Skip to main content

Military Health System

Important Notice about Pharmacy Operations

Change Healthcare Cyberattack Impact on MHS Pharmacy Operations. Read the statement to learn more. 

DHA’s Mobile Apps Can Help You with Overall Wellness

Image of A smartphone user using the DHA's Air Force MissionFit app. A smartphone user navigates the DHA’s Air Force MissionFit app, at Hanscom Air Force Base in Massachusetts in February 2020. The app offers a 12-week program of exercise routines along with a library of more than 90 exercises and detailed instructions with video, images and text (Photo by: Lauren Russell, 66th Air Base Group Public Affairs).

Psychologists at the Defense Health Agency's Connected Health branch have developed a new mobile app to give frontline health care providers the tools to keep themselves emotionally healthy and productive as they serve our military communities.

Called the Provider Resilience app, it was launched this summer by the DHA's Web & Mobile Technology (WMT) Program Management Office. Connected Health is the branch of the DHA responsible for evaluating and integrating health technology, such as mobile apps, virtual or augmented reality programs, and wearable devices.

"These last 18 months grappling with the pandemic have been really hard for our front-line caregivers," said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Ralph Montgomery, WMT's deputy program manager. "We're so proud to be able to build a resource to help over-burdened providers maintain their mental health."

Many frontline providers face intense demands, sometimes leading to burnout, compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress. The Provider Resilience app uses psychoeducation and self-assessments to give a snapshot of the user's overall resilience rating, along with a countdown clock showing how long until the user's next vacation.

User-specific ratings for compassion fatigue, burnout and secondary traumatic stress are automatically generated, allowing users to monitor their wellness over time. The app also features "stress-busting" and "satisfaction-building" tools while the Military Meditation Coach podcast helps users learn meditation and other contemplation techniques. Physical exercise cards and inspirational quotes help users take a break from daily stress.

Images from the new Provider Resilience app An image from the new Provider Resilience app, which uses psychoeducation and self-assessment tools to help frontline health care providers (Photo by: Defense Health Agency).

Other apps

The DHA has also develop several other wellness and pain management apps can be seen clicking here. A few of them are listed here:

  • Breathe2Relax: This is a portable stress management tool which provides detailed information on the effects of stress on the body. It provides exercises to help with stress management, mood stabilization and anxiety management.
  • Pain and Opioid Safety: This app is for recording and measuring one's pain as well as a resource for information regarding opioids.
  • My Prosperity Plan: A tool to help you specify goals and to develop a plan to reach them with an objective to maximize your potential - personally, professionally, spiritually, and in your relationships.
  • MissionFit: Developed for the Air Force but available to anyone, this app offers a 12-week program of exercise routines along with a library of more than 90 exercises and detailed instructions with video, images and text. Users are guided through routines by navigating workout weeks, days and instructions.
  • Tactical Breather: This app can be used to gain control over physiological and psychological responses to stress. It employs repetitive practice and training toward a goal of gaining control your own heart rate, emotions, concentration, and other responses to your body during times of stress.
  • DHA MedCard: The MedCard app allow DHA pharmacies to capture and verify the validation dates of third-party payers for DOD beneficiaries. It also provides users with a way to capture other information about themselves and family members that may be helpful when interacting with a pharmacist.
  • Positive Activity Jackpot: The app uses a behavioral therapy called "pleasant event scheduling," used to overcome depression and build resilience. It uses augmented reality technology to help users find nearby enjoyable activities and makes suggestions. Can't make up your mind? Pull the lever and the app's jackpot function makes a choice for you.

All of these apps are available on the Apple App Store and on Google Play. For the Military Health System's App Portfolio, click here.

You also may be interested in...

Fact Sheet
Aug 1, 2023

TRICARE Online Patient Portal

.PDF | 737.91 KB

TRICARE Online Patient Portal is the Department of Defense online patient portal providing eligible beneficiaries access to military hospital and clinic appointing, prescription refill, DOD PP Health Record personal health data, Secure Messaging, Service Separation/Retirement and Nurse Advice Line.

Article
Aug 1, 2023

Active Surveillance for Acute Respiratory Disease Detected No Outbreaks at Four U.S. Army Basic Training Installations in 2022

This article presents the 2022 results of the active surveillance program for acute respiratory disease and Group A Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus conducted by the Defense Centers for Public Health-Aberdeen at the four Army installations responsible for basic combat training or one-station unit training. This ARD surveillance program rapidly monitors, ...

Article Around MHS
Jul 7, 2023

Fate Brings Accident Victim to Brooke Amy Medical Center for Groundbreaking Procedure

Madisyn Cardenas, center, is pictured with her family after a graduation ceremony for her sister Larissa Sanchez at Texas A&M University in Kingsville, Texas, on May 12. From left, dad Stephen Cardenas, brother Stevie Cardenas, sister Larissa Sanchez, Madisyn Cardenas, mother Jennifer Cardenas, sister Natalie Villarreal. Cardenas was severely injured in a roadside accident on Oct. 5, 2022 and brought to Brooke Army Medical Center for a groundbreaking procedure. (Photo Courtesy Department of Defense)

After being struck by a car, Madisyn Cardenas had a torn aorta, broken hip, pinky finger, pelvis, and clavicle; lacerated tongue; separated abdomen; kidney lacerations; colon tear; brain hematoma; and multiple cuts, bruises, and puncture wounds. “The scariest of all was a tear in my aorta that went undetected until my arrival at Brooke Army Medical ...

Article
Jun 1, 2023

Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable to Various Illnesses and Injuries Among Active Component Members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2022

This annual summary uses several health care burden measures to quantify the impacts of various illnesses and injuries in 2022 among members of the active component of the U.S. Armed Forces. Health care burden metrics include the total number of medical encounters, individuals affected, and hospital bed days.

Article
Jun 1, 2023

Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable to Various Illnesses and Injuries Among Active Component Members, U.S. Coast Guard, 2022

This report employs the same disease classification system and health care burden measures as employed in the MSMR burden analysis of the U.S. Armed Forces active component to quantify the impacts of various illnesses and injuries among members of the active component of the U.S. Coast Guard in 2022.

Last Updated: July 11, 2023
Follow us on Instagram Follow us on LinkedIn Follow us on Facebook Follow us on X Follow us on YouTube Sign up on GovDelivery