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988: The Suicide & Crisis Lifeline

You can call or text 988 or chat 988lifeline.org for yourself or if you're worried about a loved one who may need crisis support. The 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline serves as a universal entry point so that no matter where you live in the United States, you can reach a trained crisis counselor who can help. 988 offers 24/7 access to trained crisis counselors who can help people experiencing mental health-related distress. That could be:

  • Thoughts of suicide.
  • Mental health or substance use crisis.
  • Any other kind of emotion distress.

To get help from the Military and Veterans Crisis Line outside the continental U.S. call:

  • Europe: 844-702-5495 or DSN 988
  • Pacific: 844-702-5493 or DSN 988
  • Southwest Asia: 855-422-7719 or DSN 988
Woman in uniform talking on the phone. 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline. Links to: https://www.health.mil/News/In-the-Spotlight/988

We can all help prevent suicide. The 988 Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals in the United States.

 

Frequently Asked Questions about 988

Is 988 only for a suicide-related crisis?

 

What happens when I chat via 988?

 

What happens if I text 988?

 

Does calling/texting/chatting the 988 Lifeline really help?

Learn More About the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline

Suicide can touch anyone, anywhere, and at any time. But it is preventable and there is hope. Find more suicide prevention resources from the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline:

Military Health System Resources

The Military Health System also has many resources available to help service members, families, or veterans who are struggling with mental health challenges.

Find MHS Mental Health Resources

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Last Updated: February 05, 2024
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