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Global Health Engagement

The Department of Defense executes Global Health Engagement or "GHE" activities to establish and improve the capabilities of Partner Nations' military or civilian health sectors, or those of the DoD. 

Global Health Engagement Spotlight

DoD's GHE activities advance operational readiness and protect our troops, build interoperability so we can work more effectively with the armed forces of our partner nations, and enhance security cooperation so DoD can establish and maintain strong relationships around the world.  A key enabler to regional stability and security for DoD's combatant commands, GHE reduces risks to U.S. armed forces while fostering mission capability of partner nations' forces so that together, we can continue working effectively to defend global interests. 

Read more about the DoD's policy for Global Health Engagement

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U.S. Military HIV Research Program

Fact Sheet
12/8/2017

The U.S. Military HIV Research Program (MHRP) is at the forefront of the battle against HIV to protect U.S. troops from infection and to reduce the global impact of the disease.

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Global Health Engagement | HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment

Trauma Care in Support of Global Military Operations

Publication
12/6/2017

The Department of Defense (DoD) Joint Trauma System (JTS) revolutionized combat casualty care by creating a trauma system for the battlefield.

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Global Health Engagement | Force Health Protection

Increasing Partner-Nation Capacity Through Global Health Engagement

Publication
12/6/2017

GHE operations, activities, and actions (OAA) are used to implement the Secretary of Defense Policy Guidance for DoD GHE and the U.S. Army Medicine 2017 Campaign Plan in direct support of the U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM) theater campaign plan (TCP) and U.S. Army Pacific (USARPAC) theater campaign support plan.

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Global Health Engagement | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability

Navy doctors bring medical care to the Amazon

Article
12/5/2017
U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Nehkonti Adams, an infectious diseases specialist, left, and U.S. Navy Lt. Gregory Condos, an internal medicine specialist, middle, work with 2nd Lt. Raissa Vieira Sanchez, a Brazilian medical officer, right, to diagnose an elderly woman on her houseboat near a remote village along the Amazon River in Brazil. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Andrew Brame)

U.S. Navy doctors recently embarked aboard a Brazilian Navy hospital ship and began a month-long humanitarian mission that will take them deep into the Amazon

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Global Health Engagement | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability

U.S., Brazilian Doctors Partner to Bring Medical Care to Amazon

Article
12/5/2017
AMAZON RIVER, Brazil (Nov. 21, 2017) Lt. Cmdr. Nehkonti Adams, an infectious diseases specialist, works with 2nd Lt. Raissa Vieira Sanchez, a Brazilian medical officer, to diagnose a small boy from a remote village along the Amazon River in Brazil, November 21. Adams is part of a team of five U.S. Navy doctors who are engaging in a month-long humanitarian mission up the Amazon River. The team is working with the Brazilian Navy to deliver healthcare to some of the most isolated people in the world. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Andrew Brame/Released)

Five Navy doctors recently boarded the Brazilian navy hospital ship NAsH Soares de Meirelles and began a monthlong humanitarian mission that will take them deep into the Amazon. These doctors will be working closely with the Brazilian navy to deliver healthcare to some of the isolated peoples in the world.

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Global Health Engagement

CGHE: A look back at an eventful year

Article
12/1/2017
Navy Capt. (Dr.) Jamie Reeves (left) and Air Force Major (Dr.) Geoff Oravec (center, right), of the Uniformed Services University's Center for Global Health Engagement participated in Exercise RIMPAC 2016 with Captain Sun Tao, head of the medical element of the Chinese hospital ship Peace Ark. During the exercise, CGHE delivered its Fundamentals for Global Health Engagement course, which brought together about 30 Chinese Navy medical officers with medical officers from Australia, Canada, and the US Navy.  (Uniformed Services University photo)

This year has been an exceptional one at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences’ (USU) Center for Global Health Engagement (CGHE).

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Global Health Engagement

Leaders discuss global health collaboration as powerful tool

Article
11/30/2017
At an AMSUS session, Dr. Terry Rauch describes how global health activities help facilitate readiness, security and international collaboration. (Courtesy photo)

Military health exchanges build trust, confidence and security over time

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Global Health Engagement | Force Health Protection | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability

AFHSB's health surveillance program supports Defense Department global health engagement efforts

Article
11/30/2017
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Douglass, left, an aerospace medical technician, watches as Liberian health care workers properly put on their personal protective equipment as part response by the Defense Department operation to provide logistics, training and engineering support during the Ebola virus outbreak. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Terrance D. Rhodes)

Navy Commander Franca R. Jones, chief of the Global Emerging Infections section at the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) discusses how AFHSB's health surveillance program supports the Defense Department global health engagement efforts.

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Global Emerging Infections Surveillance | Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Surveillance | Febrile and Vector-Borne Infections (FVBI) Surveillance | Enteric Infections (EI) Surveillance | GEIS Partners | Global Health Engagement

DoD's international HIV/AIDS prevention program saves lives, builds lasting relationships

Article
11/30/2017
Air Force Capt. Crystal Karahan, U.S. Air Forces in Europe, Air Forces Africa international health specialist, talks to Cameroonian nursing students during a clean site delivery workshop in Douala, Cameroon. (Courtesy photo)

MHS honors World AIDS Day December 1

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U.S. Department of Defense Continued Support to the Global Health Security Agenda: Updates from Korea

Article
11/29/2017
Left to right: LTC Seungwoo Park, Republic of Korea MND, MG Ben Yura Rimba, Indonesia TNI, and Dr. J. Christopher Daniel, U.S. DoD.

In late July, the Global Health Security Agenda (link is external) (GHSA) Steering Group (link is external), chaired by the Republic of Korea, convened in Seoul to discuss ongoing implementation of the GHSA (link is external)

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Global Health Security Agenda

DoD Medical Professionals Engage with Partner Nations in Singapore during APMHE 2017

Article
11/29/2017
Global Health Engagement

Medical professionals and leaders from across the Department of Defense engaged with partner nation colleagues while participating in the Asia Pacific Military Health Exchange 17 (APMHE) in Singapore May 23-26.

Strengthening capabilities, fostering partnership top priorities at global health summit

Article
10/27/2017
Admiral Tim Ziemer, head of U.S. delegation, giving remarks at the Global Health Security Agenda Ministerial Meeting in Kampala, Uganda.

A growing partnership of more than 60 nations is working to build countries’ capacity to help create a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats and elevate global health security

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Review of the U.S. Military’s Human Immunodeficiency Virus program: A legacy of the progress and a future of promise

Infographic
10/3/2017
HIV infection is a threat of the Department of Defense (DoD) because sexually active service members and their beneficiaries are stationed throughout the U.S. and around the globe, including in areas with high rates of HIV transmission. Fortunately, blood testing and a negative test result for HIV infection are required for entry into military service. All U.S. military service members must undergo testing for HIV infection every 2 years. As a result, the incidence and prevalence of HIV in the DoD remains much lower than in the U.S. civilian population.

This infographic documents the incidence and prevalence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among service members, active and reserve components, of the U.S. Armed Forces, 1990 – 2017.

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HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch

DoD Instruction 2000.30: Global Health Engagement Activities

Policy

This instruction establishes policy, assigns responsibilities, and prescribes procedures for the conduct of global health engagement activities with partner nation (PN) entities.

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