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Vaccine Safety/Adverse Events

                     Support Center

Vaccine Reactions

Vaccines are prescription medications. Like any medication, they can cause reactions in some people.

What kind of reactions can occur after I get a vaccine?

Reactions from vaccines can range from mild, typical symptoms, such as swelling and tenderness at the injection site to more serious reactions, such as difficulty breathing. We continue to learn about these reactions as the field of immunology evolves.

Adverse EventsSometimes the terms "side effect" and "adverse event" are used interchangeably; however, there is a difference between these two terms.

What is a side effect?

Side effects are mild. They go away on their own or with over-the-counter pain and fever reducers.

Some people may have:

  • itching, burning, redness or swelling at the site where the vaccine was given
  • muscle aches, headache, fatigue, fever, body and/or joint aches.

Side effects usually last fewer than 7 days.

What is an adverse event?

Vaccine adverse events are defined as new onset symptoms or illness that:

  • appear within the first few days or weeks after receiving one or more immunizations;
  • have no apparent explanation;
  • impact quality of life, such as:
    • loss of work time or ability to perform usual activities.
    • hospitalization/quarters or emergency/unscheduled medical visits
  • last for more than a few days and/or do not respond to over-the-counter medication.

What should I do if I have a reaction to a vaccine?

Generally, for mild and expected side effects, taking an over-the-counter pain reliever/fever reducer is sufficient. If these problems last for more than a 7 days or get worse, contact your healthcare provider.

For more serious vaccine reactions, contact your healthcare provider.

If it is an emergency, such as chest pain or shortness of breath, go to the closest hospital.

You or your provider may also contact the Worldwide DHA Immunization Healthcare Support Center (1-877-438-8222) for assistance with documentation, management, and reporting of the vaccine reaction and for future vaccine recommendations and exemptions. 

You also may be interested in...

Safety evaluation of adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine live, oral in military recruits

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7/27/2016

This study retrospectively evaluated possible adverse events related to adenovirus vaccination using data from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS) database.

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Adenovirus | Vaccine Safety/Adverse Events

Reactions to Vaccines

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Treatment of Reserve Component Members of the Military MTFs for Health Care Related to Immunization

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Ensuring Reserve Component Have Full Access to DoD Military Treatment Facilities for Treatment Evaluation of Adverse Events from DoD Directed Immunizations

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