Skip main navigation

Military Health System

Clear Your Browser Cache

This website has recently undergone changes. Users finding unexpected concerns may care to clear their browser's cache to ensure a seamless experience.

Defense Health Agency Simulation Expo Shows Future of Medicine

Image of Defense Health Agency Simulation Expo Shows Future of Medicine. Donald Johnson, assistant director of support for the Defense Health Agency, applies a tourniquet on a simulation mannequin during a tour for DHA senior leaders at the Medical Simulation Expo at headquarters on Aug. 3, 2023. U.S. Army Col. Maria Molina, director of education and training, DHA, looks on as representatives of TACMED Simulation provide instruction. (Photo: Robert Hammer)

The Defense Health Agency’s Medical Modernization and Simulation Division brought the latest in devices to its Medical Simulation Expo on Aug. 3, 2023, at DHA headquarters in Falls Church, Virginia.

“What I’ve seen today is the future,” said Donald Johnson, DHA’s assistant director of support and component acquisition executive. “Artificial intelligence, simulations, different technologies—I think this is where we have to go. We need to invest in it, we need to pilot it, and bring it to the classroom.”

The expo was open to all DHA and National Capital Region General Services Administration personnel to showcase the latest advancements in the field and collaborate with companies committed to making cutting-edge technologies for the Military Health System.

“This expo continues to be a great opportunity to connect industry partners, foster relationships, and collaborate on ideas,” said U.S. Army Col. Maria Molina, division chief of the MMSD. “We can identify education and training gaps and how we can mitigate those gaps with simulation. It helps us generate new ideas and get our community excited about simulation.”

More than 30 exhibiting companies presented live demos and hands-on training to attendees.

A guided tour for senior leaders kicked off the expo and featured industry personnel presenting technology solutions such as lifelike mannequins for medical training, and demonstrations including how to apply tourniquets, make scalpel cuts, insert needles, suture, and control bleeding. Virtual interactive video simulation for live training was presented, as well as secure wireless access points and platforms powered by artificial intelligence.

Ruben Garza, chief, J7, Defense Medical Modeling & Simulation Office, said, “It’s exciting to see the new technologies developing. When we started the expo, there were plastic mannequins that didn’t do too much. Now, you can take vitals from mannequins, they can talk to you, you can practice tourniquets, or do an IV. It’s been an evolution in how the new technology has increased to meet the mission.”

“I think the biggest change I saw from last year was AI,” said Molina. “Seeing what AI is doing to transform the way that we train our students is really big. We’re going see a huge shift in the next three to five years.”

Putting cutting-edge medical simulation technology in front of leaders was a primary motivation. “We want them to have more understanding of simulation,” said Garza.

“We talk about education, training, and medical simulation with our leaders,” said Molina. “We talk about why we need it, and its importance. But giving them the visual of new technology, what's on the horizon, and what we can actually do with this technology helps a lot.”

According to Garza, using simulation technology to fill gaps is an important next step.

“How do we bring the training modalities to hospitals and clinics so they can get those repetitions, and movements?” said Garza.

For Garza, the expo was a step forward in the process of modernizing, standardizing, and centralizing medical simulation.

“We modernized to better fit the mission,” said Garza. “We standardized, so that if one facility can use it, another one can also use it. We also centralized … we can help a unit figure out what they need. That’s awesome. That's the exciting part.”

You also may be interested in...

Article Around MHS
Mar 30, 2023

Protecting the Warfighter's Health and Readiness, Now and Into the Future

An anopheles mosquito specimen sample sits under the microscope during a demonstration of the U.S. Army’s medical technology development and modernization efforts, Fort Detrick, Maryland, on Feb. 23. (Photo by Summer Abdoh, U.S. Army)

A cure for a debilitating and sometimes deadly disease, new treatments for working military dogs, a snakebite antidote, and a treatment for respiratory disease! See how years of research collaborations are providing protections for warfighters in remote places like never before.

Article Around MHS
Mar 17, 2023

USU President Encourages Attendees to “Think Outside the Box” at Infectious Disease Symposium

Uniformed Services University President Dr. Jonathan Woodson delivered opening remarks during IDCRP's first annual Science Symposium March 6-10. The event was held in collaboration with the Defense Health Agency Infectious Disease Working Group Subcommittee. (Photo by  HJF communications)

Infectious diseases like COVID-19, HIV, and battlefield wound infections cause illness and disruptions that threaten health and military readiness around the world. To help foster collaboration in the field and share best practices, the Uniformed Services University’s Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program hosted its first Science Symposium ...

Article Around MHS
Mar 15, 2023

Walter Reed Audiology and Speech Pathology Center Focuses on Improving Quality of Life for Military Health System Beneficiaries

World Hearing Day is observed annually on March 3, and this year’s theme is “Ear and Hearing Care for All.”  (Courtesy photo)

Although World Hearing Day is observed just one day during the year, the Audiology and Speech Pathology Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center focuses on improving the health and quality of life for MHS beneficiaries nearly every day of the year.

Article Around MHS
Jan 25, 2023

U.S. Army Medical Laboratory Forges Relationship with Australian Defence Force Institute

Military personnel in medical laoratory

American soldiers from the 1st Area Medical Laboratory were hosted by their counterparts at the Australian Defence Force Malaria and Infectious Disease Institute in Brisbane, Australia. Find out what was discussed at this meeting to strengthen critical relationships, save lives, and enable both sides' mission readiness.

Skip subpage navigation
Refine your search
Last Updated: September 05, 2023
Follow us on Instagram Follow us on LinkedIn Follow us on Facebook Follow us on X Follow us on YouTube Sign up on GovDelivery