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Army Recovery Care Coordinator Guides Veterans, Caregivers in Recovery

Image of Nadlyn Snape_725. Nadlyn Snape is an Army recovery care coordinator supporting service members, their families and caregivers in the Fort Campbell, Kentucky and Clarksville, Tennessee areas

When it comes to supporting our nation's wounded, ill, and injured service members, veterans, and their families/caregivers, Nadlyn Snape is someone you want in your corner.

In her role as an Army recovery care coordinator (RCC) in the Fort Campbell, Kentucky and Clarksville, Tennessee areas, Snape provides proactive support to this population through ongoing coordination of non-medical resources to ensure they receive the assistance required when navigating the recovery, rehabilitation, and reintegration or transition process.

"In a nutshell, we provide access to different resources, such as financial assistance and military benefits like Service members' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection and Combat-Related Special Compensation. We also ensure coordination with the Department of Veterans Affairs prior to transitioning to veteran status, as well as provide on-going support after they have transitioned," she explained.

Snape begins assisting each recovering service member (RSM) and their family/caregiver by working closely with them and a multidisciplinary recovery team to develop a comprehensive recovery plan (CRP) that identifies the RSMs' and their families'/caregivers' goals and the resources needed to achieve them. "The position [of RCC] is unique. No client is the same and sometimes it takes creativity to help determine what will best suit the service members and veterans, but it always requires a team effort," said Snape.

Having transitioned from the military herself, Snape expressed, "As an RCC, I like to take a hands-on approach and walk them through every step of the way so they can have a successful transition. Transitioning is no easy task. As a service member transitions, the military is all they have known for so many years and it's very hard to take off the uniform to start another chapter."

Since becoming an RCC in 2015 with the Army Recovery Care Program (ARCP), Snape has gathered a wealth of knowledge that she eagerly passes on to the RSMs, veterans, and families/caregivers she works with. One of her go-to resources is the National Resource Directory as it can help them discover and navigate national, state, and local resources relevant to their personal needs.

Snape also coordinates with various non-profit organizations that provide a variety of services to service members, veterans, and their families. For example, "Renewal Coalition provides an all-expense paid couples/families retreat in Florida where families can go to relax. Clients who have been on the retreat have nothing but great experiences to share," she explained.

In December 2019, Snape was honored to receive a Service to America award from Freedom Alliance for her consistent referral of RSMs and veterans to their program.

As she gets back to her job of supporting wounded, ill, and injured service members; veterans; and their families/caregivers, Snape wants to leave everyone with this, "Financial planning is the best advice that I share with my RSMs because most of those who are transitioning didn't plan to transition.

"Start looking at your finances and start planning your transition strategy. I also challenge every RSM to take charge of their health and wellness and focus on their recovery," she concluded.

More information on ARCP and Warrior Care is available here.

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Last Updated: February 09, 2022
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