement restrictions brought about by COVID-19, it’s not uncommon for people to feel depressed. (Photo by Erin Bolling)

This study examined the rates of depressive symptoms in active component U.S. service members prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic and evaluated whether SARS-CoV-2 test results (positive or negative) were associated with self-reported depressive symptoms.

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Update: Osteoarthritis and Spondylosis, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016–2020

Article
12/1/2021
Osteoarthritis (OA) knee . film x-ray AP ( anterior - posterior ) and lateral view of knee show narrow joint space, osteophyte ( spur ), subchondral sclerosis, knee joint inflammation. Photo by: iStockPhoto

Osteoarthritis (OA), the most com­mon adult joint disease, is primarily a degenerative disorder of the entire joint organ, including the subchondral bone, synovium, and periarticular structures (e.g., tendons, ligaments, bursae). Spondylosis, often referred to as OA of the spine, is characterized by degenerative changes in the vertebral discs, joints, and vertebral bodies.

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Surveillance Snapshot: Donovanosis Among Active Component Service Members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2011–2020

Article
12/1/2021
This photomicrograph of a tissue sample extracted from a lesion in the inguinal region of the female granuloma inguinale, or Donovanosis patient, depicted in PHIL 6431, revealed a white blood cell (WBC) that contained the pathognomonic finding of Donovan bodies, which were encapsulated, Gram-negative rods, representing the responsible bacterium Klebsiella granulomatis, formerly known as Calymmatobacterium granulomatis. Photo credit: CDC/ Susan Lindsley

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Incident COVID-19 Infections, Active and Reserve Components, Jan. 1, 2020–Aug. 31, 2021

Article
12/1/2021
U.S. Marines with Marine Rotational Force - Darwin receive a second COVID-19 test during quarantine on Royal Australian Air Force Base Darwin in Darwin, NT, Australia, June 12, 2020. The COVID-19 test was administered to each Marine after arriving from California. All Marines will be quarantined for 14 days and undergo an additional test before quarantine release. No Marines tested positive for COVID-19. The U.S. Marine Corps and Australian Defence Force service members are working together to ensure the safety of the local community. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Natalie Greenwood)

Incident COVID-19 Infections, Active and Reserve Components, 1 January 2020–31 August 2021

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Update: Plant Dermatitis Among Active Component Service Members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2010–2020

Article
11/1/2021
Poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans)

Plant dermatitis is an allergic inflammatory skin reaction in response to the oils of poisonous plants. In the U.S., the most common dermatitis-causing plant genus is the Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus). Approximately 50%–75% of the U.S. adult population are susceptible to skin reactions upon exposure to Toxicodendron oil or oleoresin, called urushiol.

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Sepsis Hospitalizations Among Active Component Service Members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2011–2020

Article
11/1/2021
SAN DIEGO (Oct. 19, 2020) Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Brittni Porter, a laboratory technician assigned to Naval Medical Center San Diego’s (NMCSD) microbiology laboratory, exams agar slides during a drug susceptibility tests Oct. 19. Drug susceptibility tests are conducted to see if a particular antibiotic will react with a patient’s sample on an agar slide. NMCSD’s mission is to prepare service members to deploy in support of operational forces, deliver high quality healthcare services and shape the future of military medicine through education, training and research. NMCSD employs more than 6,000 active duty military personnel, civilians, and contractors in Southern California to provide patients with world-class care anytime, anywhere. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jake Greenberg)

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Brief Report: Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Infections in U.S. Air Force Basic Military Trainees Who Donated Blood, 2017–2020

Article
11/1/2021
U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Brandon Sousa, 424th Engineer Vertical Construction Company, donates blood to the 379th Expeditionary Medical Group’s Blood Support Center, Aug. 30, 2021, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The blood support center conducted a walking blood bank to collect blood from prescreened and cleared donors. The blood was sent downrange to support Afghanistan evacuation operations. The DoD is committed to supporting the U.S. State Department in the departure of U.S. and allied civilian personnel from Afghanistan, and to evacuate Afghan allies to safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kylie Barrow)

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Surveillance Snapshot: Influenza Immunization Among U.S. Armed Forces Health Care Workers, August 2016–April 2021

Article
10/1/2021
Staff Sgt. James H. Wagner, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, vaccinates Maj. Gen. M. Ted Wong, commanding general, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, with the seasonal flu vaccines.

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Surveillance Snapshot: History of COVID-19 Vaccination Among Air Force Recruits Arriving at Basic Training, March 2–June 15, 2021

Article
10/1/2021
COVID-19 vaccine bottle and syringes

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Update: Cold Weather Injuries, Active and Reserve Components, U.S. Armed Forces, July 2016–June 2020

Article
10/1/2021
A student in the army participates in a cold-water immersion training

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Brief Report: The Challenge of Interpreting Repeated Positive Tests for SARS-CoV-2 Among Military Service Members, Fort Jackson, SC, 2020–2021

Article
10/1/2021
Gloved hand holding an example of a negative rapid test for the SARS-CoV-2 virus (COVID-19).

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Update: Routine Screening for Antibodies to Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Civilian Applicants for U.S. Military Service and U.S. Armed Forces, Active and Reserve Components, January 2016–June 2021

Article
9/1/2021
HIV Awareness graphic showing test tubes with HIV + and HIV - labels

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Is Suicide a Social Phenomenon during the COVID-19 Pandemic? Differences by Birth Cohort on Suicide Among Active Component Army Soldiers, Jan.1, 2000–June 4, 2021

Article
9/1/2021
Spc. Brittney VerBerkmoes speaks among fellow Soldiers in a group centered on finding a way for the Army to mitigate the amount of suicides that occurs among Soldiers.

Is Suicide a Social Phenomenon during the COVID-19 Pandemic? Differences by Birth Cohort on Suicide Among Active Component Army Soldiers, 1 January 2000–4 June 2021

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 16 - 30 Page 2 of 12
Refine your search
Last Updated: May 10, 2022

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.