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Vision Center of Excellence

The Vision Center of Excellence leads and advocates for programs and initiatives with the following three inter-related goals: to improve vision health, optimize readiness, and enhance quality of life for Service members and Veterans.

By working to improve vision health, optimizing readiness and enhancing quality of life for Service members and Veterans, VCE promotes collaboration, facilitates integration and serves as an advocate for vision across the Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs health care systems. Further collaborative efforts with other federal health care organizations, academia and private sector organizations allow VCE to enhance development of VCE program priorities for research and quality care initiatives. Learn More About VCE

What We Do

VCE maximizes the potential for effective prevention, diagnosis, mitigation, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries and disorders of the visual system through its collaborative efforts and helps facilitate the identification of research capabilities within and between DOD and VA.

For Providers

VCE provides information, resources and continuing education training on eye injury prevention and responses to concerns specifically tailored to health care professionals. 

Learn More about Treatment Options

For Service Members

There are many resources available to service members. VCE offers an organized and comprehensive list of resources including DOD, VA, state and other national resources.

Find a Vision Resource

For Families & Beneficiaries

VCE can help family members find answers to your questions about eye injury prevention and response. Through partnerships with the DOD, VA, and a national network of military and civilian agencies, community leaders, advocacy groups, clinical experts, and academic institutions, VCE provides resources to help you with your concerns.

Get Answers Now

Vision Research

VCE continually strives to improve the recognition and management of ocular injuries and vision-threatening conditions across military and veteran populations. Such efforts supporting improved care and coordination of care are essential for maintaining the visual performance of U.S. Service Members and Veterans.

Explore VCE Research

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New Centers Will Deliver Advanced Care for Serious Eye Injuries

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4/27/2022
Army Brig. Gen. Katherine Simonson, Defense Health Agency Deputy Assistant Director of the Research and Engineering Directorate, and Dr. Barclay Butler, Assistant Director for Management, DHA, talks with Army Lt. Col. Samantha Rodgers, Ophthalmology chief (left), during a tour and designation ceremony April 19 at the Ocular Trauma Center – San Antonio Region, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. The designation ceremony marked the launch of DHA’s first Ocular Trauma Center, comprised of personnel from Brooke Army Medical Center and the 59th Medical Group. (Photo: Larine H. Barr, DOD)

The Defense Health Agency launched the first of four Ocular Trauma Centers, which will become primary hubs for the treatment of complex eye injuries and development of cutting-edge research programs.

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Wear Approved Safety Eye Protection, Save Your Vision

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3/25/2022
Gunner with 1Brigade Combat Team 82nd Division wears shaded eye protection as he fires his M249 at Rotation 21-05 at the Joint Readiness Training Center. (Photo: Capt. Joseph Warren)

The Tri-Service Vision Conservation and Readiness Branch, or TSVCRB, encourages service members to wear eye protection while at work and at home to prevent eye injuries.

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Ask the Doc: Can a Concussion Affect Hearing and Vision?

Article
3/16/2022
Elizabeth Kirkpatrick, a physical therapist for the Fort Drum Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Clinic, New York, uses a model of the inner ear on Feb. 27, 2019, to demonstrate how a concussion can cause inner ear, or vestibular, damage which may result in dizziness, anxiety, depression, moodiness, balance problems and irritability to name a few. (Photo: Warren W. Wright Jr., Fort Drum MEDDAC)

Even a mild concussion can lead to hearing and vision problems.

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Data Registry Helps Improve Research and Treatment for Eye Injuries

Article
3/14/2022
Pvt. Second Class Jagger Dixon, treats an eye injury during Expert Infantryman Badge testing, June 15, 2021, at Fort Polk, Louisiana. Dixon is a soldier with B Company; 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division. Soldiers must successfully execute a variety of warrior tasks to earn their EIB. (Photo: Army Spc. Kay Edwards, 27th Public Affairs Detachment)

Eye injury registry (DVEIVR) transforms data into usable information to help improve initial warfighter care and rehabilitation.

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It’s True – Carrots (and Other Vegetables) Can Help You See in the Dark

Article
3/4/2022
Each color in fruits and vegetables indicates an abundance of specific nutrients.

Have you ever heard that carrots are good for your eyes, or that they can help you see in the dark? It’s true – carrots are rich in the compound beta carotene, which your body uses to make a form of vitamin A that helps your eyes adjust in the dark. A shortage of vitamin A can cause a host of health problems, including blindness.

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For Thousands of Troops, Eye Surgery is Key to Vision Readiness

Article
2/10/2022
A surgical team with the Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program at Womack Army Medical Center at Fort Bragg monitors the progress of a patient's surgery inside the Ophthalmology Clinic's Refractive Surgery suite.

Helping service members – especially aviators – see clearly without glasses is key to military readiness.

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Researchers Connect with Warfighters to Guide Tech Development

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1/25/2022
Military personnel trying an immersive training device

Researchers ‘get out of the clinic’ to learn warfighter challenges

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Military Laser Eye Surgery: Enhancing Vision Readiness

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7/12/2021
Military health personnel looking at wavescan results

Enhancing vision readiness through laser eye surgery is now available at 26 military medical treatment facilities.

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Last Updated: April 28, 2022

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