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Military Health System

When, If Ever, Should Military Physicians Violate a Military Order to Give Medical Obligations Higher Priority?

Publication Status: Published

Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)

Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences

Congressionally Mandated: No

Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)

Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2015

Principle Investigator Status: Government

Primary DoD Data Source: Other

Secondary DoD Data Source:

Abstract

Military care providers may face ethical conflicts when they must treat their own and enemy soldiers during combat and their resources are limited. Legally under the Geneva Convention, they are instructed to treat enemy soldiers equally, but in practice, providers still have some discretion. This article discusses this discretion and ethical frameworks and uncertainties that bear on these decisions. A case is presented in which this conflict arose. How the provider resolved this is reported.

Citation:

Howe EG. When, If Ever, Should Military Physicians Violate a Military Order to Give Medical Obligations Higher Priority? Mil Med. 2015 Nov;180(11):1118-9. ;180(11):1121-3.

Last Updated: February 21, 2019
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