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Global Health Engagement

The Department of Defense executes Global Health Engagement or "GHE" activities to establish and improve the capabilities of Partner Nations' military or civilian health sectors, or those of the DoD. 

Global Health Engagement Spotlight

DoD's GHE activities advance operational readiness and protect our troops, build interoperability so we can work more effectively with the armed forces of our partner nations, and enhance security cooperation so DoD can establish and maintain strong relationships around the world.  A key enabler to regional stability and security for DoD's combatant commands, GHE reduces risks to U.S. armed forces while fostering mission capability of partner nations' forces so that together, we can continue working effectively to defend global interests. 

Read more about the DoD's policy for Global Health Engagement

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USNS Mercy returns home following Pacific Partnership 2018

Article
7/24/2018
Navy Hospital Corpsman Tianna Garcia, assigned to Naval Medical Center San Diego, is greeted by her husband Aaron Garcia during the homecoming ceremony for the hospital ship USNS Mercy. The ship and her crew completed a five-month humanitarian relief mission to Southeast Asia. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Indra Beaufort)

Pacific Partnership 2018 included more than 800 military and civilian personnel from the U.S., Australia, Canada, France, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and the United Kingdom

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Civil Military Medicine | Civil Support | Global Health Engagement | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief | Global Health Engagement

U.S. Navy, JMSDF participate in bilateral training exercise

Article
6/21/2018
Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Sailors and U.S. Naval Hospital (USNH) Yokosuka personnel transport a simulated patient during a mass casualty drill in conjunction with hospital ship USNS Mercy and JMSDF personnel. The drill was conducted in order to prepare medical staff for a mass casualty scenario involving a maritime incident at sea. USNH Yokosuka is the largest U.S. military treatment facility on mainland Japan caring for approximately 43,000 eligible beneficiaries. (U.S. Navy photo by Tim Jensen)

The simulated disaster for the training exercise included a Japanese vessel colliding with a U.S. vessel

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Global Health Engagement | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief | Global Health Engagement

2019 to 2021 GEIS Strategy

Report
6/15/2018

This Strategy describes how GEIS will support infectious disease surveillance and outbreak response to enhance FHP decision making in the future operating environment. GEIS will achieve this end state through direct support to the six Geographic Combatant Commands (GCC) and the global DoD laboratory network that operates in all of their areas of operation to provide early detection, prevention and response to infectious disease threats of military relevance.

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Global Emerging Infections Surveillance

Military doctors conduct infectious diseases training in Panama

Article
6/13/2018
Publio Gonzalez, a biologist with the Gorgas Institute, holds a bat in Meteti, Panama. Gonzalez and U.S. military doctors were participating in infectious diseases training, in which they received informational lectures from Panamanian infectious disease experts and field studies of possible virus-carrying wildlife and insects. The event took place during Exercise New Horizons 2018, which is a joint training exercise where U.S. military members conduct training in civil engineer, medical and support services while benefiting the local community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen)

Due to the geographic location of Panama, the importance the country places on controlling diseases greatly benefits the Unites States

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Global Health Engagement | Global Health Engagement

2018 Medical Support Operations Conference

Photo
4/11/2018
Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery spoke at the 2018 Medical Support Operations Conference in London, delivering remarks on the defense sector's role in advancing the Global Health Security Agenda. A partnership of more than 60 nations, the Global Health Security Agenda, or GHSA, brings together the unique roles of governments, industry, NGOs, academia, and international institutions to combat infectious disease threats. “We are up against a perilous rise in infectious disease outbreaks threatening the health and safety of our citizens, as well as threatening geopolitical stability,” stated McCaffery, emphasizing that global health security is an essential part of our national security. “The bottom line is that defense and security sectors have a real opportunity to use the GHSA framework to increase collaboration and converge our unique assets across all sectors to detect and defeat disease at the earliest possible moment," McCaffery said.

Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery spoke at the 2018 Medical Support Operations Conference in London, delivering remarks on the defense sector's role in advancing the Global Health Security Agenda. A partnership of more than 60 nations, the Global Health Security Agenda, or GHSA, brings together the unique roles of governments, industry, NGOs, academia, and international institutions to combat infectious disease threats. “We are up against a perilous rise in infectious disease outbreaks threatening the health and safety of our citizens, as well as threatening geopolitical stability,” stated McCaffery, emphasizing that global health security is an essential part of our national security. “The bottom line is that defense and security sectors have a real opportunity to use the GHSA framework to increase collaboration and converge our unique assets across all sectors to detect and defeat disease at the earliest possible moment," McCaffery said.

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Global Health Engagement

2018 Visit to U.S. Africa Command's Command Surgeon

Photo
4/11/2018
Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery visits U.S. Africa Command's Command Surgeon and team to discuss the strategic context of global health in advancing shared security objectives with partner nations across the region.  The Department of Defense recognizes that Global Health Engagement activities play a key role to advance U.S. troop operational readiness, build interoperability, and enhance Security Cooperation.

Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery visits U.S. Africa Command's Command Surgeon and team to discuss the strategic context of global health in advancing shared security objectives with partner nations across the region. The Department of Defense recognizes that Global Health Engagement activities play a key role to advance U.S. troop operational readiness, build interoperability, and enhance Security Cooperation.

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Global Health Engagement | Global Health Engagement

Mercy 2018 Atoll2

Photo
3/21/2018
Sailors transport a mock patient from an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter, attached to the “Wildcards” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 23, to the triage center during a mass casualty integrated field exercise aboard the hospital ship USNS Mercy during Pacific Partnership 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 2nd Class Kelsey L. Adams)

Sailors transport a mock patient from an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter, attached to the “Wildcards” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 23, to the triage center during a mass casualty integrated field exercise aboard the hospital ship USNS Mercy during Pacific Partnership 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 2nd Class Kelsey L. Adams)

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Global Health Engagement

Department of Defense Global, Laboratory-based Influenza Surveillance Program’s Influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates and surveillance trends, 2016 – 2017 Influenza Season

Infographic
2/5/2018
Each year, the Department of Defense (DoD) Global, Laboratory-based Influenza Surveillance Program performs surveillance for influenza among service members of the DoD and their dependent family members. In addition to routine surveillance, vaccine effectiveness (VE) studies are performed and results are shared with the Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Health Organization for vaccine evaluation. This report documents the annual surveillance trends for the 2016 – 2017 influenza season and the end-of-season VE results. The analysis was performed by the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Epidemiology Laboratory, and the DoD Influenza Surveillance Program staff at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH. FINDINGS: A total of 5,555 specimens were tested from 84 locations: •	2,486 (44.7%) negative •	1,382 (24.9%) influenza A •	1,093 (19.7%) other respiratory pathogens •	443 (8.0%) influenza B •	151 (2.7%) co-infections The predominant influenza strain was A (H3N2), representing 73.8% of all circulating influenza. Pie chart displays this information. Graph showing the numbers and percentages of respiratory specimens positive for influenza viruses, and numbers of influenza viruses identified, by type, by surveillance week, Department of Defense healthcare beneficiaries, 2016 – 2017 influenza season displays. The vaccine effectiveness (VE) for this season was slightly lower than for the 2015 – 2016 season, which had a 63% (95% confidence interval: 53% - 71%) adjusted VE. The adjusted VE for the 2016 – 2017 season was 48% protective against all types of influenza.  Access the full report in the January 2018 MSMR (Vol. 25, No. 1). Go to: www.Health.mil/MSMR

This infographic documents the annual surveillance trends for the 2016 – 2017 influenza season and the end-of-season vaccine effectiveness.

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Global respiratory surveillance program detects dangerous pathogens to keep armed forces healthy

Article
12/21/2017
Data from the Department of Defense Global Respiratory Pathogen Surveillance Program are presented to the Food and Drug Administration's annual Vaccine and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee meeting to help inform the vaccine strain in the U.S. for the upcoming season that is administered to U.S. Armed Forces for health protection and readiness. (Photo Courtesy of  Defense Imagery Management Operations Center)

To reduce the impact of respiratory pathogens on service members, the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch coordinates a global respiratory surveillance program for the military. Learn how the program detects dangerous pathogens to keep armed forces healthy.

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U.S. Military HIV Research Program

Fact Sheet
12/8/2017

The U.S. Military HIV Research Program (MHRP) is at the forefront of the battle against HIV to protect U.S. troops from infection and to reduce the global impact of the disease.

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Increasing Partner-Nation Capacity Through Global Health Engagement

Publication
12/6/2017

GHE operations, activities, and actions (OAA) are used to implement the Secretary of Defense Policy Guidance for DoD GHE and the U.S. Army Medicine 2017 Campaign Plan in direct support of the U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM) theater campaign plan (TCP) and U.S. Army Pacific (USARPAC) theater campaign support plan.

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Global Health Engagement | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability

Trauma Care in Support of Global Military Operations

Publication
12/6/2017

The Department of Defense (DoD) Joint Trauma System (JTS) revolutionized combat casualty care by creating a trauma system for the battlefield.

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AFHSB's health surveillance program supports Defense Department global health engagement efforts

Article
11/30/2017
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Douglass, left, an aerospace medical technician, watches as Liberian health care workers properly put on their personal protective equipment as part response by the Defense Department operation to provide logistics, training and engineering support during the Ebola virus outbreak. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Terrance D. Rhodes)

Navy Commander Franca R. Jones, chief of the Global Emerging Infections section at the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) discusses how AFHSB's health surveillance program supports the Defense Department global health engagement efforts.

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U.S. Department of Defense Continued Support to the Global Health Security Agenda: Updates from Korea

Article
11/29/2017
Left to right: LTC Seungwoo Park, Republic of Korea MND, MG Ben Yura Rimba, Indonesia TNI, and Dr. J. Christopher Daniel, U.S. DoD.

In late July, the Global Health Security Agenda (link is external) (GHSA) Steering Group (link is external), chaired by the Republic of Korea, convened in Seoul to discuss ongoing implementation of the GHSA (link is external)

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DoD Medical Professionals Engage with Partner Nations in Singapore during APMHE 2017

Article
11/29/2017
Global Health Engagement

Medical professionals and leaders from across the Department of Defense engaged with partner nation colleagues while participating in the Asia Pacific Military Health Exchange 17 (APMHE) in Singapore May 23-26.

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Global Health Engagement
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