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The Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the cause of Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and has had major impacts on the health of populations and on healthcare systems worldwide. This infographic provides an update on routine screening for antibodies to HIV among civilian applicants for the U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces during a January 2011 - June 2016 surveillance period.  Since October 1985, the U.S. military has conducted routine screening for antibodies to HIV-1 to enable adequate and timely medical evaluations, treatment and counseling; to prevent unwitting transmission; and protect the battlefield blood supply. From January 2015 through June 2016, 463,132 civilian applicants for U.S. military service were tested. 124 were identified as HIV antibody positive. During 2015, one was detected with antibodies to HIV per 3,267 screening tests. Annual seroprevalences peaked in 2015, up 29% from 2014. The seroprevalences were much higher among males than females and among black, non-Hispanics than other race/ethnicity groups. Seroprevalences decreased by approximately 26% among male applicants, dropped to zero among female applicants, and decreased by 43% among black, non-Hispanic applicants.  As for the active component of the U.S. Army, 548,974 soldiers were tested from January 2015 through June 2016. 120 were identified as HIV antibody positive. During 2015, one was detected with antibodies to HIV per 5,265 screening tests. Of the 515 active component soldiers diagnosed with HIV infections since 2011, a total of 291 (57%) were still in military service in 2016. Annual seroprevalences for male active component Army members greatly exceed those of females.  Among active and reserve component service members, seroprevalences continue to be higher among Army and Navy members and males than their respective counterparts. Service members who are infected with HIV receive clinical assessments, treatments, and counseling; they may remain in service as long as they are capable of performing their military duties. Learn more at Health.mil/AFHSB

The Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the cause of Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and has had major impacts on the health of populations and on healthcare systems worldwide. This infographic provides an update on routine screening for antibodies to HIV among civilian applicants for the U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces during a January 2011 - June 2016 surveillance period.

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment

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