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Articles by Ask the Doc Team

Ask the Doc: Am I Running Too Much?

Article
10/21/2021
Marine Corps recruits run in formation

Doc talks to Navy Lt. Cmdr. Aaron Stoll, a physical therapist at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, about the causes and cures for pain resulting from running.

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Pain Management | Physical Fitness | Ask The Doc

Ask the Doc: I've Got a Friend I'm Worried About – What Should I Do?

Article
9/15/2021
Soldiers conduct a ruck march on airfield.

Doc talks to Dr. Tim Hoyt, chief of Psychological Health Promotion and supervisor of the Combat and Operational Stress Control mission at the Psychological Health Center of Excellence, about some of the ways to go about addressing your concerns with a friend you may think is in danger of harming themself.

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Psychological Health Center of Excellence | Suicide Prevention | Ask The Doc

Ask the Doc: How Do I Fight the Long Deployment Blues?

Article
9/7/2021
Military personnel looking at a computer

Doc talks to Navy Lt. Chad Haan, staff chaplain at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Virginia, about ways to prevent a “downward spiral” while on deployment.

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Psychological Fitness | Social Fitness | Ask The Doc

Ask the Doc: AO2 Energy

Article
7/26/2021
AO2

Dear Doc: Me and the guys in my shop drink A LOT of caffeine. I'm not much of a coffee guy, but I do drink two or three energy drinks a day. I drink a lot of water too, and I'm young and in good shape, but sometimes I feel like I'm a little too reliant on these drinks. I sometimes short myself on sleep only because I know I can have an energy drink or two and be fine for most of the day. Is that a problem? Should I cut back? What are the impacts on my health? Are some forms of caffeine (coffee or tea, for example) better or safer than others? I'd rather focus on this while I'm young and healthy instead of keeping it up for a decade before I realize it's caused a real health problem. -AO2 Energy

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Nutritional Fitness | Ask The Doc

Ask the Doc: Eye Need Answers

Article
7/8/2021
Senior Airman Mitchel Delfosse, 22nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron electrical environmental system journeyman, attends an eye exam appointment Jan. 30, 2020, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas. Maj. (Dr.) Gerardo Robles-Morales, 22nd Operational Medical Readiness Squadron optometry flight commander, recommends an eye exam a minimum of every two years to ensure overall eye health and correct vision. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Bosarge)

Dear Doc: I consider myself pretty lucky. I'm in my late 20s and I've never had any eye problems to speak of. I have 20/20 vision and I've never worn glasses. But...the Air Force tells me to protect my eyes and I'm not exactly sure what that means. Do you know anyone who can give me some solid advice on the best options for eye protection? What should I be wearing at work or on the flight line? What should I be wearing out in the sun? I know I have a lot of questions, but I just want to protect myself as best as possible. Thanks in advance, Doc! -Eye Need Answers

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Vision and Hearing Loss Prevention | Ask The Doc

Ask the Doc: Senior NCO in the Know

Article
6/15/2021
Lt. Cmdr. David Griffin, a urologist at Naval Hospital Pensacola, discusses a treatment plan with a patient in the Urology Clinic. Some of the common conditions seen at the clinic include male infertility, sexual health, kidney stones, urinary tract infections, urologic cancers, blood in the urine, urinary problems, vasectomies and more.

Dear Doc: As I progress through my 40s, I'd like to think I've lived a pretty healthy life to this point. As a service member, I've kept myself in shape, ate well and always listened to my body throughout my career. Unfortunately, I can't say as much for some other members of my peer group. I know we are trained to be "warriors," and a lot of us feel that if we aren't self-sufficient, it may somehow make us less efficient as soldiers, sailors, airmen or Marines. I can't help but feel like there's a stigma associated with monitoring yourself or furthermore, getting help, especially among men and issues related specifically to men's health. My question is, how can I convince these guys that there is nothing wrong or "weak" about getting help with health issues, male-specific or otherwise? - Senior NCO in the Know

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Men's Health | Ask The Doc

Ask the Doc: Fitness Freaking Out

Article
5/26/2021
Integrating healthy snacks like fruit into kid’s diets will teach them healthy eating habits. September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness month. (U.S. Air Force photo by Sabrina Fine)

Dear Doc: It seems like every time I go to the commissary, my daughter, 6, and son, 7, tend to gravitate toward the sugary cereals and frozen pizzas, and always want candy bars and sodas at the checkout. As far as I know, and as has been proven by their regularly scheduled check-ups, they are both in great health. The mother in me wants to give them what they want, but the former college athlete and current fitness freak in me is afraid that this might become a problem. For me, eating healthy has become a normal part of my life, and I've come to enjoy things that are healthy and taste good. Aside from tricking them, what can I do to get my kids to eat (and enjoy) more healthy foods? — Fitness Freaking Out

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Physical Fitness | Nutritional Fitness | Ask The Doc

Ask the Doc: COVID Courageous

Article
5/10/2021
Spc. Andrew Buchtan, 1-4 Infantry Regiment medic, vaccinates Command Sgt. Maj. Deondre Long, Battalion Command Sergeant Major of 1-4 Infantry Regiment. Long said “I got the vaccination shot today because I did not want my leadership style to change. I am an engaged leader. The shot will enable me to develop a better relationship with my soldiers. It will help better interact with them without a standoffish leadership.” (US Army photo by Sgt. Julian Padua).

Dear Doc: I was afraid about getting my COVID vaccine at first and even entertained the thought of not getting it at all, but now that most of my friends and coworkers have gotten their first dose and some have even gotten their second, I think I'm ready. It seems pretty safe. That being said, now I need to know what I'm supposed to do to get it done. My wife wants to get hers as well but isn't sure how to go about doing it as a dependent. Is there a difference? Are there different ways of getting an appointment? What do we have to do? Any help would be much appreciated. — COVID Courageous

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COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | Ask The Doc

Ask the Doc Seeking: Advice on Advice

Article
5/6/2021
FORT CARSON, Colo. — Janie Frey, left, from the Family Care Ward, and Teressa Harris, right, both registered nurses at Evans Army Community Hospital, from the Intensive Care Unit, answer phone calls Aug. 5 from the COVID-19 patient advice line.

Dear Doc: I've heard about something called the Nurse Advice Line, but don't know anything else about it. During the height of COVID-19, there were a few times I probably should have talked to someone about things like headaches, body pain, and allergies, but I didn't know if it required a trip to my military medical treatment facility during a pandemic (and honestly don't know if I would have gone during "normal" times). Usually, I just let whatever it is subside, but it would be nice to have someone to talk to and get advice on things that might not necessarily be worth coming in for...or maybe figuring out if I should, depending on the severity. So, I guess I'm asking – what is the Nurse Advice Line, what can it be used for, and how can I find out more information about it? Thanks in advance. - Seeking Advice on Advice

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Ask The Doc

Ask the Doc: My Nose Knows

Article
4/15/2021
Many people suffer from season allergies.

Dear Doc: I suffer from horrible allergies every year and I've just changed duty stations to an area that I've been told is especially bad for them in the spring. I've tried over-the-counter meds for years and nothing seems to work. With things starting to bloom, I'm almost afraid to go outside. How can I keep my allergies in check and make sure I can finally enjoy the warm weather in the next few months? — My Nose Knows (and so do my eyes and throat)

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Environmental Fitness | Ask The Doc

Ask the Doc: Hit Head Hiking

Article
3/17/2021
U.S. Marines with The Basic School, Headquarter and Service Battalion, hike Old Rag Mountain at the Shenandoah National Park, Madison County, Va., Nov. 7, 2018. The motivational hike was held in honor of the Marine Corps Birthday as well as Veterans’ Day. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Quinn Hurt)

Dear Doc: I decided to take advantage of the beautiful weather last weekend and went out hiking with a few friends. As we were headed up a pretty steep incline, I fell and hit my head on a rock. It hurt pretty badly at the time, but being the “warrior” that I am, I brushed it off and we finished the hike. I haven’t been to a doctor yet, but now I'm having pretty painful headaches, and I’ve also been getting dizzy and nauseous. Did I have a concussion and, if so, what should I do next? — Hit Head Hiking

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Traumatic Brain Injury | Ask The Doc

Ask the Doc: Trying to Be Heart Smart

Article
2/15/2021
Snow covers the trees around J. Edward Roush Lake, Huntington, Ind.

Dear Doc: I can’t speak for everyone, but I know where I live, we’ve still got a month or so of extreme cold weather left. Following the advice from your last column, I’m pushing through with my outdoor workouts. While I am staying warm, I’ve noticed that I get tired quicker than I would when it’s warm outside. I’ve also heard that your heart must work harder when you’re working out outside during the winter. How can I make sure I’m not risking my heart health to keep up my routine? –-Trying to be Heart Smart

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Winter Safety | Heart Health | Ask The Doc

Ask the Doc: Working out in a Winter Wonderland

Article
1/20/2021
A Soldier assigned to 10th Combat Aviation Brigade spends part of his lunch break getting a quick workout on the ice. So far, 2021 has seen the type of North Country winter weather that is making the Fort Drum ice rink a hot spot for outdoor recreation. Since the rink opened on Jan. 25, it has seen more activity in the first 10 days than all of last season with nearly 800 skaters in attendance. (Photo by Mike Strasser, Fort Drum Garrison Public Affairs)

Dear Doc: Although my gym has opened back up, I’m still a little hesitant to return because of the recent spikes in COVID cases in my area. I’ve been getting creative with my home workouts, and I’d really like to be outside more, but it’s so cold! I want to bundle up, but I don’t want to overdo it and get overheated. Do you have any recommendations for dressing for outdoor workouts in the winter? –Working Out in a Winter Wonderland

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Physical Fitness | Winter Safety | Ask The Doc
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